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Pennsylvania's 4th congressional district

Pennsylvania's fourth congressional district, effective January 3, 2019, encompasses the majority of Montgomery County and a small sliver of Berks County in southeastern Pennsylvania, and is represented by Democrat Madeleine Dean. From 2013 to 2018, the district was in the south-central part of the state, covering all of Adams and York counties, as well as parts of Cumberland and Dauphin counties, with representation by Republican Scott Perry.

Pennsylvania's 4th congressional district
Pennsylvania Congressional District 4.png
Boundaries since January 3, 2019
Representative
  Madeleine Dean
DAbington Township
Cook PVID+7[1]

Contents

HistoryEdit

From 2003 to 2013 the district included suburbs of Pittsburgh as well as Beaver County, Lawrence County, and Mercer County. The district had a slight Democratic registration edge, although it had voted for Republicans in several federal elections over the 2000s decade, including for President George W. Bush in 2000 and 2004, as well as Lynn Swann for governor in 2006. The heart of the district was a string of mostly white and middle class suburbs. Plum and Murrysville, two large and mainly residential boroughs, are the main towns in the suburban portion of the district that lies to the east of the city. Also included were the many suburban areas that make up northern Allegheny County and southern Butler County, Pennsylvania, including the larger communities of McCandless and Franklin Park, as well as several exclusive suburbs that have long been home to Pittsburgh's old money elite, including Fox Chapel and Sewickley. The northern suburbs had a generally moderate voting populace, which trends Democratic but makes up the swing vote, especially in races for national office. Further north, the district took on a different character. The suburban areas of Beaver County are somewhat less affluent and were heavily labor Democratic. The areas of Lawrence County and Mercer County had a more rural feel, but also had a union Democrat center within the city of New Castle.

This district changed drastically when Pennsylvania's new districts went into effect on January 3, 2013. Due to slower population growth than the nation as a whole, Pennsylvania lost a seat in Congress in reapportionment following the 2010 United States Census, and this seat was effectively eliminated. Most of the 4th district was merged into a redrawn 12th district, and the previous 19th district was rebranded as the 4th. Thus from 2013 to 2018, the 4th district was located in south-central Pennsylvania and included all of Adams and York counties, as well as parts of Cumberland and Dauphin counties. During this time, the district was represented by Republican Scott Perry.

The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania redrew the state's congressional districts in February 2018 after ruling the previous map unconstitutional due to gerrymandering. The fourth district was reconfigured as a Democratic-leaning area to the northwest of Philadelphia for the 2018 election and representation thereafter. Geographically, it is the successor to the old 13th district, which was represented at the time by Democrat Brendan Boyle. Boyle, however, opted to run in the neighboring 2nd district, the geographic successor to the 1st district, represented by retiring incumbent Bob Brady. The bulk of Perry's representation, including York and Harrisburg, became part of a redrawn tenth district. Gettysburg and Adams County joined a new, heavily Republican 13th District, which was the successor to the old ninth district of retiring Congressman Bill Shuster. Areas to the south and east of York joined Lancaster in a redrawn, heavily Republican eleventh district, the successor of Republican Lloyd Smucker's 16th district.[2]

List of members representing the districtEdit

The district was organized from the Pennsylvania's at-large congressional district in 1791

1791–1793: One seatEdit

Representative Party Years Electoral history
Daniel Hiester Anti-Administration March 4, 1791 –
March 3, 1793
Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1791.
Redistricted to the at-large district.

1795–1843: Two, then one, then three seatsEdit

District created in 1795 with two seats from the Pennsylvania's at-large congressional district. The second seat was eliminated in 1813. The second seat was restored in 1823 along with a third seat.

Cong
ress
Years Seat A Seat B Seat C
Representative Party Electoral history Representative Party Electoral history Representative Party Electoral history
4th March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1797
 
Samuel Sitgreaves
Federalist Elected in 1794.
Re-elected in 1796.
Resigned.
John Richards Democratic-Republican Elected in 1794.
Lost re-election.
No third seat until 1823
5th March 4, 1797 –
August 29, 1798
John Chapman Federalist Elected in 1796.
Lost re-election.
August 29, 1798 –
December 4, 1798
Vacant
December 4, 1798 –
March 3, 1799
Robert Brown Democratic-Republican Elected October 9, 1798 to finish Sitgreaves's term and seated December 4, 1798.
Also elected October 9, 1798 to the next term.
Re-elected in 1800.
Redistricted to the 2nd district.
6th March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1801
 
