New York's 12th congressional district

New York's 12th congressional district is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives located in New York City. It is now represented by Democrat Carolyn Maloney.

New York's 12th congressional district
New York US Congressional District 12 (since 2013).tif
New York's 12th congressional district since January 3, 2013
Representative
  Carolyn Maloney
DManhattan
Distribution
  • 100% urban
  • 0% rural
Population (2019)725,760[1]
Median household
income
$124,502[2]
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+34[3]

The district includes several neighborhoods in the East Side of Manhattan, the Greenpoint section of Brooklyn, and western Queens, as well as Roosevelt Island, mostly overlapping the pre-redistricting 14th district.[4] The 12th district's per capita income, in excess of $75,000, is the highest among all congressional districts in the United States.[5] Former President Donald Trump's former[6] primary independent residence, Trump Tower, is located in the district.

Recent election results from presidential racesEdit

Year Office Results
2008 President Obama 80 – 19%
2012 President Obama 77 – 22%
2016 President Clinton 83 -14%
2020 President Biden 84 -15%

Components: past and presentEdit

During the Civil War, the 12th District comprised the counties of Dutchess and Columbia.[7] The 12th District eventually became a Brooklyn district in the mid-1960s, as the result of a district realignment due to the Supreme Court's decision in the Cooper v. Power case in 1966. The district was realigned to include majority African American neighborhoods such as Bedford-Stuyvesant in Central Brooklyn. Until 1992, it was the Central Brooklyn district now held by Yvette Clarke (and formerly by Major Owens), and then remapped to include Hispanic neighborhoods in Lower Manhattan and Queens.

1803–1913:

Dutchess County, Columbia County

1913–1945:

Parts of Manhattan

1945–1993:

Parts of Brooklyn

1993–present:

Parts of Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens

Various New York districts have been numbered "12" over the years, including areas in New York City and various parts of Upstate New York.

HistoryEdit

From 2003 to 2013 it included parts of Brooklyn, Queens, and Manhattan. It included the Queens neighborhoods of Maspeth, Ridgewood, and Woodside; the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Bushwick, Greenpoint, Red Hook, East New York, Brooklyn Heights, Sunset Park, and Williamsburg; and part of Manhattan's Lower East Side and East Village.

List of members representing the districtEdit

1803–1813: One seatEdit

Representative Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history
District created March 4, 1803
 
David Thomas
Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1803 –
February 17, 1808[a]
8th
9th
10th
Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 1802.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Resigned to become New York State Treasurer.
Vacant February 17, 1808 –
November 7, 1808
10th
Nathan Wilson Democratic-
Republican
November 7, 1808 –
March 3, 1809
Elected to finish Thomas's term.
Retired.
 
Erastus Root
Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1809 –
March 3, 1811
11th Elected in 1808.
[data unknown/missing]
Arunah Metcalf Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1811 –
March 3, 1813
12th Re-elected in 1810.
[data unknown/missing]

1813–1823: two seatsEdit

From 1813 to 1823, two seats were apportioned to the District, elected at-large on a general ticket.

Cong
ress
Years Seat A Seat B Location
Representative Party Electoral history Representative Party Electoral history
13th March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1815
Zebulon R. Shipherd Federalist Elected in 1812.
[data unknown/missing]
Elisha I. Winter Federalist Elected in 1812.
[data unknown/missing]
1813–1823
Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Washington and Warren counties
14th March 4, 1815 –
December 7, 1815
Vacant Member-elect Benjamin Pond died October 6, 1814.  
John Savage
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1814.
[data unknown/missing]
December 7, 1815 –
March 3, 1817
Asa Adgate Democratic-Republican Elected to finish Pond's term.
[data unknown/missing]
15th March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1819
John Palmer Democratic-Republican Elected in 1816.
[data unknown/missing]
16th March 4, 1819 –
March 3, 1821
Ezra C. Gross Democratic-Republican Elected in 1818.
Lost re-election.
Nathaniel Pitcher Democratic-Republican Elected in 1818.
Re-elected in 1821.
[data unknown/missing]
17th March 4, 1821 –
December 3, 1821
Vacant Elections were held in April 1821. It is unclear when results were announced or credentials issued.
December 3, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
 
Reuben H. Walworth
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1821.

