Pennsylvania's 5th congressional district

Pennsylvania's fifth congressional district encompasses all of Delaware County, an exclave of Chester County, a small portion of southern Montgomery County and a section of southern Philadelphia. Democrat Mary Gay Scanlon represents the district.

Pennsylvania's 5th congressional district
Pennsylvania Congressional District 5.png
Boundaries since the 2018 elections
Representative
  Mary Gay Scanlon
DSwarthmore
Population (2018)718,076
Median household
income
$67,326
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+13[2]

Prior to 2018, the fifth district was located in north-central Pennsylvania and was the largest in area, and least densely populated, of all of Pennsylvania's congressional districts. It was Republican-leaning and represented by Glenn Thompson (R). However, in February 2018, the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania redrew this district after ruling the previous congressional district map unconstitutional due to partisan gerrymandering, assigning its number to a more left-leaning district in southeastern Pennsylvania for the 2018 elections and representation thereafter–essentially, a successor to the old seventh district. Most of Thompson's territory became a new, heavily Republican 15th District.[3] He was re-elected there.

GeographyEdit

Pennsylvania's 5th congressional district is located in the southeastern corner of Pennsylvania and includes all or part of the following four counties:[4]

Cities in this district include:

The entirety of Delaware County and the majority of both the Main Line Suburbs and South Philadelphia are part of this district.

CharacteristicsEdit

The 5th district is mostly suburban, but contains some urban and rural areas as well. The Chester County exclave is rural. The entirety of Delaware County is within the district and is a suburban area. The surrounding northern Montgomery District is also mostly suburban, while the South Philadelphia area in the district is mostly urban. The district is fairly diverse compared to others in Pennsylvania, and is roughly 25% African American.

EconomyEdit

The 5th district is largely reliant on industries in finance, education, public works, and private sector jobs.

List of members representing the districtEdit

District created in 1791 from the at-large district.

1791–1793: One seatEdit

Representative Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history
John W. Kittera Pro-Administration March 4, 1791 –
March 3, 1793
2nd Elected in 1791.
Redistricted to the at-large district.

District redistricted in 1793 to the at-large district.

1795–1813: One seatEdit

District restored in 1795.

Representative Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history
Daniel Hiester Democratic-Republican March 4, 1795 –
July 1, 1796
4th Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1794.
Resigned.
Vacant July 1, 1796 –
December 8, 1796
George Ege Federalist December 8, 1796 –
March 3, 1797
Elected October 10, 1797 to finish Hiester's term.
Also elected the next day to the next term.
Resigned.
March 4, 1797 –
October ??, 1797
5th
Vacant October ??, 1797 –
December 1, 1797
 
Joseph Hiester
Democratic-Republican December 1, 1797 –
March 3, 1799
Elected to finish Ege's term.
Re-elected in 1798.
Re-elected in 1800.
Redistricted to the 3rd district.
March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1803
6th
7th
 
Andrew Gregg
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1807
8th
9th
Redistricted from the 9th district and re-elected in 1802.
Re-elected in 1804.
Lost re-election.
Daniel Montgomery Jr. Democratic-Republican March 4, 1807 –
March 3, 1809
10th Elected in 1806.
Retired.
George Smith Democratic-Republican March 4, 1809 –
March 3, 1813
11th
12th
Re-elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Redistricted to the 10th district and lost re-election.

1813–1823: Two seatsEdit

Years Cong
ress
Seat A Seat B
Representative Party Electoral history Representative Party Electoral history
March 4, 1813 –
April 8, 1813
13th William Crawford Democratic-Republican Redistricted from the 6th district and re-elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
Lost re-election.
Robert Whitehill Democratic-Republican Redistricted from the 4th district and re-elected in 1812.
Died.
April 8, 1813 –
May 11, 1813
Vacant
May 11, 1813 –
March 3, 1815
John Rea Democratic-Republican Elected to finish Whitehill's term.
Retired.
March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1817
14th William Maclay Democratic-Republican Elected in 1814.
Re-elected in 1816.
Retired.
March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1819
15th Andrew Boden Democratic-Republican Elected in 1816.
Re-elected in 1818.
Retired.
March 4, 1819 –
May 15, 1820
16th David Fullerton Democratic-Republican Elected in 1818.
Resigned.
May 15, 1820 –
November 13, 1820
Vacant
November 13, 1820 –
March 3, 1821
Thomas Grubb McCullough Federalist Elected October 10, 1820 to finish Fullerton's term and seated November 13, 1820.
Did not run in the same day's election to the next term.
March 4, 1821 –
December 12, 1821
17th Vacant Representative-elect James Duncan resigned before assembly of Congress. James McSherry Federalist Elected in 1820.
Redistricted to the 11th district and lost re-election.
December 12, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
John Findlay Democratic-Republican Elected October 9, 1821 to finish Duncan's term and seated December 12, 1821.
Redistricted to the 11th district.

