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North Carolina's 1st congressional district

North Carolina's 1st congressional district consists of counties that border Virginia, and extending southward into several counties of the Inner Banks and Research Triangle regions. Geographically and demographically diverse, it covers many rural areas of northeastern North Carolina, among the state's most economically poor, as well as a part of the heavily urbanized Research Triangle. It contains towns and cities such as Durham, Greenville, Elizabeth City, Henderson, Roanoke Rapids, Rocky Mount, Goldsboro, and New Bern.

North Carolina's 1st congressional district
North Carolina US Congressional District 1 (since 2017).tif
North Carolina's 1st congressional district since January 3, 2017
Representative
  G. K. Butterfield
DWilson
Distribution
  • 62.9[1]% urban
  • 37.1% rural
Population (2016)750,278[2]
Median income$43,853[3]
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+17[4]

The district is represented by Rep. G. K. Butterfield, a Democrat. He has been the representative since 2005. In the 2006 election, he won unopposed. In 2010 he defeated Republican Ashley Woolard from Washington, North Carolina in the general election.

On February 5, 2016, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled the 1st district, as well as the 12th, were gerrymandered along racial lines, which was unconstitutional, and must be redrawn by March 15, 2016.[5]

Besides a brief period from 1895 until 1899 when the district was held by a Populist, the 1st district has been consistently Democratic since 1883.

Recent election resultsEdit

Presidential racesEdit

Year Results
2000 Gore 57–42%
2004 Kerry 57–42%
2008 Obama 62–37%
2012 Obama 68–31%
2016 Clinton 68-31%

Recent congressional racesEdit

U.S. House election, 2002: North Carolina's 1st district[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frank W. Ballance Jr. 93,157 63.74
Republican Greg Dority 50,907 34.83
Libertarian Mike Ruff 2,093 1.43
Total votes 146,157 100
U.S. House election, 2004: North Carolina's 1st district[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic George Kenneth Butterfield Jr. 137,667 63.98
Republican Greg Dority 77,508 36.02
Total votes 215,175 100
U.S. House election, 2006: North Carolina's 1st district[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic George Kenneth Butterfield Jr. 82,510 100
Total votes 82,510 100
U.S. House election, 2008: North Carolina's 1st district[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic George Kenneth Butterfield Jr. 192,765 70.28
Republican Dean Stephens 81,506 29.72
Total votes 274,271 100
U.S. House election, 2010: North Carolina's 1st district[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic George Kenneth Butterfield Jr. 103,294 59.31
Republican Ashley Woolard 70,867 40.69
Total votes 174,161 100
U.S. House election, 2012: North Carolina's 1st district[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic George Kenneth Butterfield Jr. 254,644 75.32
Republican Pete DiLauro 77,288 22.86
Libertarian Darryl Holloman 6,134 1.81
Total votes 338,066 99.9
U.S. House election, 2014: North Carolina's 1st district[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic George Kenneth Butterfield Jr. 154,333 73.38
Republican Arthur Rich 55,990 26.62
Total votes 210,323 100
U.S. House election, 2016: North Carolina's 1st district[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic George Kenneth Butterfield Jr. 240,661 68.62
Republican H. Powell Dew Jr. 101,567 28.96
Libertarian Joseph John Summerell 8,259 2.4
Total votes 346,830 99.98
U.S. House election, 2018: North Carolina's 1st district[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic George Kenneth Butterfield Jr. 190,457 69.9
Republican Roger Allison 82,218 30.2
Total votes 272,675 100.0

List of members representing the districtEdit

Representative Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history District location
 
John B. Ashe
Anti-Administration March 24, 1790 –
March 3, 1791
1st Elected in 1790.
Redistricted to the 3rd district.
1790–1791
"Roanoke division"
John Steele Pro-Administration March 4, 1791 –
March 3, 1793
2nd Redistricted from the 4th district and re-elected in 1791.
[Data unknown/missing.]
1791–1793
"Yadkin division"
Joseph McDowell Anti-Administration March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1795
3rd Elected in 1793.
Lost re-election.
1793–1803
[Data unknown/missing.]
James Holland Democratic-Republican March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1797
4th Elected in 1795.
Lost re-election.
 
Joseph McDowell Jr.
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1797 –
March 3, 1799
5th Elected in 1796.
Lost re-election.
Joseph Dickson Federalist March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1801
6th Elected in 1798.
Lost re-election.
James Holland Democratic-Republican March 4, 1801 –
March 3, 1803
7th Elected in 1800.
Redistricted to the 11th district.
Thomas Wynns Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1807
8th
9th
Redistricted from the 8th district and re-elected in 1803.
Re-elected in 1804.
Retired.
1803–1813
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lemuel Sawyer Democratic-Republican March 4, 1807 –
March 3, 1813
10th
11th
12th
Elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Lost re-election.
William H. Murfree Democratic-Republican March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1817
13th
14th
Elected in 1813.
Re-elected in 1815.
Retired.
1813–1823
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lemuel Sawyer Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1823
15th
16th
17th
Elected in 1817.
Re-elected in 1819.
Re-elected in 1821.
Lost re-election.
Alfred M. Gatlin Crawford Democratic-Republican March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
18th Elected in 1823.
Lost re-election.
1823–1833
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lemuel Sawyer Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1829
19th
20th
Elected in 1825.
Re-elected in 1827.
Lost re-election.
William B. Shepard Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1837
21st
22nd
23rd
24th
Elected in 1829.
[Data unknown/missing.]
1833–1843
[Data unknown/missing.]
Samuel T. Sawyer Whig March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
25th [Data unknown/missing.]
Kenneth Rayner Whig March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1843
26th
27th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 9th district.
 