1823 – present: One seatEdit

Representative Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history Location
Lewis Eaton Democratic-Republican March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
18th Elected in 1822.
[data unknown/missing]
1823–1833
Schenectady and Schoharie counties
William Dietz Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
19th Elected in 1824.
[data unknown/missing]
 
John I. De Graff
Jacksonian March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1829
20th Elected in 1826.
[data unknown/missing]
Peter I. Borst Jacksonian March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1831
21st Elected in 1828.
[data unknown/missing]
Joseph Bouck Jacksonian March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1833
22nd Elected in 1830.
[data unknown/missing]
Henry C. Martindale Anti-Masonic March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1835
23rd Elected in 1832.
[data unknown/missing]
1833–1843
[data unknown/missing]
David Abel Russell Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
24th
25th
26th
Elected in 1834.
Re-elected in 1836.
Re-elected in 1838.
[data unknown/missing]
Whig March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1841
 
Bernard Blair
Whig March 4, 1841 –
March 3, 1843
27th Elected in 1840.
[data unknown/missing]
 
David L. Seymour
Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
28th Elected in 1842.
[data unknown/missing]
1843–1853
[data unknown/missing]
Richard P. Herrick Whig March 4, 1845 –
June 20, 1846
29th Elected in 1844.
Died.
Vacant June 20, 1846 –
December 7, 1846
Thomas C. Ripley Whig December 7, 1846 –
March 3, 1847
Elected to finish Herrick's term.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Gideon Reynolds
Whig March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1851
30th
31st
Elected in 1846.
Re-elected in 1848.
[data unknown/missing]
 
David L. Seymour
Democratic March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
32nd Elected in 1850.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Gilbert Dean
Democratic March 4, 1853 –
July 3, 1854
33rd Redistricted from 8th district and re-elected in 1852.
Resigned to become justice to Supreme Court of New York.
1853–1863
[data unknown/missing]
Vacant July 3, 1854 –
November 7, 1854
Isaac Teller Whig November 7, 1854 –
March 3, 1855
Elected to finish Dean's term.
[data unknown/missing]
Killian Miller Opposition March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th Elected in 1854.
[data unknown/missing]
 
John Thompson
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
35th Elected in 1856.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Charles Lewis Beale
Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
36th Elected in 1858.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Stephen Baker
Republican March 4, 1861 –
March 3, 1863
37th Elected in 1860.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Homer A. Nelson
Democratic March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1865
38th Elected in 1862.
[data unknown/missing]
1863–1873
[data unknown/missing]
 
John H. Ketcham
Republican March 4, 1865 –
March 3, 1873
39th
40th
41st
42nd
Re-elected in 1864.
Re-elected in 1866.
Re-elected in 1868.
Re-elected in 1870.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Charles St. John
Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
43rd Redistricted from 11th district and re-elected in 1872.
[data unknown/missing]
1873–1883
[data unknown/missing]
 
N. Holmes Odell
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
44th Elected in 1874.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Clarkson Nott Potter
Democratic March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1879
45th Elected in 1876.
[data unknown/missing]
Vacant March 3, 1879 –
November 3, 1879
46th Representative-elect Alexander Smith died November 5, 1878.
 
Waldo Hutchins
Democratic November 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1885
46th
47th
48th
Elected to finish Smith's term.
Re-elected in 1880.
Re-elected in 1882.
Retired.
1883–1893
[data unknown/missing]
 
Abraham Dowdney
Democratic March 4, 1885 –
December 10, 1886
49th Elected in 1884.
Died.
Vacant December 10, 1886 –
March 3, 1887
 
William Bourke Cockran
Democratic March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1889
50th Elected in 1886.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Roswell P. Flower
Democratic March 4, 1889 –
September 16, 1891
51st
52nd
Elected in 1888.
Re-elected in 1890.
Resigned to become Governor of New York.
Vacant September 16, 1891 –
November 3, 1891
52nd
 
