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Pennsylvania's 13th congressional district

The 13th Congressional District of Pennsylvania is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The district contains all of Blair County, Huntingdon County, Bedford County, Fulton County, Franklin County, and Adams County. It also includes most of Somerset County, and parts of Westmoreland County, Cambria County, and Cumberland County. Republican John Joyce has represented the district since 2019.

Pennsylvania's 13th congressional district
Pennsylvania Congressional District 13.png
Boundaries since January 2019; below statistics, except PVI, apply to old boundaries
Representative
  John Joyce
RAltoona
Distribution
  • 98.46% urban
  • 1.54% rural
Population (2000)646,435
Median income49,319
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+22[1]

Prior to February 2018, the district was located in southeastern Pennsylvania, covering eastern Montgomery County and Northeast Philadelphia. The district traditionally included most of Montgomery County, but was redrawn in 2002 to include part of Philadelphia, and altered again in 2012. The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania redrew the district in February 2018 after ruling the previous map unconstitutional. The old 13th district became the 4th district, and what was the ninth district in the southwest part of the state was modified and redesignated the 13th district, for the 2018 elections and representation thereafter.[2]

The district had long been a Republican stronghold, like many suburban districts in the Northeast. However, the brand of Republicanism in this district was a moderate one, and the district (like the Philadelphia suburbs as a whole) became friendlier to Democrats during the 1990s as the national party veered to the right. The district has not voted Republican for President since 1988. In 1992, the district elected its first Democratic representative in 86 years, Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky. She was swept out in 1994 by Republican Jon D. Fox, but Joe Hoeffel regained the seat for the Democrats in 1998. It was in Democratic hands from then until the 2018 redistricting, and became even more Democratic since being pushed into Philadelphia after the 2000 census.

DemographicsEdit

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 647,435 people, 250,845 households, and 169,848 families residing in the district. The racial makeup of the district was 87.16% White, 6.05% Black or African American, 0.14% Native American, 4.05% Asian, 0.00% Pacific Islander, 1.32% from other races, and 1.24% from two or more races. 3.06% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 250,845 households out of which 30.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.3% were married couples living together, 10.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.3% were non-families. 27.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51] and the average family size was 3.09.

In the district, the population was spread out with 23.5% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 29.2% from 25 to 44, 22.9% from 45 to 64, and 17.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 92.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.2 males.

The median income for a household in the district was $49,319, and the median income for a family was $61,108. Males had a median income of $36,441 versus $23,719 for females. The per capita income for the district was $25,053. About 5.1% of families and 7.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.8% of those under age 18 and 8.5% of those age 65 or over.

List of members representing the districtEdit

Representative Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history
District created in 1813
Vacant March 4, 1813 –
May 13, 1813
Member-elect John Smilie was redistricted from the 9th district and re-elected in 1812 but died December 30, 1812.
Isaac Griffin Democratic-Republican May 13, 1813 –
March 3, 1817
13th
14th
Elected to finish John Smilie's term.
Re-elected in 1814.
Retired.
Christian Tarr Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1821
15th
16th
Elected in 1816.
Re-elected in 1818.
Lost re-election.
Andrew Stewart Democratic-Republican March 4, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
17th Elected in 1820.
Redistricted to the 14th district.
 
John Tod
Jacksonian Democratic-Republican March 4, 1823 –
????, 1824
18th Redistricted from the 8th district and re-elected in 1822.
Resigned to become judge of Court of Common Pleas of 16th judicial district.
Vacant ?????, 1824 –
December 6, 1824
Alexander Thomson Jacksonian Democratic-Republican December 6, 1824 –
March 3, 1825
18th
19th
Elected October 12, 1824 to finish Tod's term.
Elected the same day in 1824 to the next term.
Resigned.
Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
May 1, 1826
Vacant May 1, 1826 –
December 4, 1826
Chauncey Forward Jacksonian December 4, 1826 –
March 3, 1831
19th
20th
21st
Elected October 10, 1826 to finish Thomson's term and seated December 4, 1826.
Elected the same day in 1826 to the next term.
Re-elected in 1828.
Retired.
George Burd Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1833
22nd Elected in 1830.
Redistricted to the 18th district.
Jesse Miller Jacksonian March 4, 1833 –
October 30, 1836
23rd
24th
Elected in 1832.
Resigned to become the First Auditor of the United States Department of the Treasury.
Vacant October 30, 1836 –
December 5, 1836
James Black Jacksonian December 5, 1836 –
March 3, 1837
24th Elected to finish Miller's term.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Charles McClure Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
25th [Data unknown/missing.]
William Sterrett Ramsey Democratic March 4, 1839 –
October 17, 1840
26th [Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant October 17, 1840 –
December 7, 1840
Charles McClure Democratic December 7, 1840 –
March 3, 1841
26th Elected to finish Ramsey's term.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Amos Gustine Democratic May 4, 1841 –
March 3, 1843
27th [Data unknown/missing.]
Henry Frick Whig March 4, 1843 –
March 1, 1844
28th [Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant March 1, 1844 –
April 5, 1844
 
James Pollock
Whig April 5, 1844 –
March 3, 1849
28th
29th
30th
Elected to finish Frick's term.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Joseph Casey Whig March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1851
31st [Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
James Gamble Democratic March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
32nd [Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 15th district.
 
