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Horace Greeley

Horace Greeley (1811–1872) was editor of the New-York Tribune, as well as the Democratic and Liberal Republican candidate in the 1872 U.S. presidential election. Born to a poor family in New Hampshire, Greeley in 1831 went to New York City to seek his fortune. He lived there the rest of his life, but also spent much time at his farm in Chappaqua. In 1841, he founded the Tribune, which became the highest-circulating newspaper in the country. He urged the settlement of the American West, popularizing the phrase "Go West, young man, and grow up with the country", though it is uncertain if he invented it. Greeley was briefly a Whig congressman from New York, and helped found the Republican Party in 1854. When the Civil War broke out, he mostly supported President Abraham Lincoln, and urged the end of slavery. Greeley ran in 1872 in an attempt to unseat President Ulysses Grant, whose administration he deemed corrupt, but lost in a landslide. Devastated at the defeat, he died three weeks after Election Day. (Full article...)

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