York County, Pennsylvania

York County (Pennsylvania Dutch: Yarrick Kaundi) is a county in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2020 census, the population was 456,438.[1] Its county seat is York.[2] The county was created on August 19, 1749, from part of Lancaster County and named either after the Duke of York, an early patron of the Penn family, or for the city and county of York in England.

York County
York County Administrative Center
York County Administrative Center
Official seal of York County
Map of Pennsylvania highlighting York County
Location within the U.S. state of Pennsylvania
Map of the United States highlighting Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 39°55′N 76°44′W / 39.92°N 76.73°W / 39.92; -76.73
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
FoundedAugust 19, 1749
Named forDuke of York
SeatYork
Largest cityYork
Area
 • Total911 sq mi (2,360 km2)
 • Land904 sq mi (2,340 km2)
 • Water6.5 sq mi (17 km2)  0.7%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total456,438
 • Density481.1/sq mi (185.8/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional districts10th, 11th
Websiteyorkcountypa.gov

York County comprises the York-Hanover, Pennsylvania Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Harrisburg-York-Lebanon, Pennsylvania Combined Statistical Area. It is in the Susquehanna Valley, a large fertile agricultural region in South Central Pennsylvania.

Based on the Articles of Confederation having been adopted in York by the Second Continental Congress on November 15, 1777, the local government and business community began referring to York in the 1960s as the first capital of the United States of America. The designation has been debated by historians ever since.[3] Congress considered York, and the borough of Wrightsville, on the eastern side of York County along the Susquehanna River, as a permanent capital of the United States before Washington, D.C., was selected.[4]

GeographyEdit

 
An Oakland Run waterfall near the Mason-Dixon Trail in SE York County

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 911 square miles (2,360 km2), of which 904 square miles (2,340 km2) is land and 6.5 square miles (17 km2) (0.7%) is water.[5] The county is bound to its eastern border by the Susquehanna River. Its southern border is the Mason–Dixon line, which separates Pennsylvania and Maryland. Within the U.S. piedmont region, York County is generally hilly and rises to the Blue Ridge Mountains in the northwest, where it is bordered by Yellow Breeches Creek. Interior waterways include Codorus and Conewago Creeks, and Lakes Lehman,[6] Kiwanis, Marburg, Pahagaco, Pinchot, Redman, and Williams.[7]

Adjacent countiesEdit

Major roads and highwaysEdit

ClimateEdit

Most of York County has a hot-summer humid continental climate (Dfa) and the hardiness zones are 6b and 7a. The latest temperature averages show some low-lying eastern areas of the county to have a humid subtropical climate (Cfa.)

