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New York's 19th congressional district

United States House of Representatives, New York District 19 is located in New York's Hudson Valley and Catskills regions. District 19 lies partially in the northernmost region of the New York metropolitan area and mostly south of Albany. It is currently represented by Democrat Antonio Delgado.

New York's 19th congressional district
New York US Congressional District 19 (since 2013).tif
New York 's 19th congressional district, since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Antonio Delgado
DRhinebeck
Median income$61,662[1]
Cook PVIR+2[2]

After redistricting in 2012, the 19th district comprises all of Columbia, Delaware, Greene, Otsego, Schoharie, Sullivan, and Ulster counties, and parts of Broome, Dutchess, Montgomery, and Rensselaer counties. President Obama won the new district by 6.2% in 2012. The current 19th District is largely a merger between the former 20th and 22nd Congressional Districts.

From 2003 to 2013, the 19th was composed of parts of Dutchess, Orange, Rockland, and Westchester Counties, in addition to the entirety of Putnam County. Much of this district is now the 18th District, while the current 19th is essentially the successor of the former 20th District.

Incumbent 19th district representative Nan Hayworth opted to follow most of her constituents into the new 18th, but was defeated by Democrat Sean Patrick Maloney, a former advisor to President Bill Clinton.[3] Most of the old 19th district is now part of the 18th district.[4] Meanwhile, incumbent 20th district representative Chris Gibson ran for re-election in the new 19th and won. On January 5, 2015, per his pledge when first elected not to serve more than four terms, Gibson announced that he would not run for re-election in 2016.[5]

In 2016, Democrat Zephyr Teachout was defeated by Republican John Faso in the November 8th election.[6] In 2018, Faso was defeated after only one term by Democrat Antonio Delgado.

Recent election results from presidential racesEdit

Year Results
1992 George H. W. Bush 42 - 40%
1996 Bill Clinton 48 - 41%
2000 George W. Bush 49 - 47%
2004 George W. Bush 54 - 45%
2008 Barack Obama 53 - 45%
2012 Barack Obama 52.1 - 45.9%
2016 Donald Trump 50.8 - 44.0%

Components: past and presentEdit

 
The district from 2003 to 2013

1873-1875:

Montgomery

1913-1983:

Parts of Manhattan

1983-1993:

Parts of Bronx, Westchester

1993-2003:

All of Putnam
Parts of Dutchess, Orange, Westchester

2003–2013:

All of Putnam
Parts of Dutchess, Orange, Rockland, Westchester

2013–present:

All of Columbia, Delaware, Greene, Otsego, Schoharie, Sullivan, Ulster
Parts of Broome, Dutchess, Montgomery, Rensselaer

Various New York districts have been numbered "19" over the years, including areas in New York City and various parts of upstate New York.

The 19th District was a Manhattan-based district until 1980. It then was the Bronx-Westchester seat now numbered the 17th District. The present 19th District was the 21st District prior to the 1990s, and prior to that was the 25th District.

List of members representing the districtEdit

Representative Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history
District created March 4, 1813
 
James Geddes
Federalist March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1815
13th Elected in 1812.
Lost re-election.
 
Victory Birdseye
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1817
14th Re-elected in 1814.
[Data unknown/missing.]
James Porter Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1819
15th Elected in 1816.
[Data unknown/missing.]
George Hall Democratic-Republican March 4, 1819 –
March 3, 1821
16th Elected in 1818.
Lost re-election.
Vacant March 4, 1821 –
December 3, 1821
Elections were held in April 1821. It is unclear when results were announced or credentials issued.
 
Elisha Litchfield
Democratic-Republican December 3, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
17th Elected in 1821.
Redistricted to the 23rd district.
John Richards Crawford DR March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
18th Elected in 1822.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Henry H. Ross Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
19th [Data unknown/missing.]
Richard Keese Jacksonian March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1829
20th [Data unknown/missing.]
Isaac Finch Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1831
21st [Data unknown/missing.]
William Hogan Jacksonian March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1833
22nd [Data unknown/missing.]
Sherman Page Jacksonian March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1837
23rd
24th
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
John H. Prentiss
Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1841
25th
26th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Samuel S. Bowne Democratic March 4, 1841 –
March 3, 1843
27th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Orville Hungerford
Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1847
28|29} [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Joseph Mullin
Whig March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1849
30th [Data unknown/missing.]
Charles E. Clarke Whig March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1851
31st [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Willard Ives
Democratic March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
32nd [Data unknown/missing.]
George W. Chase Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd [Data unknown/missing.]
Jonas A. Hughston Opposition March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Oliver A. Morse
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
35th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
James H. Graham
Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
36th [Data unknown/missing.]
Richard Franchot Republican March 4, 1861 –
March 3, 1863
37th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Samuel F. Miller
Republican March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1865
38th [Data unknown/missing.]
Demas Hubbard Jr. Republican March 4, 1865 –
March 3, 1867
39th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
William C. Fields
Republican March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1869
40th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Charles Knapp
Republican March 4, 1869 –
March 3, 1871
41st [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Elizur H. Prindle
Republican March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1873
42nd [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Henry H. Hathorn
Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
43rd [Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 20th district.
 
