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91st United States Congress

The Ninety-first United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from January 3, 1969, to January 3, 1971, during the first two years of the first administration of U.S. President Richard Nixon.

91st United States Congress
90th ←
→ 92nd
USCapitol.jpg
January 3, 1969 – January 3, 1971
Senate President Hubert Humphrey (D)
until January 20, 1969
Spiro Agnew (R)
from January 20, 1969
Senate Pres. pro tem Richard Russell Jr. (D)
House Speaker John W. McCormack (D)
Members 100 senators
435 representatives
Senate Majority Democratic
House Majority Democratic
Sessions
1st: January 3, 1969 – December 23, 1969
2nd: January 19, 1970 – January 2, 1971

The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the Eighteenth Census of the United States in 1960. Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

Contents

Major eventsEdit

Major legislationEdit

 
President Richard Nixon paying his last tributes to Sen. Everett Dirksen, who died September 7, 1969.

Party summaryEdit

The count below identifies party affiliations at the beginning of the first session of this Congress, and includes members from vacancies and newly admitted states, when they were first seated. Changes resulting from subsequent replacements are shown below in the "Changes in membership" section.

SenateEdit

 
Party standings on the opening day of the 91st Congress
  57 Democratic Senators
  43 Republican Senators

TOTAL members: 100

House of RepresentativesEdit

TOTAL members: 435

LeadershipEdit

CaucusesEdit

MembersEdit

This list is arranged by chamber, then by state. Senators are listed in order of seniority, and Representatives are listed by district.

SenateEdit

Senators are popularly elected statewide every two years, with one-third beginning new six-year terms with each Congress. Preceding the names in the list below are Senate class numbers, which indicate the cycle of their election. In this Congress, Class 1 meant their term ended with this Congress, requiring reelection in 1970; Class 2 meant their term began in the last Congress, requiring reelection in 1972; and Class 3 meant their term began in this Congress, requiring reelection in 1974.

AlabamaEdit

AlaskaEdit

ArizonaEdit

ArkansasEdit

CaliforniaEdit

ColoradoEdit

ConnecticutEdit

DelawareEdit

FloridaEdit

GeorgiaEdit

HawaiiEdit

IdahoEdit

IllinoisEdit

IndianaEdit

IowaEdit

KansasEdit

KentuckyEdit

LouisianaEdit

MaineEdit

MarylandEdit

MassachusettsEdit

MichiganEdit

MinnesotaEdit

MississippiEdit

MissouriEdit

MontanaEdit

NebraskaEdit

NevadaEdit

New HampshireEdit

New JerseyEdit

New MexicoEdit

New YorkEdit

North CarolinaEdit

North DakotaEdit

OhioEdit

OklahomaEdit

OregonEdit

PennsylvaniaEdit

Rhode IslandEdit

South CarolinaEdit

South DakotaEdit

TennesseeEdit

TexasEdit

UtahEdit

VermontEdit

VirginiaEdit

WashingtonEdit

West VirginiaEdit

WisconsinEdit

WyomingEdit

House of RepresentativesEdit

 
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The names of members of the House of Representatives elected statewide on the general ticket or otherwise at-large, are preceded by an "A/L," and the names of those elected from districts, whether plural or single member, are preceded by their district numbers.

Many of the congressional district numbers are linked to articles describing the district itself. Since the boundaries of the districts have changed often and substantially, the linked article may only describe the district as it exists today, and not as it was at the time of this Congress.

AlabamaEdit

(5–3 Democratic)

AlaskaEdit

(1 Republican)

ArizonaEdit

(2–1 Republican)

ArkansasEdit

(3–1 Democratic)

CaliforniaEdit

(21–16 Democratic)

ColoradoEdit

(3–1 Democratic)

ConnecticutEdit

(4–2 Democratic)

DelawareEdit

(1 Republican)

FloridaEdit

(9–3 Democratic)

GeorgiaEdit

(8–2 Democratic)

====Hawaii====[1]
(2 Democrats)

IdahoEdit

(2 Republicans)

IllinoisEdit

(12–12 split)

IndianaEdit

(7–4 Republican)

IowaEdit

(5–2 Republican)

KansasEdit

(5 Republicans)

KentuckyEdit

(4–3 Democratic)

LouisianaEdit

(8 Democrats)

MaineEdit

(2 Democrats)

MarylandEdit

(4–4 split)

MassachusettsEdit

(7–5 Democratic)

MichiganEdit

(12–7 Republican)

MinnesotaEdit

(5–3 Republican)

MississippiEdit

(5 Democrats)

MissouriEdit

(9–1 Democratic)

MontanaEdit

(1–1 split)

NebraskaEdit

(3 Republicans)

NevadaEdit

(1 Democrat)

New HampshireEdit

(2 Republicans)

New JerseyEdit

(9–6 Democratic)

New MexicoEdit

(2 Republicans)

New YorkEdit

(26–15 Democratic)

North CarolinaEdit

(7–4 Democratic)