Climate data for York Airport, Pennsylvania (1981–2010 normals, extremes 1997–present)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 72
(22)
75
(24)
86
(30)
91
(33)
93
(34)
96
(36)
100
(38)
99
(37)
95
(35)
90
(32)
84
(29)
78
(26)
100
(38)
Average high °F (°C) 38.6
(3.7)
41.7
(5.4)
51.5
(10.8)
63.0
(17.2)
72.5
(22.5)
81.1
(27.3)
84.8
(29.3)
83.5
(28.6)
75.9
(24.4)
65.7
(18.7)
54.4
(12.4)
42.3
(5.7)
63.0
(17.2)
Average low °F (°C) 20.6
(−6.3)
22.3
(−5.4)
29.3
(−1.5)
39.0
(3.9)
48.9
(9.4)
58.7
(14.8)
62.8
(17.1)
60.7
(15.9)
52.8
(11.6)
41.4
(5.2)
33.9
(1.1)
24.6
(−4.1)
41.3
(5.2)
Record low °F (°C) −12
(−24)
−12
(−24)
−12
(−24)
17
(−8)
28
(−2)
39
(4)
44
(7)
42
(6)
32
(0)
22
(−6)
12
(−11)
−10
(−23)
−12
(−24)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 2.93
(74)
2.73
(69)
3.51
(89)
3.44
(87)
3.98
(101)
3.34
(85)
3.69
(94)
3.57
(91)
4.26
(108)
3.26
(83)
3.46
(88)
2.97
(75)
41.14
(1,045)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 8.9
(23)
8.1
(21)
3.5
(8.9)
0.5
(1.3)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.8
(2.0)
3.2
(8.1)
25.0
(64)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 10.0 9.8 11.1 12.1 12.8 11.7 10.9 10.0 9.5 8.4 10.3 10.0 126.6
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 3.8 2.7 1.5 0.3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.5 1.7 10.5
Source: NOAA (snow, precipitation days, and snow days from York 3 SSW Pump Station COOP)[8][9][10]
Climate data for Harrisburg, Pennsylvania (Harrisburg Capital City Airport) 1991–2020 normals (Records 1939–2021)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 73
(23)
83
(28)
86
(30)
93
(34)
97
(36)
100
(38)
107
(42)
101
(38)
102
(39)
97
(36)
84
(29)
75
(24)
107
(42)
Average high °F (°C) 40.3
(4.6)
43.2
(6.2)
52.6
(11.4)
64.9
(18.3)
74.7
(23.7)
83.2
(28.4)
87.6
(30.9)
85.4
(29.7)
78.6
(25.9)
66.7
(19.3)
55.1
(12.8)
44.4
(6.9)
64.7
(18.2)
Daily mean °F (°C) 32.6
(0.3)
34.7
(1.5)
43.2
(6.2)
54.1
(12.3)
64.0
(17.8)
73.0
(22.8)
77.5
(25.3)
75.4
(24.1)
68.5
(20.3)
56.7
(13.7)
46.0
(7.8)
37.0
(2.8)
55.2
(12.9)
Average low °F (°C) 24.9
(−3.9)
26.2
(−3.2)
33.9
(1.1)
43.3
(6.3)
53.2
(11.8)
62.8
(17.1)
67.4
(19.7)
65.5
(18.6)
58.4
(14.7)
46.7
(8.2)
37.0
(2.8)
29.5
(−1.4)
45.7
(7.6)
Record low °F (°C) −9
(−23)
−5
(−21)
2
(−17)
19
(−7)
31
(−1)
40
(4)
49
(9)
45
(7)
30
(−1)
23
(−5)
13
(−11)
−8
(−22)
−9
(−23)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 2.64
(67)
2.36
(60)
3.35
(85)
3.70
(94)
3.48
(88)
3.72
(94)
4.30
(109)
3.68
(93)
4.12
(105)
3.68
(93)
2.80
(71)
3.15
(80)
40.98
(1,041)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 9 9 10 12 14 12 12 11 10 11 9 10 127
Source: NOAA[11]

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
179037,535
180025,643−31.7%
181031,95824.6%
182038,75921.3%
183042,85910.6%
184047,0109.7%
185057,45022.2%
186068,20018.7%
187076,13411.6%
188087,84115.4%
189099,48913.3%
1900116,41317.0%
1910136,40517.2%
1920144,5215.9%
1930167,13515.6%
1940178,0226.5%
1950202,73713.9%
1960238,33617.6%
1970272,60314.4%
1980312,96314.8%
1990339,5748.5%
2000381,75112.4%
2010434,97213.9%
2020456,4384.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]
1790–1960[13] 1900–1990[14]
1990–2000[15] 2010–2019[1]
 
A farm in York County, Pennsylvania

As of the census[16] of 2000, there were 381,751 people, 148,219 households, and 105,531 families residing in the county. The population density was 422 people per square mile (163/km2). There were 156,720 housing units at an average density of 173 per square mile (67/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 92.76% White, 3.69% African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.86% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.39% from other races, and 1.10% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.96% of the population. 42.0% were of German, 12.6% American, 7.7% Irish, 6.4% English and 5.1% Italian ancestry. 94.8% spoke English and 2.9% Spanish as their first language.

There were 148,219 households, out of which 32.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.30% were married couples living together, 9.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.80% were non-families. 23.30% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.60% under the age of 18, 7.50% from 18 to 24, 30.30% from 25 to 44, 24.00% from 45 to 64, and 13.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 96.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.80 males.

