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North Carolina's 4th congressional district

The Fourth Congressional district of North Carolina is located in the central region of the state. The district includes part of Wake County, (parts of Raleigh, Cary, and Morrisville), all of Orange County, (Chapel Hill, Carrboro, and Hillsborough), and a small sliver of southern Durham County.

North Carolina's 4th congressional district
North Carolina US Congressional District 4 (since 2017).tif
North Carolina's 4th congressional district - since January 3, 2017.
Representative
  David Price
DChapel Hill
Population (2016)847,032[1]
Median income$70,293[2]
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+17[4]

The district is currently represented by 11-term Congressman David Price, a former political science professor at Duke who was first elected in 1986, ousting one-term Republican incumbent Bill Cobey.[5] Price was reelected in 1988, 1990, and 1992, but he was defeated in his bid for a fifth term in 1994 by Republican Fred Heineman, the Raleigh Police Chief, in a generally bad year for Democrats in North Carolina. Price came back to defeat Heineman in a rematch in 1996, and has been reelected each time since then by large margins, usually with more than 60% of the vote. In 2008, Price received 63% (265,751 votes) to defeat Republican challenger B.J. Lawson, who received 37% (153,947 votes).[6]

Before court mandated redistricting in 2016, according to research by Christopher Ingraham of the Washington Post, the district was the third most gerrymandered Congressional district in North Carolina and seventh most gerrymandered district in the United States.[7] In contrast, its predecessor was the most regularly drawn of the state's 13 districts.

HistoryEdit

From 2003 to 2013 it contained most of the area commonly known as The Triangle. It included all of Durham and Orange counties, part of Wake County and a small section of Chatham County. The 4th district picked up the most Republican areas of Wake County, such as Apex, Cary, and much of North Raleigh in order to help make the neighboring 13th and 2nd districts more Democratic. For instance, Barack Obama defeated John McCain in the Wake County portion of the district in 2008 by 51–48%, a difference of less than 8,000 votes in between the two candidates.[8] In contrast, Obama won Wake County overall by a much greater margin of 56–43%, and Obama swept the 4th district as a whole by 63–36%. The Republican influence in the district's Wake County portion was more than canceled out by the two Democratic strongholds of Orange and Durham counties, where Obama received 72% and 76%, respectively, his two best counties in the entire state. The 4th district had a Cook PVI of D+8, which made it the most Democratic white-majority district in the entire South outside of South Florida and Northern Virginia.

The district became even more heavily Democratic as a result of 2012 redistricting, in which the more Republican areas of western and southern Wake County were removed, along with northern Orange County and most of its share of Durham County. They were replaced by heavily Democratic portions of Alamance, Cumberland, Harnett and Lee counties. Additionally, the district was pushed further into Raleigh. Like its predecessor, the district is one of the few Southern districts with a significant concentration of progressive-minded white voters—similar to areas around Atlanta, Houston, Charlotte, Nashville, Memphis and Austin. The presence of the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and Duke University, as well as a large African-American population in Durham and Raleigh help contribute to the liberal nature of the 4th district.

Before court mandated redistricting in 2016, the district was just barely contiguous; the northern and southern portions were connected by a barely-discernible strip of land along the Lee/Harnett line.

Recent election results from presidential racesEdit

Year Office Results
2004 President Kerry 61–38%
2008 President Obama 72–27%
2012 President Obama 71–28%

Recent House electionsEdit

2002Edit

2002 US House election: North Carolina District 4[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Price 132,185 61.18
Republican Tuan A. Nguyen 78,095 36.15
Libertarian Ken Nelson 5,766 2.67
Total votes 216,046 100
Democratic hold

2004Edit

2004 US House election: North Carolina District 4[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Price 217,441 64.1
Republican Todd A. Batchelor 121,717 35.88
N/A Maximilian Longley 76 0.02
Total votes 339,234 100
Democratic hold

2006Edit

2006 US House election: North Carolina District 4[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Price 127,340 64.99
Republican Steve Acuff 68,599 35.01
Total votes 195,939 100
Democratic hold

