Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Archive

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These featured pictures have been chosen to appear as picture of the day (POTD) on the English Wikipedia's Main Page, as scheduled below. Individual sections for each day on this page can be linked to with the day number of the month as the anchor name.

You can add an automatically updating POTD template to your user page using {{Pic of the day}} (version with blurb) or {{POTD}} (version without blurb). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.Purge server cache


August 1

Theatrical scenery

Theatrical scenery is used to provide a setting for a theatrical production. The main features are usually flats, two-dimensional canvas-covered panels painted to resemble three-dimensional surfaces or vistas. Other scenery types include curtains, platforms and scenery wagons. They all need to be light and portable, as well as durable. Construction of theatrical scenery is frequently one of the most time-consuming tasks when preparing for a show.

This photograph shows a model of the set designed for the first act of Giuseppe Verdi's opera Otello for a performance in Paris in 1895.

Set design credit: Marcel Jambon; photographed by the Bibliothèque nationale de France


August 2

Spotted trunkfish

The spotted trunkfish (Lactophrys bicaudalis) is a species of ray-finned fish in the family Ostraciidae, native to the Caribbean Sea and parts of the western Atlantic Ocean. Members of this family are known as boxfishes because they have a hard outer covering consisting of hexagonal, plate-like scales fused together into a solid, triangular or box-like carapace. Because of this casing, the body of the spotted trunkfish is not flexible, and locomotion is normally limited to slow movements performed by rippling its dorsal and anal fins and gently beating its pectoral fins. If faster motion is required, it can additionally use its caudal fin for propulsion. This spotted trunkfish was photographed at a depth of about 40 ft (12 m) at Bari Reef, Bonaire.

Photograph credit: Betty Wills


August 3

Reine

Reine is a fishing village located on the island of Moskenesøya in the Lofoten archipelago in northern Norway, serving as the administrative centre for the municipality of Moskenes, Nordland. A trading post was established here in 1743, and the village was a centre for the local fishing industry, with a fleet of boats and facilities for fish processing and marketing. In December 1941, part of Reine was burnt by the Germans in reprisal for Operation Anklet, a raid on the islands of Lofoten by British troops, who occupied the area for two days before withdrawing because of lack of air support.

Photograph credit: Simo Räsänen


August 4

Strip photography

This image shows Car 10 of the San Francisco cable car system photographed using strip photography, a technique that captures a two-dimensional image as a sequence of single-dimensional images over time. This technique can be implemented in various ways; in film photography, a camera with a vertical slit aperture can either have fixed film and a moving slit, or a fixed slit and moving film. One of the characteristics of strip photography is that moving objects are distorted based on the relative speed of their motion and the image capture. Slower-moving objects occupy more time, and thus appear wider, while faster-moving objects are narrower, as they occupy the slit for a shorter period of time. Stationary objects, particularly in the background, are rendered as a constant stripe.

Photograph credit: Dllu


August 5

Augusta Victoria Hospital

The Augusta Victoria Hospital is a church-hospital complex located on the northern side of the Mount of Olives in East Jerusalem, one of six hospitals in the East Jerusalem Hospitals Network. The hospital provides specialty care for Palestinians from across the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, with services including a cancer center, a dialysis unit, and a pediatric center. It is the second largest hospital in East Jerusalem, as well as the sole remaining specialized care unit located in the West Bank or Gaza Strip. The complex also includes the German Protestant Church of the Ascension, with a circa 50-metre-tall (160 ft) bell tower.

Photograph credit: Ori Aloni


August 6

Abbey Lincoln

Abbey Lincoln (August 6, 1930 – August 14, 2010) was an American jazz vocalist, songwriter, and actress. Beginning in the 1960s, she made a career out of delivering deeply felt presentations as well as writing and singing her own material. Her lyrics often reflected the ideals of the civil rights movement and helped in generating passion for the cause in the minds of her listeners. She explored more philosophical themes during the later years of her songwriting career and remained professionally active until well into her seventies. She also ventured into acting and appeared on television, and in films such as The Girl Can't Help It and Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. This photograph shows Lincoln in performance at the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam in 1966, and is part of the collection of Anefo, a Dutch photograph press agency.