As of 2006, the York-Hanover Metropolitan Statistical Area was the fastest-growing metro area in the Northeast region, and was ranked among the fastest-growing in the nation, according to the "2006 Population Estimates for Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas" (U.S. Census Bureau). The estimates listed York-Hanover as the 95th fastest-growing metro area in the nation, increasing 9.1 percent between 2000 and 2006.

York city had a 77.3 percent increase in the number of residents of Hispanic or Latino origin, based on a comparison of the 2000 and 2010 U.S. census results.[17] The city's 30.9 percent Hispanic population (as of December 2017) is more than that of other places in the area.[18]

York County is home to Martin's Potato Chips in Thomasville, Utz Quality Foods, Inc. in Hanover, Snyder's of Hanover in Hanover, Hanover Foods in Hanover, Gibble's Potato Chips in York, Wolfgang Candy in York, The Bon-Ton in York, Dentsply in York, and a major manufacturing branch of Harley-Davidson Motor Company.

DialectEdit

The Central Pennsylvania accent and the Susquehanna dialect are the two most commonly heard speech patterns in the county, however there are numerous Mennonites and other persons of Pennsylvania Dutch descent that inhabit the county, who tend to speak with dialects similar to Pennsylvania Dutch English.[citation needed]

Metropolitan Statistical AreaEdit

The United States Office of Management and Budget has designated York County as the York–Hanover, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area.[19] The United States Census Bureau ranked the York–Hanover, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area as the 9th most populous in the state of Pennsylvania, and 115th most populous Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in the United States as of July 1, 2012.[20]

The Office of Management and Budget has further designated the York–Hanover MSA as a component of the more extensive Harrisburg–York–Lebanon, PA Combined Statistical Area,[19] the 43rd most populous Combined Statistical Area (CSA) and the 49th most populous primary statistical area of the United States as of July 1, 2012.[20][21] As of the 2017 estimates, the CSA's 1.26 million people ranks 5th in the state of Pennsylvania.[citation needed]

Politics and governmentEdit

Prior to 1952, York County was a Democratic stronghold in presidential elections, voting majority Republican only four times before then. Between the founding of the party in 1828 and 1900, the county voted Democratic every time, one of only a handful of counties in Pennsylvania to do so.[22] Starting with the 1952 election, it has become a Republican stronghold with Lyndon Johnson being the lone Democrat to win the county since. Since then, Jimmy Carter in 1976 and Barack Obama in 2008 are the only Democratic presidential candidates who have received over 40% of the county's vote, and George H. W. Bush in 1992 is the only Republican not to win a majority. The only real pockets of Democratic support are in the city of York, which has long sent Democrats to the state house.

United States presidential election results for York County, Pennsylvania[23]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 146,733 61.38% 88,114 36.86% 4,205 1.76%
2016 128,528 61.78% 68,524 32.94% 10,977 5.28%
2012 113,304 59.63% 73,191 38.52% 3,510 1.85%
2008 109,268 55.95% 82,839 42.42% 3,179 1.63%
2004 114,270 63.74% 63,701 35.53% 1,298 0.72%
2000 87,652 60.75% 51,958 36.01% 4,676 3.24%
1996 65,188 50.87% 49,596 38.70% 13,372 10.43%
1992 60,130 44.79% 46,113 34.35% 28,002 20.86%
1988 72,408 65.16% 37,691 33.92% 1,017 0.92%
1984 75,020 68.67% 33,359 30.54% 868 0.79%
1980 61,098 59.96% 33,406 32.79% 7,387 7.25%
1976 56,912 56.94% 41,281 41.30% 1,751 1.75%
1972 63,606 68.19% 27,520 29.50% 2,154 2.31%
1968 51,631 55.30% 33,328 35.69% 8,412 9.01%
1964 33,677 36.26% 58,787 63.30% 408 0.44%
1960 55,922 58.57% 39,164 41.02% 393 0.41%
1956 48,176 55.33% 38,743 44.50% 149 0.17%
1952 44,489 52.74% 39,508 46.84% 354 0.42%
1948 32,494 47.31% 33,321 48.52% 2,863 4.17%
1944 32,617 45.84% 38,226 53.72% 315 0.44%
1940 30,228 43.22% 39,543 56.54% 165 0.24%
1936 29,233 38.55% 45,142 59.53% 1,462 1.93%
1932 25,430 44.33% 29,313 51.10% 2,622 4.57%
1928 45,791 79.60% 11,216 19.50% 522 0.91%
1924 23,044 56.15% 15,600 38.01% 2,395 5.84%
1920 19,879 55.72% 14,396 40.35% 1,404 3.94%
1916 12,276 40.12% 16,314 53.32% 2,008 6.56%
1912 5,251 17.39% 14,979 49.61% 9,965 33.00%
1908 14,610 47.48% 15,171 49.30% 990 3.22%
1904 14,837 51.85% 12,996 45.42% 781 2.73%
1900 12,327 46.29% 13,732 51.56% 572 2.15%
1896 12,258 47.04% 13,054 50.09% 748 2.87%
1892 9,052 40.59% 12,822 57.50% 426 1.91%
1888 9,047 41.68% 12,359 56.94% 301 1.39%
1884 8,014 40.68% 11,552 58.65% 132 0.67%
1880 7,870 40.43% 11,581 59.49% 17 0.09%