Asa Packer
Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1857
33rd
34th
[Data unknown/missing.]
William H. Dimmick Democratic March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1861
35th
36th
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Philip Johnson
Democratic March 4, 1861 –
March 3, 1863
37th [Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 11th district.
 
Henry W. Tracy
Independent Republican March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1865
38th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Ulysses Mercur
Republican March 4, 1865 –
December 2, 1872
39th
40th
41st
42nd
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned to become associate justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania
Vacant December 2, 1872 –
December 24, 1872
 
Frank C. Bunnell
Republican December 24, 1872 –
March 3, 1873
42nd Elected to finish Mercur's term.
[Data unknown/missing.]
James D. Strawbridge Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
43rd [Data unknown/missing.]
 
James B. Reilly
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879
44th
45th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
John W. Ryon Democratic March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1881
46th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Charles N. Brumm
Greenback March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1885
47th
48th
49th
50th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Republican March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1889
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
James B. Reilly
Democratic March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1895
51st
52nd
53rd
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Charles N. Brumm
Republican March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1899
54th
55th
[Data unknown/missing.]
James W. Ryan Democratic March 4, 1899 –
March 3, 1901
56th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
George R. Patterson
Republican March 4, 1901 –
March 3, 1903
57th [Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 12th district.
Marcus C.L. Kline Democratic March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1907
58th
59th
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
John H. Rothermel
Democratic March 4, 1907 –
March 3, 1915
60th
61st
62nd
63rd
[Data unknown/missing.]
Arthur G. Dewalt Democratic March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1921
64th
65th
66th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Fred B. Gernerd Republican March 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1923
67th [Data unknown/missing.]
George F. Brumm Republican March 4, 1923 –
March 3, 1927
68th
69th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Cyrus M. Palmer Republican March 4, 1927 –
March 3, 1929
70th [Data unknown/missing.]
George F. Brumm Republican March 4, 1929 –
May 29, 1934
71st
72nd
73rd
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant May 29, 1934 –
January 3, 1935
 
James H. Gildea
Democratic January 3, 1935 –
January 3, 1939
74th
75th
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Ivor D. Fenton
Republican January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1945
76th
77th
78th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 12th district.
Daniel K. Hoch Democratic January 3, 1945 –
January 3, 1947
79th Redistricted from the 14th district.
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Frederick Augustus Muhlenberg
Republican January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1949
80th [Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
 
George M. Rhodes
Democratic January 3, 1949 –
January 3, 1953
81st
82nd
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 14th district.
 
Samuel K. McConnell Jr.
Republican January 3, 1953 –
September 1, 1957
83rd
84th
85th
Redistricted from the 16th district.
Resigned.
Vacant September 1, 1957 –
November 5, 1957
John A. Lafore Jr. Republican November 5, 1957 –
January 3, 1961
85th
86th
Elected to finish McConnell's term.
Lost renomination.
 
Richard S. Schweiker
Republican January 3, 1961 –
January 3, 1969
87th
88th
89th
90th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
 
R. Lawrence Coughlin
Republican January 3, 1969 –
January 3, 1993
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
 
Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky
Democratic January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 1995
103rd [Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
 
Jon D. Fox
Republican January 3, 1995 –
January 3, 1999
104th
105th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
 
Joe Hoeffel
Democratic January 3, 1999 –
January 3, 2005
106th
107th
108th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
 
Allyson Schwartz
Democratic January 3, 2005 –
January 3, 2015
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired to run for Governor of Pennsylvania
 
Brendan Boyle
Democratic January 3, 2015 –
January 3, 2019
114th
115th
Re-districted to 2nd district.
 
John Joyce
Republican January 3, 2019 –
present
116th Incumbent

Recent election resultsEdit

Year Election Winner Party Votes % Nominated opponent Party Votes %
2000 General Joseph M. Hoeffel Democratic 146,026 53% Stewart Greenleaf Republican 126,501 46%
2002 General Joseph M. Hoeffel Democratic 107,945 51% Melissa Brown Republican 100,295 47%
2004 General Allyson Schwartz Democratic 171,763 56% Melissa Brown Republican 127,205 41%
2006 General Allyson Schwartz Democratic 147,368 66% Raj Bhakta Republican 75,492 34%
2008 General Allyson Schwartz Democratic 196,868 63% Marina Kats Republican 108,271 35%
2010 General Allyson Schwartz Democratic 117,798 56% Dee Adcock Republican 91,195 44%
2012 General Allyson Schwartz Democratic 209,901 69% Joe Rooney Republican 93,918 31%
2014 General Brendan Boyle Democratic 123,601 67% Dee Adcock Republican 60,549 33%
2016 General Brendan Boyle Democratic 239,316 100% None
2018 General John Joyce Republican 178,533 70% Brent Ottaway Democratic 74,733 29%

Historical district boundariesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "New Pennsylvania Map Is a Major Boost for Democrats". The Cook Political Report. February 20, 2017. Retrieved February 21, 2017.
  2. ^ Cohn, Nate; Bloch, Matthew; Quealy, Kevin (February 19, 2018). "The New Pennsylvania House Districts Are In. We Review the Mapmakers' Choices". The Upshot. The New York Times. Retrieved February 20, 2018.
  3. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.

External linksEdit