1823–Present: One seatEdit

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history
Philip Swenk Markley Jackson Democratic-Republican March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
18th
19th
Elected in 1822.
Re-elected in 1824.
Lost re-election.
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
John Benton Sterigere Jacksonian March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1831
20th
21st
Elected in 1826.
Re-elected in 1828.
Retired.
Joel Keith Mann Jacksonian March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1835
22nd
23rd
Elected in 1830.
Re-elected in 1832.
Retired.
Jacob Fry Jr. Jacksonian March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
24th
25th
Elected in 1834.
Re-elected in 1836.
Retired.
Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
Joseph Fornance Democratic March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1843
26th
27th
Elected in 1838.
[data unknown/missing]
Jacob Senewell Yost Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1847
28th
29th
[data unknown/missing]
John Freedley Whig March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1851
30th
31st
[data unknown/missing]
John McNair Democratic March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1855
32nd
33rd
[data unknown/missing]
 
John Cadwalader
Democratic March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th [data unknown/missing]
 
Owen Jones
Democratic March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
35th [data unknown/missing]
Lost re-election.
John Wood Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
36th [data unknown/missing]
Retired.
William M. Davis Republican March 4, 1861 –
March 3, 1863
37th [data unknown/missing]
 
Martin Russell Thayer
Republican March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1867
38th
39th
Declined to be a candidate for renomination
 
Caleb Newbold Taylor
Republican March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1869
40th [data unknown/missing]
 
John Roberts Reading
Democratic March 4, 1869 –
April 13, 1870
41st Election successfully contested by Caleb N. Taylor
 
Caleb Newbold Taylor
Republican April 13, 1870 –
March 3, 1871
41st [data unknown/missing]
 
Alfred C. Harmer
Republican March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1875
42nd
43rd
[data unknown/missing]
Lost re-election.
 
John Robbins
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
44th Declined to be a candidate for re-election
 
Alfred C. Harmer
Republican March 4, 1877 –
March 6, 1900
45th
46th
47th
48th
49th
50th
51st
52nd
53rd
54th
55th
56th
[data unknown/missing]
Died.
Vacant March 6, 1900 –
November 6, 1900
 
Edward de Veaux Morrell
Republican November 6, 1900 –
March 3, 1907
56th
57th
58th
59th
[data unknown/missing]
Retired.
 
William Walker Foulkrod
Republican March 4, 1907 –
November 13, 1910
60th
61st
[data unknown/missing]
Died.
Vacant November 13, 1910 –
March 3, 1911
 
Michael Donohoe
Democratic March 4, 1911 –
March 3, 1915
62nd
63rd
[data unknown/missing]
Lost re-election.
 
Peter E. Costello
Republican March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1921
64th
65th
66th
[data unknown/missing]
Lost re-election.
 
James J. Connolly
Republican March 4, 1921 –
January 3, 1935
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
[data unknown/missing]
Lost re-election.
 
Frank J. G. Dorsey
Democratic January 3, 1935 –
January 3, 1939
74th
75th
[data unknown/missing]
Lost re-election.
Fred C. Gartner Republican January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1941
76th [data unknown/missing]
Lost re-election.
Francis R. Smith Democratic January 3, 1941 –
January 3, 1943
77th [data unknown/missing]
Lost re-election.
C. Frederick Pracht Republican January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1945
78th [data unknown/missing]
Lost re-election.
 
William J. Green Jr.
Democratic January 3, 1945 –
January 3, 1947
79th [data unknown/missing]
Lost re-election.
George W. Sarbacher Jr. Republican January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1949
80th [data unknown/missing]
Lost re-election.
 
William J. Green Jr.
Democratic January 3, 1949 –
December 21, 1963
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
[data unknown/missing]
Died.
Vacant December 21, 1963 –
April 28, 1964
 
William J. Green III
Democratic April 28, 1964 –
January 3, 1973
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
[data unknown/missing]
Redistricted to the 3rd district.
 
John H. Ware III
Republican January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 1975
93rd Redistricted from the 9th district.
Retired.
 