Photograph credit: Jac. de Nijs; restored by Adam Cuerden


August 7

Peasant Woman Binding Sheaves (after Millet)

Peasant Woman Binding Sheaves (after Millet) is an 1889 oil-on-canvas painting by Dutch Post-Impressionist artist Vincent van Gogh showing a woman at work in a wheat field during the harvest. As a young man, Van Gogh pursued what he saw as a religious calling, wanting to minister to working people. Failing to find a vocation in ministry, he turned to art as a means of expressing and communicating his deep sense of the meaning of life. In his series of paintings of wheat fields, Van Gogh expressed through symbolism and use of colour his deeply felt spiritual beliefs, appreciation of manual labourers, and connection to nature.

This work is based on an 1852 drawing of a woman gathering wheat by Jean-François Millet. It is one of several paintings by Van Gogh based on the ten Travaux des champs engravings made for the journal L'Illustration from Millet's drawings of peasant life. Van Gogh's painting is in the collection of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.

Painting credit: Vincent van Gogh, after Jean-François Millet


August 8

Portsmouth Cathedral

Portsmouth Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral church in Portsmouth, England. A chapel was built on the site and dedicated to St Thomas of Canterbury in 1188, and became a parish church in the 14th century. Following substantial damage during the English Civil War, the tower and nave were reconstructed between 1683 and 1693. The building became a pro-cathedral when the Diocese of Portsmouth was split from the Diocese of Winchester in 1927. Plans to enlarge it were interrupted by World War II, and the building was finally consecrated as a cathedral in 1991.

This photograph shows Portsmouth Cathedral's three-manual and pedal, 49-stop organ, installed in 1994 by Nicholson & Co Ltd. The pipes originated from the John Nicholson organ of 1861 built for Manchester Cathedral, which had been relocated to Holy Trinity Church, Bolton.

Photograph credit: David Iliff


August 9

Singapore National Day Parade

The Singapore National Day Parade is a national ceremony in Singapore that takes place each year on 9 August to commemorate the country's independence. The firework display seen here was part of the festivities in 2011, held at The Float @ Marina Bay, the world's largest floating stage and football stadium, located on the waters of the Marina Reservoir. In the foreground on the right is the lotus-flower-shaped ArtScience Museum, situated within Marina Bay Sands, an integrated resort that opened in the same year.

Photograph credit: Chensiyuan


August 10

Battle of Scheveningen

The Battle of Scheveningen was the final naval battle of the First Anglo-Dutch War, taking place on 31 July 1653 (10 August in the Gregorian calendar). This oil-on-canvas painting of the battle, by Dutch marine artist Jan Abrahamsz Beerstraaten, shows a Dutch ship sinking in the right foreground and an English vessel on the left. In the centre, the Dutch flagship Brederode is engaged in furious action with English ships on either side, including the Resolution. By late afternoon, twelve of the Dutch ships had either been sunk or captured and the Dutch retired; however, the English fleet was also badly damaged, and returned to port to refit. Both sides claimed a victory; the English because of their tactical superiority, the Dutch because their strategic goal had been achieved by the lifting of the English blockade of their coast. This painting is in the collection of the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.

Painting credit: Jan Abrahamsz Beerstraaten


August 11

Kirinia roxelana

The lattice brown (Kirinia roxelana) is a butterfly in the family Nymphalidae found in south-eastern Europe and the Near East. It is found in a variety of habitats such as warm, dry grassland and scrubland near woodland, forest verges, vineyards and olive groves, usually in association with rocks or stone walls. It is a large butterfly with a wing length of about 3 cm (1.2 in); the adult is most commonly on the wing between May and July and the caterpillar feeds on broad-leaved grasses. This photograph shows a male resting on a rock in Mount Carmel National Park, Israel. Like other members of its family, it stands on only four legs while the other two remain curled up. The wings are covered with minute scales and their distinctive pattern help the butterfly protect itself by camouflage.

