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Pennsylvania's 8th congressional district

Pennsylvania's 8th congressional district is located in the northeastern region of the state. It encompasses all of Wayne County, Pike County, and Lackawanna County, along with portions of Luzerne County and Monroe County.

Pennsylvania's 8th congressional district
Pennsylvania Congressional District 8.png
Boundaries since January 2019; below statistics, except PVI, apply to old boundaries
Representative
  Matt Cartwright
DMoosic
Distribution
  • 90.73% urban
  • 9.27% rural
Population (2000)646,403
Median income59,207
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+1[1]

The district was primarily based in Bucks County from the 1940s until 2018, even as most other districts in Pennsylvania changed drastically during that time frame due to population shifts and Pennsylvania's loss of seats in the House. [2]

The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania redrew the district in February 2018 after ruling the previous map unconstitutional due to gerrymandering. The 8th district was reassigned to the northeastern part of the state for the 2018 elections and representation thereafter. Parts of the new 8th come from the old 17th district, including the ancestrally Democratic cities of Scranton and Wilkes-Barre in the Wyoming Valley, and other parts come from the old 10th district, including the more conservative counties of Pike and Wayne.[3] The district is rated slightly Republican with a Cook PVI of R+1; however, the Democratic incumbent of the old 17th district, Matthew Cartwright, won in 2018.[4]

Contents

District characteristicsEdit

The district is a mix of suburban and rural communities. It is predominantly white and middle class. The bulk of its population is located in the ancestrally Democratic cities of Scranton and Wilkes-Barre. However, the Democrats in this district are not as liberal as their counterparts in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. The old 17th swung from a 55-43 win for Barack Obama to a 54-43 win for Donald Trump--the first time much of this area had voted for a Republican since 1988.

Election resultsEdit

US House election, 2004: Pennsylvania District 8
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Mike Fitzpatrick 183,229 55 -9
Democratic Virginia Schrader 143,427 44 +7
Libertarian Arthur L. Farnsworth 3,710 1 +1
Constitution Erich Lukas 898 0.3 +0.3
Turnout 331,264
US House election, 2006: Pennsylvania District 8
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Patrick Murphy 125,667 50 +6
Republican Mike Fitzpatrick 124,146 50 -5
Turnout 249,813
US House election, 2008: Pennsylvania District 8
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Patrick Murphy 197,869 57 +7
Republican Tom Manion 145,103 42 -8
Independent Tom Lingenfelter 5,543 2
Turnout 348,515
US House election, 2010: Pennsylvania District 8
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Mike Fitzpatrick 126,404 54 +12
Democratic Patrick Murphy 109,157 46 -11
Turnout 235,561
US House election, 2012: Pennsylvania District 8[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Mike Fitzpatrick 199,379 56.6 +2.6
Democratic Kathy Boockvar 152,859 43.4 -2.6
Turnout 352,238
US House election, 2014: Pennsylvania's 8th Congressional District[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Mike Fitzpatrick (Incumbent) 137,731 61.90
Democratic Kevin Strouse 84,767 38.10
Turnout 222,498

List of members representing the districtEdit

The district was created in 1791.

1791–1793: One seatEdit

Representative Party Years Electoral history
 
William Findley
Anti-Administration March 4, 1791 –
March 3, 1793
Elected in 1791.
Redistricted to the at-large district.

District eliminated in 1793 and replaced by the at-large district.

1795–1813: One seatEdit

District restored in 1795.

Representative Party Years Electoral history
 
Thomas Hartley
Federalist March 4, 1795 –
December 21, 1800
Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1794.
Re-elected in 1796.
Re-elected in 1798.
Retired and then died.
Vacant December 21, 1800 –
January 15, 1801
John Stewart Democratic-Republican January 15, 1801 –
March 3, 1803
Elected in 1800.
Elected January 15, 1801 to finish Hartley's term and seated February 3, 1801.
Redistricted to the 6th district.
 
William Findley
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1813
Elected in 1802.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Redistricted to the 11th district.
William Piper Democratic-Republican March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1817
Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
Retired.
Alexander Ogle Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1819
Elected in 1816.
Retired.
Robert Philson Democratic-Republican March 4, 1819 –
March 3, 1821
Elected in 1818.
Lost re-election as a Federalist.
 
John Tod
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
Elected in 1820.
Redistricted to the 13th district.

1823–1833: Two seatsEdit

Years Cong
ress
Seat A Seat B
Representative Party Electoral history Representative Party Electoral history
March 4, 1823 –
April 20, 1824
18th Thomas Jones Rogers Jackson Democratic-Republican Redistricted from the 6th district and re-elected in 1822.
Resigned.
 
Samuel D. Ingham
Jackson Democratic-Republican Redistricted from the 6th district and re-elected in 1822.
Re-elected in 1824.
Re-elected in 1826.
Re-elected in 1828 but resigned to become U.S. Secretary of the Treasury.
April 20, 1824 –
December 9, 1824
Vacant
December 9, 1824 –
March 3, 1825
 
George Wolf
Jackson Democratic-Republican Elected October 12, 1824 to finish Rogers's term and seated December 9, 1824.
Also elected the same day in 1824 to the next term.
Re-elected in 1826.
Re-elected in 1828 but resigned to become Governor of Pennsylvania.
March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1829
19th
20th
Jacksonian Jacksonian
March 4, 1829 –
October 13, 1829
21st Vacant   Vacant  
October 13, 1829 –
March 3, 1833
21st
22nd
Samuel A. Smith Jacksonian Elected October 13, 1829 to finish Wolf's term and seated December 7, 1829.
Re-elected in 1830.
Retired.
Peter Ihrie Jr. Jacksonian Elected October 13, 1829 to finish Ingham's term and seated December 7, 1829.
Re-elected in 1830.
Redistricted to the 7th district and lost re-election.

