Open main menu

New York's congressional districts

Map of New York's congressional districts since 2013[1]

The U.S. state of New York currently comprises 27 congressional districts. Each district elects one member of the United States House of Representatives who sits on its behalf.[2] The state was redistricted in 2013, following the 2010 U.S. Census; it lost two seats in Congress.[3]

Contents

Current districts and representativesEdit

List of members of the New York United States House delegation, district boundaries, and district political ratings according to the CPVI. The delegation has a total of 27 members, with 21 Democrats and 6 Republicans as of 2018.

District CPVI Representative
(Residence)
Party In office since District map
1st R+5  
Lee Zeldin
(Shirley)
Republican January 3, 2015  
2nd R+3  
Peter King
(Seaford)
Republican January 3, 1993  
3rd D+1  
Thomas Suozzi
(Glen Cove)
Democratic January 3, 2017  
4th D+4  
Kathleen Rice
(Garden City)
Democratic January 3, 2015  
5th D+37  
Gregory Meeks
(Queens)
Democratic February 3, 1998  
6th D+16  
Grace Meng
(Queens)
Democratic January 3, 2013  
7th D+38  
Nydia Velázquez
(Brooklyn)
Democratic January 3, 1993  
8th D+36  
Hakeem Jeffries
(Brooklyn)
Democratic January 3, 2013  
9th D+34  
Yvette Clarke
(Brooklyn)
Democratic January 3, 2007  
10th D+26  
Jerry Nadler
(Manhattan)
Democratic November 3, 1992  
11th R+3  
Max Rose
(Staten Island)
Democratic January 3, 2019  
12th D+31  
Carolyn Maloney
(Manhattan)
Democratic January 3, 1993  
13th D+43  
Adriano Espaillat
(Manhattan)
Democratic January 3, 2017  
14th D+29  
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez
(Bronx)
Democratic January 3, 2019  
15th D+44  
José E. Serrano
(Bronx)
Democratic March 20, 1990  
16th D+24  
Eliot Engel
(Bronx)
Democratic January 3, 1989  
17th D+7  
Nita Lowey
(Harrison)
Democratic January 3, 1989  
18th R+1  
Sean Maloney
(Carmel)
Democratic January 3, 2013  
19th R+2  
Antonio Delgado
(Rhinebeck)
Democratic January 3, 2019  
20th D+7  
Paul Tonko
(Amsterdam)
Democratic January 3, 2009  
21st R+4  
Elise Stefanik
(Willsboro)
Republican January 3, 2015  
22nd R+6  
Anthony Brindisi
(Utica)
Democratic January 3, 2019  
23rd R+6  
Tom Reed
(Corning)
Republican November 2, 2010  
24th D+3  
John Katko
(Camillus)
Republican January 3, 2015  
25th D+8  
Joseph Morelle
(Irondequoit)
Democratic November 13, 2018  
26th D+11  
Brian Higgins
(Buffalo)
Democratic January 3, 2005  
27th R+11  
Chris Collins
(Clarence)
Republican January 3, 2013  

Historical district locationsEdit

Note A: There are now 62 counties in New York (state). The counties that are not mentioned in this list had not yet been established, or sufficiently organized.

Note B: For the 1789 through 1796 elections, districts were named by the counties that comprised them, without applying a numbering system. For those elections, numbers were retroactively back-numbered for the districts.

1789 electionsEdit

On January 27, 1789, the New York State Legislature divided the State of New York into six congressional districts which were not numbered.[4]

1790 electionsEdit

The districts remained the same as for the previous elections in March 1789.

1793 electionsEdit

On December 18, 1792, the Legislature divided the State into ten districts, which were still not numbered, taking into account the new counties created in 1791.

1794 electionsEdit

The congressional districts remained at this election the same as at the previous election, only inside the tenth district a new county, Onondaga, was created in 1794.

1796 electionsEdit

The geographical area of the congressional districts remained at this election the same as at the previous election in December 1794. A new county was created, Schoharie County Most of the new Schoharie County was taken from Albany County, and remained in the 8th district, a part was taken from Otsego County, and remained in the 10th district. Besides, inside the 10th district a new county had been created: Steuben County.

1798 electionsEdit

On March 27, 1797, the Legislature re-apportioned the districts, taking into account the new counties which had been created in the meanwhile, and for the first time the districts were numbered.

1800 electionsEdit

The districts remained the same as at the previous election in April 1798, but two new counties were created in 1799: in the 7th district, Essex County was split from Clinton County; and in the 10th district, Cayuga County was split from Onondaga County.