North DakotaEdit

(2 Republicans)

OhioEdit

(18–6 Republican)

OklahomaEdit

(4–2 Democratic)

OregonEdit

(2–2 split)

PennsylvaniaEdit

(14–13 Democratic)

Rhode IslandEdit

(2 Democrats)

South CarolinaEdit

(5–1 Democratic)

South DakotaEdit

(2 Republicans)

TennesseeEdit

(5–4 Democratic)

TexasEdit

(20–3 Democratic)

UtahEdit

(2 Republicans)

VermontEdit

(1 Republican)

VirginiaEdit

(5–5 split)

WashingtonEdit

(5–2 Democratic)

West VirginiaEdit

(5 Democrats)

WisconsinEdit

(6–3 Republican)

WyomingEdit

(1 Republican)

DelegatesEdit

Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (1 New Progressive)

Changes in membershipEdit

The count below reflects changes from the beginning of the first session of this Congress

SenateEdit

  • replacements: 3
  • deaths: 1
  • resignations: 2
  • Total seats with changes: 3


State
(class)
Vacator Reason for change Successor Date of successor's
formal installation
Illinois
(3)
Everett Dirksen (R) Died September 7, 1969 Ralph Tyler Smith (R) September 17, 1969
Illinois
(3)
Ralph Tyler Smith (R) Successor elected November 3, 1970 Adlai Stevenson III (D) November 17, 1970
Delaware
(1)
John J. Williams (R) Resigned December 30, 1970 William V. Roth Jr. (R) January 1, 1971
California
(1)
George Murphy (R) Resigned January 2, 1971 John V. Tunney (D) January 2, 1971

House of RepresentativesEdit

  • replacements: 14
  • deaths: 10
  • resignations: 8
  • Total seats with changes: 18


District Vacator Reason for change Successor Date of successor's
formal installation
California 27th Edwin Reinecke (R) Resigned January 21, 1969, after becoming Lieutenant Governor of California Barry Goldwater Jr. (R) April 29, 1969
Wisconsin 7th Melvin R. Laird (R) Resigned January 21, 1969, after being appointed United States Secretary of Defense Dave Obey (D) April 1, 1969
Tennessee 8th Robert A. Everett (D) Died January 26, 1969 Ed Jones (D) March 25, 1969
Montana 2nd James F. Battin (R) Resigned February 27, 1969, after being appointed judge for the US District Court for the District of Montana John Melcher (D) June 24, 1969
Illinois 13th Donald Rumsfeld (R) Resigned May 25, 1969, after being appointed Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity Phil Crane (R) November 25, 1969
Massachusetts 6th William H. Bates (R) Died June 22, 1969 Michael J. Harrington (D) September 30, 1969
Illinois 6th Daniel J. Ronan (D) Died August 13, 1969 George W. Collins (D) November 3, 1970
New Jersey 8th Charles S. Joelson (D) Resigned September 4, 1969, after becoming judge of Superior Court of New Jersey Robert A. Roe (D) November 4, 1969
New Jersey 6th William T. Cahill (R) Resigned January 19, 1970, after becoming Governor of New Jersey Edwin B. Forsythe (R) November 3, 1970
California 24th Glenard P. Lipscomb (R) Died February 1, 1970 John H. Rousselot (R) June 30, 1970
California 35th James B. Utt (R) Died March 1, 1970 John G. Schmitz (R) June 30, 1970
Connecticut 2nd William St. Onge (D) Died May 1, 1970 Robert H. Steele (R) November 3, 1970
Ohio 19th Michael J. Kirwan (D) Died July 27, 1970 Charles J. Carney (D) November 3, 1970
Pennsylvania 9th George Watkins (R) Died August 7, 1970 John H. Ware III (R) November 3, 1970
Illinois 1st William L. Dawson (D) Died November 9, 1970 Vacant Not filled this term
South Carolina 1st L. Mendel Rivers (D) Died December 28, 1970 Vacant Not filled this term
Delaware At-large William V. Roth Jr. (R) Resigned December 31, 1970, after being appointed to the U.S. Senate Vacant Not filled this term
California 38th John V. Tunney (D) Resigned January 2, 1971, after being appointed to the U.S. Senate Vacant Not filled this term

CommitteesEdit

Lists of committees and their party leaders, for members (House and Senate) of the committees and their assignments, go into the Official Congressional Directory at the bottom of the article and click on the link (2 links), in the directory after the pages of terms of service, you will see the committees of the Senate, House (Standing with Subcommittees, Select and Special) and Joint and after the committee pages, you will see the House/Senate committee assignments in the directory, on the committees section of the House and Senate in the Official Congressional Directory, the committee's members on the first row on the left side shows the chairman of the committee and on the right side shows the ranking member of the committee.

SenateEdit

House of RepresentativesEdit

Joint committeesEdit

Employees and legislative agency directorsEdit

Legislative branch agency directors

Senate

House of Representatives

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ both representatives were elected statewide on a general ticket
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 

External linksEdit