William A. Wheeler
Republican March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
44th Redistricted from the 18th district.
 
Amaziah B. James
Republican March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1881
45th
46th
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Abraham X. Parker
Republican March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1885
47th
48th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 22nd district.
 
John Swinburne
Republican March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1887
49th [Data unknown/missing.]
Nicholas T. Kane Democratic March 4, 1887 –
September 14, 1887
50th [Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant September 14, 1887 –
November 8, 1887
 
Charles Tracey
Democratic November 8, 1887 –
March 3, 1893
50th
51st
52nd
Elected to finish Kane's term.
Redistricted to the 20th district.
 
Charles D. Haines
Democratic March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1895
53rd [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Frank S. Black
Republican March 4, 1895 –
January 7, 1897
54th [Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned after being elected Governor of New York
Vacant January 7, 1897 –
March 3, 1897
 
Aaron Van Schaick Cochrane
Republican March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1901
55th
56th
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
William H. Draper
Republican March 4, 1901 –
March 3, 1903
57th [Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 22nd district.
 
Norton P. Otis
Republican March 4, 1903 –
February 20, 1905
58th [Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant February 20, 1905 –
March 3, 1905
 
John E. Andrus
Republican March 4, 1905 –
March 3, 1913
59th
60th
61st
62nd
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Walter M. Chandler
Progressive March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1917
63rd
64th
65th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Republican March 4, 1917 –
March 3, 1919
 
Joseph Rowan
Democratic March 4, 1919 –
March 3, 1921
66th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Walter M. Chandler
Republican March 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1923
67th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Sol Bloom
Democratic March 4, 1923[7]
January 3, 1945
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
Elected to fill the term when Representative-elect Samuel Marx died.
Redistricted to the 20th district.
 
Samuel Dickstein
Democratic January 3, 1945 –
December 30, 1945
79th Redistricted from the 12th district.
Resigned to become justice of the New York Supreme Court.
Vacant December 31, 1945 –
February 18, 1946
 
Arthur G. Klein
Democratic February 19, 1946 –
December 31, 1956
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
Elected to finish Dickstein's term.
Resigned to become justice on New York Supreme Court
Vacant January 1, 1957 –
January 2, 1957
 
Leonard Farbstein
Democratic January 3, 1957 –
January 3, 1971
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Bella Abzug
Democratic January 3, 1971 –
January 3, 1973
92nd [Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 20th district.
 
Charles Rangel
Democratic January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 1983
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
Redistricted from the 18th district.
Redistricted to the 16th district.
 
Mario Biaggi
Democratic January 3, 1983 –
August 5, 1988
98th
99th
100th
Redistricted from the 10th district.
Resigned.
Vacant August 6, 1988 –
January 2, 1989
 
Eliot Engel
Democratic January 3, 1989 –
January 3, 1993
101st
102nd
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 17th district.
 
Hamilton Fish IV
Republican January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 1995
103rd Redistricted from the 21st district.
 
Sue W. Kelly
Republican January 3, 1995 –
January 3, 2007
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
 
John Hall
Democratic January 3, 2007 –
January 3, 2011
110th
111th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
 
Nan Hayworth
Republican January 3, 2011 –
January 3, 2013
112th [Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 18th district and lost re-election.
 
Chris Gibson
Republican January 3, 2013 –
January 3, 2017
113th
114th
Redistricted from the 20th district and re-elected.
Re-elected in 2014.
Retired.
 
John Faso
Republican January 3, 2017 –
January 3, 2019
115th Elected in 2016.
Lost re-election.
 
Antonio Delgado
Democratic January 3, 2019 –
Present
116th Elected in 2018.

Election resultsEdit

Note that in New York State electoral politics there are numerous minor parties at various points on the political spectrum. Certain parties will endorse either the Republican or Democratic candidate for every office, hence the state electoral results contain both the party votes, and the final candidate votes (Listed as "Recap").