2008Edit

2008 US House election: North Carolina District 4[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Price 265,751 63.32
Republican William (B.J.) Lawson 153,947 36.68
Total votes 419,698 100
Democratic hold

2010Edit

2010 US House election: North Carolina District 4[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Price 155,384 57.16
Republican William (B.J.) Lawson 116,448 42.84
Total votes 271,832 100
Democratic hold

2012Edit

2012 US House election: North Carolina District 4[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Price 259,534 74.47
Republican Tim D'Annunzio 88,951 25.53
Total votes 348,485 100
Democratic hold

2014Edit

2014 US House election: North Carolina District 4[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Price 169,946 74.75
Republican Paul Wright 57,416 25.25
Total votes 227,362 100
Democratic hold

2016Edit

2016 US House election: North Carolina District 4[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Price 279,380 68.22
Republican Sue Googe 130,161 31.78
Total votes 409,541 100
Democratic hold

2018Edit

2018 US House election: North Carolina District 4[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Price 247,067 72.4
Republican Steve Loor 82,052 24.0
Libertarian Barbara Howe 12,284 3.6
Total votes 341,403 100
Democratic hold

List of members representing the districtEdit

Member Party Years Electoral history District location
John Steele Pro-Administration April 19, 1790 –
March 3, 1791
Elected in 1790.
Redistricted to the 1st district.
1790–1791
"Yadkin division"
 
Hugh Williamson
Anti-Administration March 4, 1791 –
March 3, 1793
Redistricted from the 2nd district and re-elected in 1791.
[Data unknown/missing.]
1791–1793
"Albemarle division"
Alexander Mebane Anti-Administration March 4, 1793 –
July 5, 1795
Elected in 1793.
Re-elected in 1795.
Died.
1793–1803
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vacant July 5, 1795 –
December 7, 1795
Absalom Tatom Democratic-Republican December 7, 1795 –
June 1, 1796
Elected to finish Mebane's term and seated December 7, 1795.
Resigned.
Vacant June 1, 1796 –
December 13, 1796
William F. Strudwick Federalist December 13, 1796 –
March 3, 1797
Elected November 23, 1796 to finish Tatom's term and seated December 13, 1796.
Retired.
Richard Stanford Democratic-Republican March 4, 1797 –
March 3, 1803
Re-elected in 1796.
Re-elected in 1798.
Re-elected in 1800.
Redistricted to the 8th district.
William Blackledge Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1809
Elected in 1803.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Lost re-election.
1803–1813
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
John Stanly
Federalist March 4, 1809 –
March 3, 1811
Elected in 1808.
Retired.
William Blackledge Democratic-Republican March 4, 1811 –
March 3, 1813
Re-elected in 1810.
Lost re-election.
 
William Gaston
Federalist March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1817
Re-elected in 1813.
Re-elected in 1815.
Retired.
1813–1823
[Data unknown/missing.]
Jesse Slocumb Federalist March 4, 1817 –
December 20, 1820
Re-elected in 1817.
Re-elected in 1819.
Died.
Vacant December 20, 1820 –
February 7, 1821
William S. Blackledge Democratic-Republican February 7, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
Elected in January 1821 to finish Slocumb's term and seated February 7, 1821.
Re-elected later in 1821.
Retired.
 
Richard D. Spaight Jr.
Crawford Democratic-Republican March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
Elected in 1823.
Lost re-election.
1823–1833
[Data unknown/missing.]
John Heritage Bryan Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1829
Elected in 1825.
Re-elected in 1827.
Retired.
 