Thomas L. Clingman
Whig March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
28th [Data unknown/missing.] 1843–1853
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
James Graham
Whig March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
29th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Thomas L. Clingman
Whig March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1853
30th
31st
32nd
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 8th district.
 
Henry M. Shaw
Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd [Data unknown/missing.] 1853–1863
[Data unknown/missing.]
Robert T. Paine Know Nothing March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Henry M. Shaw
Democratic March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
35th [Data unknown/missing.]
William N. H. Smith Opposition March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
36th North Carolina seceded from the Union in May 1861
Vacant March 3, 1861 –
July 6, 1868
Civil War and Reconstruction
1863–1873
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
John R. French
Republican July 6, 1868 –
March 3, 1869
40th Elected to finish the vacant term.
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Clinton L. Cobb
Republican March 4, 1869 –
March 3, 1875
41st
42nd
43rd
[Data unknown/missing.]
1873–1883
[Data unknown/missing.]
Jesse J. Yeates Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879
44th
45th
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Joseph J. Martin
Republican March 3, 1879 –
January 29, 1881
46th Lost contested election.
Jesse J. Yeates Democratic January 29, 1881 –
March 3, 1881
46th Won contested election.
 
Louis C. Latham
Democratic March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1883
47th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Walter F. Pool
Republican March 4, 1883 –
August 25, 1883
48th [Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
1883–1893
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vacant August 25, 1883 –
November 20, 1883
 
Thomas G. Skinner
Democratic November 20, 1883 –
March 3, 1887
48th
49th
Elected to finish Pool's term.
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Louis C. Latham
Democratic March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1889
50th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Thomas G. Skinner
Democratic March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1891
51st [Data unknown/missing.]
William A. B. Branch Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1895
52nd
53rd
[Data unknown/missing.]
1893–1903
[Data unknown/missing.]
Harry Skinner Populist March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1899
54th
55th
[Data unknown/missing.]
John H. Small Democratic March 4, 1899 –
March 3, 1921
56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
66th
[Data unknown/missing.]
1903–1913
[Data unknown/missing.]
1913–1933
[Data unknown/missing.]
Hallett S. Ward Democratic March 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1925
67th
68th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lindsay C. Warren Democratic March 3, 1925 –
October 31, 1940
69th
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
76th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned to become U.S. Comptroller General.
1933–1943
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vacant October 31, 1940 –
November 5, 1940
 
Herbert C. Bonner
Democratic November 5, 1940 –
November 7, 1965
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
Elected to finish Warren's term.
Died.
1943–1953
[Data unknown/missing.]
1953–1963
[Data unknown/missing.]
1963–1973
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vacant November 7, 1965 –
February 5, 1966
 
Walter B. Jones Sr.
Democratic February 5, 1966 –
September 15, 1992
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
Elected to finish Bonner's term.
Died.
1973–1983
[Data unknown/missing.]
1983–1993
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vacant September 15, 1992 –
November 3, 1992
 
Eva Clayton
Democratic November 3, 1992 –
January 3, 2003
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
Elected to finish Jones's term.
Retired.
1993–2003
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Frank Ballance
Democratic January 3, 2003 –
June 11, 2004
108th [Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned.
2003–2013
 
Vacant June 11, 2004 –
July 20, 2004
 
G. K. Butterfield
Democratic July 20, 2004 –
Present
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
116th
Elected to finish Ballance's term.
2013–2017
 
2017–Present
 

Living former membersEdit

As of February 2019, there is one living former member. The most recent representative to die was Frank Ballance (served 2003–2004) on February 22, 2019.

Representative Term of office Date of birth (and age)
Eva Clayton 1992–2003 (1934-09-16) September 16, 1934 (age 85)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/cd_state.html
  2. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=37&cd=01
  3. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=37&cd=01
  4. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  5. ^ Simpson, Ian (February 8, 2016). "Judges find two N. Carolina congressional districts racially gerrymandered". Reuters. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  6. ^ "11/05/2002 Official General Election Results - Statewide". North Carolina State Board of Elections. November 15, 2002. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  7. ^ "11/02/2004 Official General Election Results - Statewide". North Carolina State Board of Elections. November 12, 2004. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  8. ^ "11/07/2006 Official General Election Results - Statewide". North Carolina State Board of Elections. November 17, 2006. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  9. ^ "11/04/2008 Official General Election Results - Statewide". North Carolina State Board of Elections. November 14, 2008. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  10. ^ "11/02/2010 Official General Election Results - Statewide". North Carolina State Board of Elections. November 12, 2010. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  11. ^ "11/06/2012 Official General Election Results - Statewide". North Carolina State Board of Elections. November 16, 2012. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  12. ^ "11/04/2014 Official General Election Results - Statewide". North Carolina State Board of Elections. November 25, 2014. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  13. ^ "11/06/2016 Official General Election Results - Statewide". North Carolina State Board of Elections. December 13, 2016. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  14. ^ "District 1, North Carolina State Board of Elections & Ethics Enforcement". Retrieved November 10, 2018.

Coordinates: 36°06′03″N 77°30′14″W / 36.10083°N 77.50389°W / 36.10083; -77.50389