U.S. House election, 1996: New York District 19
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Sue W. Kelly 102,142 46.3
Democratic Richard S. Klein 86,926 39.4
Conservative Joseph J. DioGuardi 27,424 12.4
Independence William E. Haase 4,104 1.9
Majority 15,216 6.9
Turnout 220,596 100
U.S. House election, 1998: New York District 19
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Sue W. Kelly 104,467 62.2 +15.9
Democratic Dick Collins 56,378 33.6 -5.8
Right to Life Joseph J. DioGuardi 5,941 3.5 +3.5
Freedom Party Charles C. Williams 1,046 0.6 +0.6
Majority 48,089 28.7 +21.8
Turnout 167,832 100 -23.9
U.S. House election, 2000: New York District 19
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Sue W. Kelly 145,532 60.9 -1.3
Democratic Lawrence Otis Graham 85,871 35.9 +2.3
Right to Life Frank X. Lloyd 4,086 1.7 -1.8
Green Mark R. Jacobs 3,662 1.5 +1.5
Majority 59,661 24.9 -3.8
Turnout 239,151 100 +42.5
U.S. House election, 2002: New York District 19
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Sue W. Kelly 121,129 70.0 +9.1
Democratic Janine M. H. Selendy 44,967 26.0 -9.9
Right to Life Christine M. Tighe 4,374 2.5 +0.8
Green Jonathan M. Wright 2,642 1.5 -0.0
Majority 76,162 44.0 +19.1
Turnout 173,112 100 -27.6
U.S. House election, 2004: New York District 19
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Sue W. Kelly 175,401 66.7 -3.3
Democratic Michael Jaliman 87,429 33.3 +7.3
Majority 87,972 33.5 -10.5
Turnout 262,830 100 +51.8
U.S. House election, 2006: New York District 19
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic John Hall 100,119 51.2 +17.9
Republican Sue W. Kelly 95,359 48.8 -17.9
Majority 4,760 2.4 -31.1
Turnout 195,478 100 -25.6
U.S. House election, 2008: New York District 19[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic John Hall 164,859 58.7 +7.5
Republican Kieran Lalor 116,120 41.3 -7.5
Majority 48,739 17.3 14.9
Turnout 280,979 100 43.7
U.S. House election, 2010:[9] New York District 19
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Nan Hayworth 109,956 52.5 +11.2
Democratic John Hall 98,766 47.5 -11.2
Majority 11,190 5.3 -12
Turnout 209,285 100 -25.5
U.S. House election, 2012:[10] New York District 19
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Chris Gibson 149,763 52.9 .4
Democratic Julian Schreibman 133,567 47.1 -.4
Majority 16,196 5.7 .4
Turnout 283,303 100 35.4
U.S. House election, 2014:[11] New York District 19
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Chris Gibson 131,594 62.6 9.7
Democratic Sean Eldridge 72,470 34.5 -12.6
Majority 59,124 28.1 22.4
Turnout 210,351 100
U.S. House election, 2016:[12] New York District 19
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican John Faso 166,171 54.1 -8.5
Democratic Zephyr Teachout 141,224 45.9 +11.4
Majority 24,947 6.1 22.4
Turnout 307,395 100
U.S. House election, 2018: New York District 19
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Antonio Delgado 147,873 51.4 +5.5
Republican John Faso 132,873 46.1 -8
Majority 15,000 5.3 22.4
Turnout 287,894 100

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=36&cd=19
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. ^ "New York Times"
  4. ^ "Congressional District Comparison"
  5. ^ Chris Gibson won't run for reelection, Politico, January 5, 2015. Retrieved March 29, 2016.
  6. ^ Niedzwiadek, Nick (November 9, 2016). "Faso defeats Teachout as Republicans hold NY House seats". Politico. Retrieved November 13, 2016.
  7. ^ Bloom was elected January 30, 1923 for the term beginning March 4, 1923. The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress incorrectly states the beginning of his term as his election date.
  8. ^ "NYS Board of Elections Rep. in Congress Election Returns Nov. 4, 2008" (PDF). Retrieved December 8, 2008.
  9. ^ "NYS Board of Elections Rep. in Congress Election Returns Nov. 2, 2010" (PDF). Retrieved December 8, 2008.
  10. ^ "NYS Board of Elections Rep. in Congress Election Returns Nov. 6, 2012" (PDF). Retrieved September 25, 2013.
  11. ^ "NYS Board of Elections Rep. in Congress Election Returns Nov. 4, 2014" (PDF). Retrieved March 19, 2018.
  12. ^ "NYS Board of Elections Rep. in Congress Election Returns Nov. 8, 2016" (PDF). Retrieved March 19, 2018.

ReferencesEdit

Coordinates: 42°13′40″N 74°25′32″W / 42.22778°N 74.42556°W / 42.22778; -74.42556