Jesse Speight
Jacksonian March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1837
Elected in 1829.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Charles B. Shepard Whig March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
[Data unknown/missing.]
Democratic March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1841
[Data unknown/missing.]
William H. Washington Whig March 4, 1841 –
March 3, 1843
[Data unknown/missing.]
Edmund Deberry Whig March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
Redistricted from the 7th district.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Alfred Dockery Whig March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
[Data unknown/missing.]
Augustine H. Shepperd Whig March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1851
[Data unknown/missing.]
James T. Morehead Whig March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
[Data unknown/missing.]
Sion H. Rogers Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Lawrence O'Bryan Branch
Democratic March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1861
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vacant March 3, 1861 –
July 6, 1868
Civil War and Reconstruction
 
John T. Deweese
Republican July 6, 1868 –
February 28, 1870
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned.
Vacant February 28, 1870 –
December 7, 1870
John Manning Jr. Democratic December 7, 1870 –
March 3, 1871
[Data unknown/missing.]
Sion H. Rogers Democratic March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1873
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
William A. Smith
Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Joseph J. Davis
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1881
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
William R. Cox
Democratic March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1887
[Data unknown/missing.]
John Nichols Independent March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1889
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Benjamin H. Bunn
Democratic March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1895
[Data unknown/missing.]
William F. Strowd Populist March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1899
[Data unknown/missing.]
John W. Atwater Independent Populist March 4, 1899 –
March 3, 1901
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Edward W. Pou
Democratic March 4, 1901 –
April 1, 1934
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
 
Harold D. Cooley
Democratic July 7, 1934 –
December 30, 1966
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned.
Vacant December 30, 1966 –
January 3, 1967
 
James C. Gardner
Republican January 3, 1967 –
January 3, 1969
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired to run for Governor of North Carolina
 
Nick Galifianakis
Democratic January 3, 1969 –
January 3, 1973
Redistricted from the 5th district.
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Ike F. Andrews
Democratic January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 1985
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Bill Cobey
Republican January 3, 1985 –
January 3, 1987
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
David Price
Democratic January 3, 1987 –
January 3, 1995
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Fred Heineman
Republican January 3, 1995 –
January 3, 1997
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
David Price
Democratic January 3, 1997 –
Present
[Data unknown/missing.]
2003–2013
 
2013–2017
 
2017–Present
 

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Preference for Racial or Ethnic Terminology". Infoplease. Retrieved February 8, 2006.
  2. ^ Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP), US Census Bureau. "My Congressional District". www.census.gov. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  3. ^ United States Census Bureau. "My Congressional District". Retrieved 8 September 2016.
  4. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  5. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/CandidateDetail.html?CandidateID=1398
  6. ^ "Local and National Election Results - Election Center 2008 - Elections & Politics from CNN.com". CNN.
  7. ^ Ingraham, Christopher. "America's most gerrymandered congressional districts". Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  8. ^ "north carolina hard totals". Google Docs. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  9. ^ "11/05/2002 Official General Election Results - Statewide". North Carolina State Board of Elections. November 15, 2002. Retrieved December 25, 2017.
  10. ^ "11/02/2004 Official General Election Results - Statewide". North Carolina State Board of Elections. November 12, 2004. Retrieved December 25, 2017.
  11. ^ "11/07/2006 Official General Election Results - Statewide". North Carolina State Board of Elections. November 17, 2006. Retrieved December 25, 2017.
  12. ^ "11/04/2008 Official General Election Results - Statewide". North Carolina State Board of Elections. November 14, 2008. Retrieved December 25, 2017.
  13. ^ "11/02/2010 Official General Election Results - Statewide". North Carolina State Board of Elections. November 12, 2010. Retrieved December 25, 2017.
  14. ^ "11/06/2012 Official General Election Results - Statewide". North Carolina State Board of Elections. November 16, 2012. Retrieved December 25, 2017.
  15. ^ "11/04/2014 Official General Election Results - Statewide". North Carolina State Board of Elections. November 25, 2014. Retrieved December 25, 2017.
  16. ^ "11/08/2016 Official General Election Results - Statewide". North Carolina State Board of Elections. December 13, 2016. Retrieved December 25, 2017.
  17. ^ "District 4, North Carolina State Board of Elections & Ethics Enforcement". North Carolina State Board of Elections & Ethics Enforcement. Retrieved November 10, 2018.

External linksEdit