Joseph J. Little
Democratic November 3, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
Elected to finish Flower's term.
[data unknown/missing]
 
William Bourke Cockran
Democratic March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1895
53rd Redistricted from 10th district and re-elected in 1892.
[data unknown/missing]
1893–1903
[data unknown/missing]
 
George B. McClellan Jr.
Democratic March 4, 1895 –
December 21, 1903
54th
55th
56th
57th
58th
Elected in 1894.
Re-elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Resigned to become Mayor of New York City.
1903–1913
[data unknown/missing]
Vacant December 21, 1903 –
February 23, 1904
58th
 
William Bourke Cockran
Democratic February 23, 1904 –
March 3, 1909
58th
59th
60th
Elected to finish McClellan's term.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Michael F. Conry
Democratic March 4, 1909 –
March 3, 1913
61st
62nd
Elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Redistricted to 15th district.
 
Henry M. Goldfogle
Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1915
63rd Redistricted from 9th district and re-elected in 1912.
.
1913–1923
[data unknown/missing]
 
Meyer London
Socialist March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1919
64th
65th
Elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Henry M. Goldfogle
Democratic March 4, 1919 –
March 3, 1921
66th Elected in 1918.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Meyer London
Socialist March 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1923
67th Elected in 1920.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Samuel Dickstein
Democratic March 4, 1923 –
January 3, 1945
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
Elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Redistricted to 19th district.
1923–1933
[data unknown/missing]
1933–1943
[data unknown/missing]
1943–1953
[data unknown/missing]
 
John J. Rooney
Democratic January 3, 1945 –
January 3, 1953
79th
80th
81st
82nd
Redistricted from 4th district and re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Redistricted to 14th district.
 
Francis E. Dorn
Republican January 3, 1953 –
January 3, 1961
83rd
84th
85th
86th
Elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
[data unknown/missing]
1953–1963
[data unknown/missing]
 
Hugh Carey
Democratic January 3, 1961 –
January 3, 1963
87th Elected in 1960.
Redistricted to 15th district.
 
Edna F. Kelly
Democratic January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1969
88th
89th
90th
Redistricted from 10th district and re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
[data unknown/missing]
1963–1973
[data unknown/missing]
 
Shirley Chisholm
Democratic January 3, 1969 –
January 3, 1983
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
Elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Retired.
1973–1983
[data unknown/missing]
 
Major Owens
Democratic January 3, 1983 –
January 3, 1993
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
Elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Redistricted to 11th district.
1983–1993
[data unknown/missing]
 
Nydia Velázquez
Democratic January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 2013
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
Elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Redistricted to 7th district.
1993–2013
[data unknown/missing]
 
Carolyn Maloney
Democratic January 3, 2013 –
Present
113th
114th
115th
116th
117th
Redistricted from 14th district and re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.
2013–Present
[data unknown/missing]

Recent electionsEdit

In New York, are numerous minor parties at various points on the political spectrum. Certain parties will invariably endorse either the Republican or Democratic candidate for every office, hence the state electoral results contain both the party votes, and the final candidate votes (Listed as "Recap").