Peter Muhlenberg
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1798.
Elected in 1800 but declined the seat when elected U.S. Senator.
7th March 4, 1801 –
December 7, 1801
Vacant
December 7, 1801 –
March 3, 1803
Isaac Van Horne Democratic-Republican Elected October 13, 1801 to finish Muhlenberg's term and seated December 7, 1801.
Redistricted to the 2nd district.
8th March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1805
John A. Hanna Democratic-Republican Redistricted from the 6th district and re-elected in 1802.
Died.
David Bard Democratic-Republican Elected in 1802.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Redistricted to the 9th district.
9th March 4, 1805 –
July 23, 1805
July 23, 1805 –
December 2, 1805
Vacant
December 2, 1805 –
March 3, 1807
Robert Whitehill Democratic-Republican Elected October 8, 1805 to finish Hanna's term and seated December 2, 1805.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Redistricted to the 5th district.
10th March 4, 1807
March 3, 1809
11th March 4, 1809
March 3, 1811
12th March 4, 1811
March 3, 1813
13th March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1815
Hugh Glasgow Democratic-Republican Elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
Retired.
No second seat from 1813 to 1823
14th March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1817
15th March 4, 1817 –
April 20, 1818
Jacob Spangler Democratic-Republican Elected in 1816.
Resigned to become Surveyor-General of Pennsylvania.
April 20, 1818 –
November 16, 1818
Vacant
November 16, 1818 –
March 3, 1819
Jacob Hostetter Democratic-Republican Elected in 1818 to finish Spangler's term and seated November 16, 1818.
Also elected in 1818 to the next term.
Lost re-election.
16th March 4, 1819 –
March 3, 1821
17th March 4, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
James S. Mitchell Democratic-Republican Elected in 1820.
Redistricted to the 10th district.
18th March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
 
James Buchanan
Jackson Federalist Redistricted from the 3rd district and re-elected in 1822.
Re-elected in 1824.
Re-elected in 1826.
Re-elected in 1828.
Retired.
 
Samuel Edwards
Jackson Federalist Redistricted from the 1st district and re-elected in 1822.
Re-elected in 1824.
Retired.
Isaac Wayne Jackson Federalist [Data unknown/missing.]
19th March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
Jacksonian Jacksonian Charles Miner Anti-Jacksonian Elected in 1824.
Re-elected in 1826.
Retired.
20th March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1829
Samuel Anderson Anti-Jacksonian Elected in 1826.
Returned to Pennsylvania House of Representatives.
21st March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1831
 
George G. Leiper
Jacksonian Elected in 1828.
Retired.
Joshua Evans Jr. Jacksonian Elected in 1828.
Re-elected in 1830.
Retired.
22nd March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1833
William Hiester Anti-Masonic Elected in 1830.
Re-elected in 1832.
Re-elected in 1834.
Retired.
David Potts Jr. Anti-Masonic Elected in 1830.
Re-elected in 1832.
Re-elected in 1834.
Re-elected in 1836.
Retired.
23rd March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1835
Edward Darlington Anti-Masonic Elected in 1832.
Re-elected in 1834.
Re-elected in 1836.
Retired.
24th March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
25th March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
Edward Davies Anti-Masonic Elected in 1836.
Re-elected in 1838.
[Data unknown/missing.]
26th March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1841
Francis James Anti-Masonic Elected in 1838.
Re-elected in 1840.
[Data unknown/missing.]
John Edwards Anti-Masonic Elected in 1838.
Re-elected in 1840.
[Data unknown/missing.]
27th March 4, 1841 –
March 3, 1843
Jeremiah Brown Whig Elected in 1840.
Redistricted to the 8th district.
Whig Whig

1843–present: One seatEdit

Member Party Years Electoral history
 
Charles J. Ingersoll
Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1849
Redistricted from the 3rd district and re-elected in 1843.
Re-elected in 1844.
Re-elected in 1846.
Retired.
 
John Robbins
Democratic March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1853
Elected in 1848.
Re-elected in 1850.
Redistricted to the 3rd district.
William H. Witte Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
Elected in 1852.
Retired.
 
Jacob Broom
American March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
Elected in 1854.
Lost renomination.
 
Henry M. Phillips
Democratic March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
Elected in 1856.
Lost re-election.
William Millward Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
Elected in 1858.
Lost renomination.
 
William D. Kelley
Republican March 4, 1861 –
January 9, 1890
Elected in 1860.
Re-elected in 1862.
Re-elected in 1864.
Re-elected in 1866.
Re-elected in 1868.
Re-elected in 1870.
Re-elected in 1872.
Re-elected in 1874.
Re-elected in 1876.
Re-elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
re-elected in 1882.
Re-elected in 1884.
re-elected in 1886.
re-elected in 1888.
Died.
Vacant January 9, 1890 –
February 18, 1890
 
John E. Reyburn
Republican February 18, 1890 –
March 3, 1897
Elected in 1890. to finish Kelley's term.
Re-elected in 1890.
Re-elected in 1892.
Re-elected in 1894.
Lost renomination.
 