As of November 1, 2021, there are 305,382 registered voters in York County.[24]

County commissionersEdit

  • Julie Wheeler, President, Republican
  • Ron Smith, Republican
  • Doug Hoke, Vice President, Democrat[25]

Other county officesEdit

  • Clerk of Courts, Dan Byrnes, Republican[26]
  • Controller, Greg Bower, Republican
  • Coroner, Pamela Gay, Republican[27]
  • District Attorney, David Sunday, Republican[28]
  • Prothonotary, Allison Blew, Republican[29]
  • Recorder of Deeds, Laura Shue, Republican[30]
  • Register of Wills, Bryan Tate, Republican[31]
  • Sheriff, Richard P. Keuerleber III, Republican[32]
  • Treasurer, Barbara Bair, Republican[33]

[34]

State House of RepresentativesEdit

District Representative[35] Party
47 Keith J. Gillespie Republican
92 Dawn Keefer Republican
93 Mike Jones Republican
94 Stanley E. Saylor Republican
95 Carol Hill-Evans Democratic
169 Kate Klunk Republican
193 Will Tallman Republican
196 Seth Grove Republican

State SenateEdit

District Senator Party
28 Kristin Phillips-Hill Republican
31 Mike Regan Republican
33 Doug Mastriano Republican
48 Chris Gebhard Republican

United States House of RepresentativesEdit

District Representative[34] Party
10 Scott Perry Republican
11 Lloyd Smucker Republican

United States SenateEdit

Senator Party
Bob Casey Democratic
Pat Toomey Republican

EducationEdit

 
Map of York County, Pennsylvania School Districts

Public school districtsEdit

Vocational schoolEdit

Public charter schoolsEdit

  • Crispus Attucks Youthbuild Charter School (K–6) – York
  • Helen Thackston Charter School (6–12) – York[36]
  • Lincoln Charter School (K–5) – York
  • New Hope Academy Charter School (K–6) – York
  • York Academy Regional Charter School
  • York Adams Academy (formerly York County High School)

Independent schoolsEdit

  • Christian School of York (PreK–12)
  • Keystone Christian Academy York (K–8)
  • Logos Academy York (K–12)
  • St. Joseph School Hanover (PreK–8)
  • St. Joseph School (PreK–6)
  • St. John the Baptist Catholic School New Freedom (PreK–6)
  • Shrewsbury Christian Academy New Freedom (PreK–8)
  • Tidings of Peace Christian School York (K–12)
  • York Catholic High School (7–12)
  • York Country Day School (PreK–12)

Intermediate UnitEdit

Lincoln Intermediate Unit (IU#12) region includes: Adams County, Franklin County and York County. The agency offers school districts, home schooled students and private schools many services including: special education services, combined purchasing, and instructional technology services. It runs Summer Academy which offers both art and academic strands designed to meet the individual needs of gifted, talented and high achieving students. Additional services include: Curriculum Mapping, Professional Development for school employees, Adult Education, Nonpublic School Services, Business Services, Migrant & ESL (English as a Second Language), Instructional Services, Management Services, and Technology Services. It also provides a GED program to adults who want to earn a high school diploma and literacy programs. The Lincoln Intermediate Unit is governed by a 13-member Board of Directors, each a member of a local school board from the 25 school districts. Board members are elected by school directors of all 25 school districts for three-year terms that begin the first day of July.[37] There are 29 intermediate units in Pennsylvania. They are funded by school districts, state and federal program specific funding and grants. IUs do not have the power to tax.