Photograph credit: Gideon Pisanty


August 12

Lietava Castle

Lietava Castle is an extensive ruined castle in the Súľov Mountains of northern Slovakia. It was built some time in the thirteenth century, most likely as an administrative and military centre. It occupies a strategic position alongside the Amber Road, a trade route along which amber and other goods were transported from the Baltic Sea southwards. Originally a four-storey tower, it was expanded and reconstructed under a succession of owners, before being abandoned in the seventeenth century. The ruins contain handsome fireplaces, wall inscriptions, coats of arms, and renaissance portals to attest to its previous grandeur.

Photograph credit: Vladimír Ruček


August 13

Chosen at random from a selection of six; all alternatives shown below

German Papiermark

Papiermark is the name given to the German currency from 4 August 1914, when the link between the Goldmark and gold was abandoned. In particular, the name is used for the banknotes issued during the hyperinflation period in Germany in 1922 and especially 1923. The German papiermark was issued by the Free City of Danzig during this period. The last of five series of Danzig mark was the 1923 inflation issue, which consisted of 1 million (8 August), 10 million (31 August), 100 million (22 September), 500 million (26 September), and 5 billion and 10 billion mark notes (11 October). The Danzig mark was replaced on 22 October 1923 by the Danzig gulden, issued by the Danzig Central Finance Department.

Other denominations:

Credit: Free City of Danzig; photographed by Andrew Shiva

German Papiermark

Papiermark is the name given to the German currency from 4 August 1914, when the link between the Goldmark and gold was abandoned. In particular, the name is used for the banknotes issued during the hyperinflation period in Germany in 1922 and especially 1923. The German papiermark was issued by the Free City of Danzig during this period. The last of five series of Danzig mark was the 1923 inflation issue, which consisted of 1 million (8 August), 10 million (31 August), 100 million (22 September), 500 million (26 September), and 5 billion and 10 billion mark notes (11 October). The Danzig mark was replaced on 22 October 1923 by the Danzig gulden, issued by the Danzig Central Finance Department.

Other denominations:

Credit: Free City of Danzig; photographed by Andrew Shiva

German Papiermark

Papiermark is the name given to the German currency from 4 August 1914, when the link between the Goldmark and gold was abandoned. In particular, the name is used for the banknotes issued during the hyperinflation period in Germany in 1922 and especially 1923. The German papiermark was issued by the Free City of Danzig during this period. The last of five series of Danzig mark was the 1923 inflation issue, which consisted of 1 million (8 August), 10 million (31 August), 100 million (22 September), 500 million (26 September), and 5 billion and 10 billion mark notes (11 October). The Danzig mark was replaced on 22 October 1923 by the Danzig gulden, issued by the Danzig Central Finance Department.

Other denominations:

Credit: Free City of Danzig; photographed by Andrew Shiva

German Papiermark

Papiermark is the name given to the German currency from 4 August 1914, when the link between the Goldmark and gold was abandoned. In particular, the name is used for the banknotes issued during the hyperinflation period in Germany in 1922 and especially 1923. The German papiermark was issued by the Free City of Danzig during this period. The last of five series of Danzig mark was the 1923 inflation issue, which consisted of 1 million (8 August), 10 million (31 August), 100 million (22 September), 500 million (26 September), and 5 billion and 10 billion mark notes (11 October). The Danzig mark was replaced on 22 October 1923 by the Danzig gulden, issued by the Danzig Central Finance Department.