Richard T. Schulze
Republican January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1993
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
[data unknown/missing]
Retired.
 
William F. Clinger Jr.
Republican January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 1997
103rd
104th
Redistricted from the 23rd district.
Retired.
 
John E. Peterson
Republican January 3, 1997 –
January 3, 2009
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
[data unknown/missing]
Retired.
 
Glenn Thompson
Republican January 3, 2009 –
January 3, 2019
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
[data unknown/missing]
Redistricted to the 15th district.
 
Mary Gay Scanlon
Democratic January 3, 2019 –
present
116th
117th
Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 2018.

Recent election resultsEdit

2000 election[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John E. Peterson 147,570 82.7%
Libertarian Thomas A. Martin 17,020 9.5%
Green William M. Belitskus 13,875 7.8%
Total votes 178,465 100%
Republican hold
2002 election[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John E. Peterson 124,942 87.4%
Libertarian Thomas A. Martin 18,078 12.6%
Total votes 143,020 100%
Republican hold
2004 election[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John E. Peterson 192,852 88.0%
Libertarian Thomas A. Martin 26,239 12.0%
Total votes 219,091 100%
Republican hold
2006 election[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John E. Peterson 115,126 60.1%
Democratic Donald L. Hilliard 76,456 39.9%
Total votes 191,582 100%
Republican hold
2008 election[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Glenn Thompson 155,513 56.7%
Democratic Mark B. McCracken 112,509 41.0%
Libertarian James Fryman 6,155 2.2%
Total votes 274,177 99.9%
Republican hold
2010 election[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Glenn Thompson 125,740 68.6%
Democratic Michael Pipe 51,848 28.3%
Libertarian Vernon L. Etzel 5,654 3.1%
Total votes 182,972 100%
Republican hold
2012 election[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Glenn Thompson 177,704 62.9%
Democratic Charles Dumas 104,710 37.1%
Total votes 282,414 100%
Republican hold
2014 election[citation needed]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Glenn Thompson (Incumbent) 115,018 63.60%
Democratic Kerith Strano Taylor 65,839 36.40%
Total votes 180,857 100%
Republican hold
2016 election[citation needed]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Glenn Thompson (Incumbent) 206,761 67.16%
Democratic Kerith Strano Taylor 101,082 32.84%
Total votes 307,843 100%
Republican hold
2018 election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mary Gay Scanlon 198,639 65.2%
Republican Pearl Kim 106,075 34.8%
Total votes 304,714 100%
Democratic gain from Republican

Historical district boundariesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Geography, US Census Bureau. "Congressional Districts Relationship Files (state-based)". www.census.gov.
  2. ^ "New Pennsylvania Map Is a Major Boost for Democrats". The Cook Political Report. February 20, 2017. Retrieved February 21, 2017.
  3. ^ Cohn, Nate; Bloch, Matthew; Quealy, Kevin (February 19, 2018). "The New Pennsylvania House Districts Are In. We Review the Mapmakers' Choices". The Upshot. The New York Times. Retrieved February 20, 2018.
  4. ^ [1]. pacourts.us. Retrieved on 2020-06-9.
  5. ^ "2000 General Election". Elections Information. Pennsylvania Department of State. November 7, 2000. Archived from the original on January 30, 2012. Retrieved November 3, 2010.
  6. ^ "2002 General Election". Elections Information. Pennsylvania Department of State. November 5, 2002. Archived from the original on October 30, 2008. Retrieved November 3, 2010.
  7. ^ "2004 General Election". Elections Information. Pennsylvania Department of State. November 2, 2004. Archived from the original on May 22, 2008. Retrieved November 3, 2010.
  8. ^ "2006 General Election". Elections Information. Pennsylvania Department of State. November 7, 2006. Archived from the original on November 27, 2008. Retrieved November 3, 2010.
  9. ^ "2008 General Election". Elections Information. Pennsylvania Department of State. November 4, 2008. Archived from the original on December 8, 2008. Retrieved November 3, 2010.
  10. ^ "2010 General Election". Elections Information. Pennsylvania Department of State. November 2, 2010. Archived from the original on November 6, 2010. Retrieved November 3, 2010.
  11. ^ "2012 General Election". Elections Information. Pennsylvania Department of State. November 6, 2012. Archived from the original on November 16, 2012. Retrieved November 29, 2012.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 41°23′14″N 78°34′14″W / 41.38722°N 78.57056°W / 41.38722; -78.57056