US House election, 1996: New York District 12
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Nydia Velazquez (incumbent) 61,913 84.6
Republican Miguel I. Prado 9,978 13.6
Socialist Workers Eleanor Garcia 1,283 1.8
Majority 51,935 71.0
Turnout 73,174 100
US House election, 1998: New York District 12
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Nydia Velazquez (incumbent) 53,269 83.6 -1.0
Republican Rosemary Markgraf 7,405 11.6 -2.0
Conservative Angel Diaz 1,632 2.6 +2.6
Liberal Hector Cortes, Jr. 1,400 2.2 +2.2
Majority 45,864 72.0 +1.0
Turnout 63,706 100 -12.9
US House election, 2000: New York District 12
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Nydia Velazquez (incumbent) 86,288 87.1 +3.5
Republican Rosemary Markgraf 10,052 10.1 -1.5
Socialist Paul Pederson 1,025 1.0 +1.0
New York State Right to Life Party Mildred Rosario 865 0.9 +0.9
Conservative Cesar Estevez 850 0.9 -1.7
Majority 76,236 76.9 +4.9
Turnout 99,080 100 +55.5
US House election, 2002: New York District 12
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Nydia Velazquez (incumbent) 48,408 95.8 +8.7
Conservative Cesar Estevez 2,119 4.2 +3.3
Majority 46,289 91.6 +14.7
Turnout 50,527 100 -49.0
US House election, 2004: New York District 12
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Nydia Velazquez (incumbent) 107,796 86.3 -9.5
Republican Paul A. Rodriguez 17,166 13.7 +13.7
Majority 90,630 72.5 -19.1
Turnout 124,962 100 +147.3
US House election, 2006: New York District 12
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Nydia Velazquez (incumbent) 62,847 89.7 +3.4
Republican Allan E. Romaguera 7,182 10.3 -3.4
Majority 55,665 79.5 +7.0
Turnout 70,029 100 -44.0
US House election, 2008: New York District 12
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Nydia Velazquez (incumbent) 123,053 90.0 +0.3
Republican Allan E. Romaguera 13,748 10.0 -0.3
Majority 109,305 80.0 +0.5
Turnout 136,801 100 +95.3
US House election, 2010: New York District 12
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Nydia Velazquez (incumbent) 68,624 93.9 +3.9
Conservative Alice Gaffney 4,482 6.1 +6.1
Majority 64,142 87.7 +7.7
Turnout 73,106 100 -46.6
US House election, 2012: New York District 12
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Carolyn Maloney 193,455 72.1 -21.8
Republican Christopher Wight 46,692 17.4 +7.4
Majority 109,305 54.7 -33.0
Turnout 268,287 100 +366.9
US House election, 2014: New York District 12
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Carolyn Maloney (incumbent) 90,603 77.2 +5.1
Republican Nick Di Iorio 22,731 19.4 +2.0
Majority 67,872 57.8 +3.1
Turnout 117,420 100 -228.5
US House election, 2016: New York District 12
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Carolyn Maloney (incumbent) 244,358 83.2 +6.0
Republican Robert Ardini 49,398 16.8 -2.6
Majority 194,960 66.4 +8.6
Turnout 293,756 100 +250.2
US House election, 2018: New York District 12
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Carolyn Maloney (incumbent) 217,430 86.4 +3.2
Republican Eliot Rabin 30,446 12.1 -4.7
Green Scott Hutchins 3,728 1.5 N/A
Majority 186,984 74.3 +12.1
Turnout 251,604 100 -16.8
US House election, 2020: New York District 12
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Carolyn Maloney (incumbent) 265,172 82.0 -4.4
Republican Carlos Santiago-Cano 53,061 16.0 +3.9
Libertarian Steven Kolln 4,015 1.0 N/A
Majority 208,096 65.0 -9.3
Turnout 322,248 100 +28.1

Historical district boundariesEdit

 
2003 – 2013

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ "New York congressional districts by urban and rural population and land area". United States Census Bureau. June 8, 2017. Archived from the original on November 21, 2019. Retrieved November 21, 2019.
  2. ^ Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP), US Census Bureau. "My Congressional District". www.census.gov.
  3. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 117th Congress". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  4. ^ "New York Redistricting". New York Times. March 20, 2012. Retrieved May 13, 2012.
  5. ^ "Highest Income Per Capita In The United States By Congressional District".
  6. ^ "Donald Trump changes primary residence from New York to Mar-a-Lago". The Guardian. November 1, 2019.
  7. ^ "Ancestry.ca". www.ancestry.ca. Retrieved November 3, 2020.
  8. ^ Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States (Vol. V; page 182)
  1. ^ David Thomas was appointed New York State Treasurer on February 5, 1808, and resigned his seat. His letter of resignation was read in the House on February 17.[8]

ReferencesEdit

Preceded by Home district of the President of the United States
January 20, 2017 – September 27, 2019
Succeeded by