Other denominations:

Credit: Free City of Danzig; photographed by Andrew Shiva

German Papiermark

Papiermark is the name given to the German currency from 4 August 1914, when the link between the Goldmark and gold was abandoned. In particular, the name is used for the banknotes issued during the hyperinflation period in Germany in 1922 and especially 1923. The German papiermark was issued by the Free City of Danzig during this period. The last of five series of Danzig mark was the 1923 inflation issue, which consisted of 1 million (8 August), 10 million (31 August), 100 million (22 September), 500 million (26 September), and 5 billion and 10 billion mark notes (11 October). The Danzig mark was replaced on 22 October 1923 by the Danzig gulden, issued by the Danzig Central Finance Department.

Other denominations:

Credit: Free City of Danzig; photographed by Andrew Shiva

German Papiermark

Papiermark is the name given to the German currency from 4 August 1914, when the link between the Goldmark and gold was abandoned. In particular, the name is used for the banknotes issued during the hyperinflation period in Germany in 1922 and especially 1923. The German papiermark was issued by the Free City of Danzig during this period. The last of five series of Danzig mark was the 1923 inflation issue, which consisted of 1 million (8 August), 10 million (31 August), 100 million (22 September), 500 million (26 September), and 5 billion and 10 billion mark notes (11 October). The Danzig mark was replaced on 22 October 1923 by the Danzig gulden, issued by the Danzig Central Finance Department.

Other denominations:

Credit: Free City of Danzig; photographed by Andrew Shiva


August 14

Elsie Leslie

Elsie Leslie (August 14, 1881 – October 31, 1966) was an American actress, the country's first child star and the highest paid and most popular child actress of her era. She came to prominence in 1887 with her performance in Editha's Burglar opposite E. H. Sothern at the Lyceum Theatre in New York. She achieved further fame with her roles in Little Lord Fauntleroy in 1888 and The Prince and the Pauper in 1890. She was a great letter writer, maintaining a correspondence with leading actors, actresses and statesmen. Although most of her correspondents were adult, two were girls nearer her own age: Eleanor Roosevelt and Helen Keller. She took a break from acting, returning to the stage in 1898, but did not manage to recapture the old magic as an adult. This photograph from 1899 shows her playing Lydia Languish in Richard Brinsley Sheridan's play "The Rivals".

Photograph credit: Zaida Ben-Yusuf; restored by Adam Cuerden


August 15

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (15 August 1875 – 1 September 1912) was an English composer and conductor. His greatest success was his cantata Hiawatha's Wedding Feast. This set the epic poem, The Song of Hiawatha by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, to music, and was widely performed by choral groups in England and the United States. Composers were not well paid; the work sold hundreds of thousands of copies, but Coleridge-Taylor had sold the music outright for the sum of 15 guineas, so did not benefit directly. He learned to retain his rights and earned royalties for other compositions after achieving wide renown but always struggled financially.

Unknown photographer; restored by Adam Cuerden


August 16

St. Joan of Arc Chapel

The 15th century St. Joan of Arc Chapel was initially built in the village of Chasse-sur-Rhône, France. Originally called the "Chapelle de St. Martin de Seyssuel", it is said to have been the place at which Joan of Arc prayed in 1429 after she had met with King Charles VII of France. The present name was given to the chapel when in 1927 Gertrude Hill Gavin, the daughter of an American railroad magnate, had the derelict building dismantled, transported to America and rebuilt beside her French Renaissance-style château in Brookville, New York. When in 1962 the château burned down, the chapel remained unscathed, and was later gifted to Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, once more being transported stone by stone.

Photograph credit: Leroy Skalstad


August 17

Pacu jawi

The pacu jawi is a traditional bull race in Tanah Datar, West Sumatra, Indonesia. In the race, a jockey stands holding on to a pair of loosely-tied bulls while the bulls run across a muddy track in a rice field. Recently, it has become a tourist attraction supported by the government and the subject of multiple award-winning photographs. Dramatic high-speed action, mud splashing, and the distinctive jockey facial expression add to its aesthetic value.