1802 electionsEdit

Until the previous elections, there had been ten congressional districts. After the U.S. census of 1800, Congress re-apportioned the seats, and New York's representation was increased to 17. On March 30, 1802, the New York State Legislature re-apportioned the congressional districts, dividing New York County seemingly at random into two districts.

1804 electionsEdit

After the election of one Democratic-Republican and one Federalist in 1802, the Democratic-Republican majority in the State Legislature gerrymandered the two districts together in an Act passed on March 20, 1804, so that two congressmen would be elected on a general ticket by the voters of both districts, assuring the election of two Democratic-Republicans.

Besides, Seneca County was split from Cayuga County inside the 17th district.

1806 electionsEdit

Three new counties had been created since the last elections in 1804: inside the 15th district, Jefferson County was split off from Oneida County; in the 16th district, Madison County from Chenango County; and in the 17th district, Allegany County from Genesee County The area of the districts remained the same.

1808 electionsEdit

On April 8, 1808, the State Legislature re-apportioned the districts again, separating the 2nd and the 3rd district, and creating two districts with two seats each to be filled on a general ticket: the 2nd and the 6th.

David Thomas had been elected in the old 12th district which had comprised only Washington County, so the vacancy was filled by a special election held only in this county, while at the same time two representatives were elected on a general ticket in the new 6th district to which Washington County had been re-districted together with Columbia County and Rensselaer County.

Due to the double-seat districts, there were then only 15 districts; the 16th and 17th were eliminated.

Note: There are now 62 counties in the State of New York. The counties which are not mentioned in this list had not yet been established, or sufficiently organized, the area being included in one or more of the above-mentioned counties.

1810 electionsEdit

The districts remained the same as at the previous elections in 1808. Only four new counties were created inside some districts: in the 5th district, Sullivan County was split from Ulster County; in the 7th district, Schenectady County was split from Albany County; in the 8th district, Franklin County was split from Clinton County; and in the 15th district, Niagara County was split from Genesee County.

1812 electionsEdit

Due to the increase in seats, the previously eliminated 16th and 17th district were re-established, and four more districts were created. Six districts had two members, elected districtwide on a general ticket.

1814 electionsEdit

For the 1814 elections, the districts remained the same as at the previous elections in 1812, only one new county was created: in the 12th district, Warren County was split from Washington County.

1816 electionsEdit

For the 1816 elections, there was no change.

1818 electionsEdit

For the 1818 elections, the geographical area of the districts remained the same as at the previous elections in 1816. Two new counties were created: Tompkins inside the 20th district; and Cattaraugus inside the 21st district. In 1817, the Town of Danube was separated from the Town of Minden in Montgomery County, and transferred to Herkimer County, but Danube remained in the 14th district.

1821 electionsEdit

For the 1821 elections, except for the split of the 21st district, the geographical area of the congressional districts remained the same as at the previous elections in 1818. Five new counties had been created. Hamilton County was split from Montgomery County inside the 14th district. Oswego County was created from parts of Oneida and Onondaga counties, but the parts remained in their previous congressional districts. On March 9, 1821, the New York State Legislature divided the 21st district in two districts: Ontario County and the newly created Monroe County remained as the 21st district; the remainder became the new 22nd district, including the new counties of Erie and Livingston.

1822 electionsEdit

On April 17, 1822, the New York State Legislature re-apportioned the congressional districts according to the figures of the 1820 United States census. The number of district was increased to 30, creating eight new districts; the number of seats was increased to 34, creating for the first time a triple-seat district, and keeping two double-seat districts.

1824 electionsEdit

The geographical area of the congressional districts remained the same as at the previous elections in 1822. Two new counties were created within the 26th district: Wayne County and Yates County.

1826 electionsEdit

The geographical area of the congressional districts remained the same as at the previous elections in 1824. Only one new county was created: in the 29th district, Orleans County was split from Genesee County.

2002 electionsEdit

Obsolete districtsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The national atlas". nationalatlas.gov. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved February 2, 2014.
  2. ^ 2 U.S.C. § 2c
  3. ^ "New Congressional Lines Imposed by Federal Court". New York Times. Retrieved June 27, 2012.
  4. ^ The numbers which are used nowadays to describe these districts at this time derive from the numbers of the districts officially introduced in 1797, considering the sequence of the districts in the official listing and the approximate geographical equivalence.
  5. ^ a b In the Act of March 23, 1797, the Towns of Clarkstown, Haverstraw, Hempsted and Orangetown are mentioned. These towns were split from Orange County in 1798, before the election, to form Rockland County.

External linksEdit