Colleges and universitiesEdit

Adult educationEdit

CommunitiesEdit

 
Map of York County, Pennsylvania with Municipal Labels showing Cities and Boroughs (red), Townships (white), and Census-designated places (blue).

Under Pennsylvania law, there are four types of incorporated municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, and, in only one case, towns. York County has 72 of these. The following cities, boroughs and townships are in York County:

CityEdit

BoroughsEdit

TownshipsEdit

Census-designated placesEdit

Census-designated places are unincorporated communities designated by the U.S. Census Bureau for the purposes of compiling demographic data. They are not actual jurisdictions under Pennsylvania law.

Other unincorporated communitiesEdit

Population rankingEdit

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of York County.[38]

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Municipal type Population (2010 Census)
1 York City 43,718
2 Hanover Borough 15,289
3 Weigelstown CDP 12,875
4 Shiloh CDP 11,218
5 East York CDP 8,777
6 Parkville CDP 6,706
7 Red Lion Borough 6,373
8 Spry CDP 4,891
9 West York Borough 4,617
10 New Freedom Borough 4,464
11 Dallastown Borough 4,049
12 Shrewsbury Borough 3,823
13 Grantley CDP 3,628
14 Valley Green CDP 3,429
15 Valley View CDP 2,817
16 Manchester Borough 2,763
17 Hallam Borough 2,673
18 Emigsville CDP 2,672
19 Dillsburg Borough 2,563
20 Stonybrook CDP 2,384
21 Wrightsville Borough 2,310
22 Susquehanna Trails CDP 2,264
23 Spring Grove Borough 2,167
24 Stewartstown Borough 2,089
25 Glen Rock Borough 2,025
26 Dover Borough 2,007
27 Pennville CDP 1,947
28 North York Borough 1,914
29 Yorklyn CDP 1,912
30 Tyler Run CDP 1,901
31 Jacobus Borough 1,841
32 Queens Gate CDP 1,464
33 Mount Wolf Borough 1,393
34 Windsor Borough 1,319
35 Loganville Borough 1,240
36 Yoe Borough 1,018
37 Goldsboro Borough 952
38 East Prospect Borough 905
39 New Market CDP 816
40 Jefferson Borough 733
41 Delta Borough 728
42 York Haven Borough 709
43 Winterstown Borough 632
44 New Salem Borough 579
45 Seven Valleys Borough 517
46 Cross Roads Borough 512
47 Felton Borough 506
48 Franklintown Borough 489
49 Fawn Grove Borough 452
50 Lewisberry Borough 362
51 Railroad Borough 278
52 Wellsville Borough 242
53 Yorkana Borough 229

AirportsEdit

Although York County has no scheduled passenger air service, it has two general-aviation airports: Capital City Airport in Fairview Township in the extreme north and York Airport near Thomasville just south of US 30. The county participates in the Susquehanna Area Regional Airport Authority with Adams, Cumberland, Dauphin, and Franklin Counties. The closest passenger service is at Harrisburg International Airport, Lancaster County Airport, and BWI.