James R. Young
Republican March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1903
Elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Robert H. Foerderer
Republican March 4, 1903 –
July 26, 1903
Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1902.
Died.
Vacant July 26, 1903 –
November 3, 1903
Reuben O. Moon Republican November 3, 1903 –
March 3, 1913
Elected to complete Foerderer's term.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Lost renomination.
George W. Edmonds Republican March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1925
Elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Lost renomination.
Benjamin M. Golder Republican March 4, 1925 –
March 3, 1933
Elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Lost re-election.
George W. Edmonds Republican March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1935
Elected in 1932.
Lost re-election.
J. Burrwood Daly Democratic January 3, 1935 –
March 12, 1939
Elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Died.
Vacant March 12, 1939 –
November 7, 1939
John E. Sheridan Democratic November 7, 1939 –
January 3, 1947
Elected to complete Daly's term.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Elected in 1944.
Retired.
Franklin J. Maloney Republican January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1949
Elected in 1946.
Lost re-election.
Earl Chudoff Democratic January 3, 1949 –
January 5, 1958
Elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-lected in 1956.
Resigned to become judge of the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas.
Vacant January 5, 1958 –
May 20, 1958
 
Robert N. C. Nix Sr.
Democratic May 20, 1958 –
January 3, 1963
Elected to complete Chudoff's term.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Redistricted to the 2nd district.
 
Herman Toll
Democratic January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1967
Redistricted from the 6th district and re-elected in 1962.
Elected in 1964.
Retired.
 
Joshua Eilberg
Democratic January 3, 1967 –
January 3, 1979
Elected in 1966.
Elected in 1968.
Elected in 1970.
Elected in 1972.
Elected in 1974.
Elected in 1976.
Lost renomination.
 
Charles F. Dougherty
Republican January 3, 1979 –
January 3, 1983
Elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Redistricted to the 3rd district and lost re-election.
 
Joseph P. Kolter
Democratic January 3, 1983 –
January 3, 1993
Elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Lost renomination.
 
Ron Klink
Democratic January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 2001
Elected in 1992.
Elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Elected in 1998.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
 
Melissa Hart
Republican January 3, 2001 –
January 3, 2007
Elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Lost re-election.
 
Jason Altmire
Democratic January 3, 2007 –
January 3, 2013
Elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Redistricted to the 12th district and lost renomination there.
 
Scott Perry
Republican January 3, 2013 –
January 3, 2019
Elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Redistricted to the 10th district.
 
Madeleine Dean
Democratic January 3, 2019 –
present
Elected in 2018.

Recent electionsEdit

2006 election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jason Altmire 130,480 51.92%
Republican Melissa Hart (Incumbent) 120,822 48.08%
Majority 9,658 3.84%
Turnout 251,302 100%
2008 election[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jason Altmire (Incumbent) 186,536 55.86%
Republican Melissa Hart 147,411 44.14%
2010 election[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jason Altmire (Incumbent) 120,827 50.81%
Republican Keith Rothfus 116,958 49.19%
2012 election[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott Perry 181,603 59.74%
Democratic Harry Perkinson 104,643 34.42%
Independent Wayne W. Wolff 11,524 3.79%
Libertarian Michael B. Koffenberger 6,210 2.04%
2014 election[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott Perry (Incumbent) 147,090 74.54%
Democratic Linda D. Thompson 50,250 25.46%
2016 election[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott Perry (Incumbent) 220,628 66.06%
Democratic Joshua T. Burkholder 113,372 33.94%
2018 election[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Madeleine Dean 210,219 63.45%
Republican Daniel David 121,117 36.66%

Historical district boundariesEdit

In the very early 19th Century this district included all or part of Bucks County.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "New Pennsylvania Map Is a Major Boost for Democrats". The Cook Political Report. February 20, 2017. Retrieved February 21, 2017.
  2. ^ Cohn, Nate; Bloch, Matthew; Quealy, Kevin (February 19, 2018). "The New Pennsylvania House Districts Are In. We Review the Mapmakers' Choices". The Upshot. The New York Times. Retrieved February 20, 2018.
  3. ^ "CNN Elections Results 2006". Retrieved 9 November 2006.
  4. ^ "2008 General Election: Representative in Congress". Pennsylvania Department of State. November 4, 2008. Retrieved July 24, 2018.
  5. ^ "2010 General Election: Representative in Congress". Pennsylvania Department of State. November 2, 2010. Retrieved July 24, 2018.
  6. ^ "2012 General Election: Representative in Congress". Pennsylvania Department of State. November 6, 2012. Retrieved July 24, 2018.
  7. ^ "2014 General Election: Representative in Congress". Pennsylvania Department of State. November 4, 2014. Retrieved July 24, 2018.
  8. ^ "2016 General Election: Representative in Congress". Pennsylvania Department of State. November 8, 2016. Retrieved July 24, 2018.
  9. ^ "2018 General Election: Representative in Congress". Pennsylvania Department of State. November 6, 2016. Retrieved November 12, 2018.

External linksEdit