Photograph credit: Rodney Ee


August 18

Alice Paul

Alice Stokes Paul was an American suffragist, feminist, and women's rights activist, and one of the main leaders and strategists of the campaign for the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which prohibits sex discrimination in the right to vote. Paul, along with Lucy Burns and others, strategized events such as the Woman Suffrage Procession and the Silent Sentinels as part of the successful campaign that resulted in the amendment's passage one hundred years ago today, in 1920.

Credit: Harris & Ewing, restored by Adam Cuerden

August 19

Gaillardia pulchella

Gaillardia pulchella is a North American species of short-lived perennial or annual flowering plant in the sunflower family. It is often known as the Indian blanketflower, perhaps because of the resemblance of the inflorescence to the brightly patterned blankets made by Native Americans. It is a drought-tolerant plant native to northern Mexico and the southern United States, often carpeting fields and the sides of highways for miles in the summer and fall.

Photograph credit: Rhododendrites


August 20

The featured picture for this day has not yet been chosen.
In general, pictures of the day are scheduled in order of promotion to featured status. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for full guidelines.

August 21

Geostationary orbit

A geostationary orbit is a circular geosynchronous orbit 35,786 kilometres (22,236 miles) above Earth's equator and following the direction of Earth's rotation. An object in such an orbit has an orbital period equal to the Earth's rotational period, and appears to a ground-based observer to occupy a fixed position in the sky. Some 300 kilometres (190 miles) further away from Earth is the graveyard orbit, used for satellites at the end of their operational life to reduce the probability of them colliding with other spacecraft and generating space debris. This diagram compares these orbits with GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and COMPASS (medium Earth orbit satellites) orbits, and those of the International Space Station, the Hubble Space Telescope and the nominal size of the Earth.

Illustration credit: Cmglee

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August 22

The Bagnio

The Bagnio is the fifth of a series of six paintings by English painter and pictorial satirist William Hogarth, created around 1743. The set is called Marriage A-la-Mode and depicts an arranged marriage and its disastrous consequences. The pictures are exhibited in the National Gallery, London.

In this picture, the young earl catches his wife with her lover, Silvertongue, and is fatally wounded by the lawyer. The setting is the Turk's Head Bagnio in Covent Garden, originally a coffee house which offered Turkish baths, but by Hogarth's time, a place where rooms could be taken for the night with no questions asked. As the murderer makes his escape in his nightshirt through the window, the countess begs forgiveness from the dying man. Meanwhile, the noise of the fight has awakened the master of the house who appears through the door on the right with the Watch.

Painting credit: William Hogarth


August 23

Common blue butterflies mating

Common blue butterflies (Polyommatus icarus) mating on Yoesden Bank, Buckinghamshire, England. The male is on the left) and female on the right.

photograph by Charlesjsharp

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August 24

Charles Follen McKim

Charles Follen McKim (August 24, 1847 – September 4, 1909) was an American Beaux-Arts architect of the late 19th century. Along with William Rutherford Mead and Stanford White, he provided the architectural expertise as a member of the partnership McKim, Mead & White.

Photograph credit: Frances Benjamin Johnston; restored by Adam Cuerden


August 25

The featured picture for this day has not yet been chosen.
In general, pictures of the day are scheduled in order of promotion to featured status. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for full guidelines.

August 26

The featured picture for this day has not yet been chosen.
In general, pictures of the day are scheduled in order of promotion to featured status. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for full guidelines.

August 27

The featured picture for this day has not yet been chosen.
In general, pictures of the day are scheduled in order of promotion to featured status. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for full guidelines.

August 28

The featured picture for this day has not yet been chosen.
In general, pictures of the day are scheduled in order of promotion to featured status. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for full guidelines.

August 29

The featured picture for this day has not yet been chosen.
In general, pictures of the day are scheduled in order of promotion to featured status. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for full guidelines.

August 30

The featured picture for this day has not yet been chosen.
In general, pictures of the day are scheduled in order of promotion to featured status. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for full guidelines.

August 31

Bank myna

Bank myna (Acridotheres ginginianus). Today is a Bank Holiday in England.

Photograph by Charlesjsharp

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Picture of the day archive

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