Notable peopleEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: United States". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 12, 2021.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved July 2, 2016.
  3. ^ McClure, Jim (December 9, 2007). "York: 'The first capital of the United States?'". York Town Square. York Daily Record/Sunday News. Retrieved May 17, 2009.
  4. ^ "1776–1789". York Daily Record/Sunday News. September 14, 2006. Retrieved May 16, 2009.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 11, 2015.
  6. ^ https://pennsylvania.hometownlocator.com/maps/feature-map,ftc,2,fid,1194388,n,lake%20lehman.cfm
  7. ^ "York County Pennsylvania". Encyclopaedia Britannica. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  8. ^ "NowData – NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved July 23, 2015.
  9. ^ "Station Name: PA YORK AP". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved July 23, 2015.
  10. ^ "Station Name: PA YORK 3 SSW PUMP STN". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved July 23, 2015.
  11. ^ "NowData – NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved May 12, 2021.
  12. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 11, 2015.
  13. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 11, 2015.
  14. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 24, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 11, 2015.
  15. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved March 11, 2015.
  16. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  17. ^ "York, Pennsylvania Population: Census 2010 and 2000 Interactive Map, Demographics, Statistics, Quick Facts". CensusViewer. Retrieved May 28, 2018.
  18. ^ "York, Pennsylvania Demographics Data". TownCharts. Retrieved May 28, 2018. ... York shows it has 30.9% people who are Hispanic or Latino which is more than all other places in the area.
  19. ^ a b "OMB Bulletin No. 13-01: Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas" (PDF). Office of Management and Budget. February 28, 2013. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 21, 2017. Retrieved March 20, 2013 – via National Archives.
  20. ^ a b "Table 1. Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". 2012 Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. March 2013. Archived from the original (CSV) on April 1, 2013. Retrieved March 20, 2013.
  21. ^ "Table 2. Annual Estimates of the Population of Combined Statistical Areas: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". 2012 Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. March 2013. Archived from the original (CSV) on May 17, 2013. Retrieved March 20, 2013.
  22. ^ "Presidential election of 1828 – Map by counties". geoelections.free.fr. Retrieved March 19, 2022.
  23. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved November 29, 2018.
  24. ^ "Voter registration statistics by county". November 2, 2021.. Dos.state.pa.us. Retrieved on November 2, 2021.
  25. ^ "Past Commissioners". York County, Pennsylvania. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  26. ^ "Chief Clerk". York County, Pennsylvania. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  27. ^ "Coroner". York County, Pennsylvania. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  28. ^ "District Attorney of York County, Pennsylvania". York District Attorney. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  29. ^ "Prothonotory". York County, Pennsylvania. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  30. ^ "Recorder of Deeds". York County, Pennsylvania. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  31. ^ "Register of Wills". York County, Pennsylvania. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  32. ^ "Sheriff's Office – About Us". York County, Pennsylvania. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  33. ^ "Treasurer". York County, Pennsylvania. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  34. ^ a b "Elected Officials". York County Republican Committee. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  35. ^ "Members of the House". Pennsylvania House of Representatives. Retrieved July 13, 2013.
  36. ^ Pennsylvania Operating Charter Schools 2009–10, Pennsylvania Department of Education Report September 2009
  37. ^ "Lincoln Intermediate Unit 12". iu12.org. Archived from the original on May 5, 2010. Retrieved April 24, 2010.
  38. ^ "2010 U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 10, 2013.
  39. ^ Maisel, Matt (June 18, 2021). "York County's Hali Flickinger Olympics bound after 200M butterfly win at U.S. Trials". FOX43. Retrieved July 21, 2021.
  40. ^ Freireich, Gordon. "How York shaped three-star Admiral Chip Miller". York Daily Record. Retrieved August 27, 2020.
  41. ^ "Snickers Surging to Top of Global Candy Race". Ad Age. September 20, 2012. Retrieved March 17, 2018.

Further readingEdit

  • Gibson, John, ed. A Biographical History of York County, Pennsylvania (Genealogical Publishing Com, 1886). Online: archive.org
  • Marcello, Ronald E. Small Town America in World War II: War Stories from Wrightsville, Pennsylvania (University of North Texas Press, 2014) 452 pp. ISBN 9781574415513
  • Prowell, George Reeser. History of York County, Pennsylvania. Vol. 1. (JH Beers, 1907). Online: Vol.1 google books archive.org, Vol 2. archive.org
  • Sheets, Georg R. York County: To the Setting of the Sun : An Illustrated History (American Historical Press. 2nd Edition, 2002)

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 39°55′N 76°44′W / 39.92°N 76.73°W / 39.92; -76.73