1833–present: One seatEdit

Member Party Years Electoral history District location
Henry King Jacksonian March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1835
Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 1832.
Retired.
1833–1843
[Data unknown/missing.]
Edward Burd Hubley Jacksonian March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
Elected in 1834.
Re-elected in 1836.
Retired.
Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
Peter Newhard Democratic March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1843
Elected in 1838.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
Jeremiah Brown Whig March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
Redistricted from the 4th district.
Retired.
1843–1853
[Data unknown/missing.]
John Strohm Whig March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1849
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Thaddeus Stevens
Whig March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1853
[Data unknown/missing.]
Henry A. Muhlenberg Democratic March 4, 1853 –
January 9, 1854
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
1853–1863
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vacant January 9, 1854 –
February 4, 1854
 
J. Glancy Jones
Democratic February 4, 1854 –
October 30, 1858
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned to become United States Minister to Austria.
Vacant October 30, 1858 –
December 7, 1858
 
William H. Keim
Republican December 7, 1858 –
March 3, 1859
[Data unknown/missing.]
John Schwartz Anti-Lecompton Democratic March 4, 1859 –
June 20, 1860
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant June 20, 1860 –
December 3, 1860
Jacob K. McKenty Democratic December 3, 1860 –
March 3, 1861
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
 
Sydenham E. Ancona
Democratic March 4, 1861 –
March 3, 1867
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost renomination.
1863–1873
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
James L. Getz
Democratic March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1873
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
 
Hiester Clymer
Democratic March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1881
[Data unknown/missing.] 1873–1883
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Daniel Ermentrout
Democratic March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1889
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost renomination.
1883–1893
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
William Mutchler
Democratic March 4, 1889 –
June 23, 1893
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
1893–1903
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vacant June 23, 1893 –
August 7, 1893
 
Howard Mutchler
Democratic August 7, 1893 –
March 3, 1895
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
 
Joseph J. Hart
Democratic March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1897
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
 
William S. Kirkpatrick
Republican March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1899
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
 
Laird H. Barber
Democratic March 4, 1899 –
March 3, 1901
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
 
Howard Mutchler
Democratic March 4, 1901 –
March 3, 1903
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
 
Irving P. Wanger
Republican March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1911
Redistricted from the 7th district.
Lost re-election.
1903–1913
[Data unknown/missing.]
Robert E. Difenderfer Democratic March 4, 1911 –
March 3, 1915
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost renomination.
1913–1933
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Henry W. Watson
Republican March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1923
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the Pennsylvania's 9th congressional district.
 
Thomas S. Butler
Republican March 4, 1923 –
May 26, 1928
Redistricted from the 7th district.
Died.
Vacant May 26, 1928 –
November 6, 1928
 
James Wolfenden
Republican November 6, 1928 –
January 3, 1945
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the Pennsylvania's 7th congressional district.
1933–1943
[Data unknown/missing.]
1943–1953
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Charles L. Gerlach
Republican January 3, 1945 –
May 5, 1947
Redistricted from the 9th district.
Died.
Vacant May 5, 1947 –
September 9, 1947
 
Franklin H. Lichtenwalter
Republican September 9, 1947 –
January 3, 1951
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Albert C. Vaughn
Republican January 3, 1951 –
September 1, 1951
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant September 1, 1951 –
November 6, 1951
 
Karl C. King
Republican November 6, 1951 –
January 3, 1957
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
1953–1963
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Willard S. Curtin
Republican January 3, 1957 –
January 3, 1967
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
1963–1973
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Edward G. Biester Jr.
Republican January 3, 1967 –
January 3, 1977
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
1973–1983
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Peter H. Kostmayer
Democratic January 3, 1977 –
January 3, 1981
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
 
James K. Coyne, III
Republican January 3, 1981 –
January 3, 1983
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
 
Peter H. Kostmayer
Democratic January 3, 1983 –
January 3, 1993
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
1983–1993
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
James C. Greenwood
Republican January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 2005
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
1993–2003
[Data unknown/missing.]
2003–2013
 
 
Mike Fitzpatrick
Republican January 3, 2005 –
January 3, 2007
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
 
Patrick Murphy
Democratic January 3, 2007 –
January 3, 2011
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
 
Mike Fitzpatrick
Republican January 3, 2011 –
January 3, 2017
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
2013–2019
 
 
Brian Fitzpatrick
Republican January 3, 2017 –
January 3, 2019.
Elected in 2016.
Redistricted to the 1st district.
 
Matt Cartwright
Democratic January 3, 2019 –
present
Redistricted from the 17th district.
[Data unknown/missing.]
2019–Present
 

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "New Pennsylvania Map Is a Major Boost for Democrats". The Cook Political Report. February 20, 2017. Retrieved February 21, 2017.
  2. ^ "Congressional Interactive District Map". Retrieved 30 August 2016.
  3. ^ Cohn, Nate; Bloch, Matthew; Quealy, Kevin (February 19, 2018). "The New Pennsylvania House Districts Are In. We Review the Mapmakers' Choices". The Upshot. The New York Times. Retrieved February 20, 2018.
  4. ^ "Battle for the House 2018". Real Clear Politics. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  5. ^ "2012 General Election—Official Returns". Pennsylvania Department of State. 2012-11-06. Archived from the original on 2012-11-16. Retrieved 2013-01-01.
  6. ^ "Pennsylvania 2014 General Election - November 4, 2014 Official Results". Pennsylvania Secretary of State. November 4, 2014. Archived from the original on February 15, 2015. Retrieved January 16, 2015.

External linksEdit