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United States House of Representatives elections in Pennsylvania, 2018

The 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Pennsylvania will be held on November 6, 2018, to elect the 18 U.S. Representatives from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, one from each of the state's 18 congressional districts.

United States House of Representatives elections in Pennsylvania, 2018

← 2016 November 6, 2018 (2018-11-06) 2020 →

All 18 Pennsylvania seats to the United States House of Representatives

 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 13 5
Current seats 12 6

The elections will coincide with the gubernatorial election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections.

In January 2018, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court struck down the state's congressional map, ruling it had been unfairly gerrymandered to favor Republicans. New maps were subsequently adopted in February 2018.[1]

Contents

District 1Edit

United States House of Representatives District 1
 
← 2016 November 6, 2018 2020 →

     
Nominee Scott Wallace Brian Fitzpatrick
Party Democratic Republican

U.S. Representative before election

Brian Fitzpatrick
Republican

Elected U.S. Representative

TBD

The 1st district previously consisted of central and South Philadelphia, the City of Chester, the Philadelphia International Airport and other small sections of Delaware County.[2] Under the new congressional map that will be in place in 2019 (represented per 2018's elections), the first district overlaps with much of the former 8th district, which is represented by Republican Congressman Brian Fitzpatrick. Fitzpatrick took office in 2017, succeeding his brother, former Congressman Mike Fitzpatrick. The new 1st district consists of Bucks County and a small portion of Montgomery County.[2]

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Scott Wallace 27,652 56.5
Democratic Rachel Reddick 17,288 35.3
Democratic Steven Bacher 4,006 8.2
Total votes 48,946 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Fitzpatrick (incumbent) 31,374 67.0
Republican Dean Malik 15,451 33.0
Total votes 46,825 100.0

General electionEdit

PollingEdit

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Brian
Fitzpatrick (R)
Scott
Wallace (D)
Other Undecided
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 11–14, 2018 570 ± 4.6% 43% 50% 8%
Public Opinion Strategies (R-Fitzpatrick) October 2–4, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 50% 42%
Monmouth University September 27 – October 1, 2018 353 ± 5.2% 50% 46% 1% 3%
Monmouth University May 31 – June 3, 2018 254 LV ± 6.5% 48% 47% 0% 5%
451 RV ± 4.6% 49% 42% 1% 8%
DCCC (D) May 12–14, 2018 540 ± 4.2% 48% 46% 6%

EndorsementsEdit

Steve Scheetz (L)
  • Firearm Owners Against Crime[3]

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Scott Wallace
Republican Brian Fitzpatrick (incumbent)
Libertarian Steve Scheetz
Total votes

District 2Edit

United States House of Representatives District 2
 
← 2016 November 6, 2018 2020 →

   
Nominee Brendan Boyle David Torres
Party Democratic Republican

U.S. Representative before election

Brendan Boyle
Democratic

Elected U.S. Representative

TBD

The 2nd district consists of the northern half of Philadelphia. It mostly overlaps with the old 1st District. That district's incumbent, Democrat Bob Brady, has served since 1998, but is not running for reelection. The incumbent of the old 2nd district is Dwight Evans, but Evans opted to follow most of his constituents into the 3rd District.[2]

The new map drew the home of fellow Democrat Brendan Boyle, who has represented the neighboring 13th District since 2015, into the 2nd, leading to speculation that he would run for reelection there. Soon after the new map was released, Boyle confirmed that he would indeed run in the 2nd.[4]

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brendan Boyle (incumbent) 23,261 64.5
Democratic Michele Lawrence 12,814 35.5
Total votes 36,075 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Torres 7,443 100.0
Total votes 7,443 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 2nd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brendan Boyle (incumbent)
Republican David Torres
Total votes

District 3Edit

United States House of Representatives District 3
 
← 2016 November 6, 2018 2020 →

   
Nominee Dwight Evans Bryan E. Leib
Party Democratic Republican

U.S. Representative before election

Dwight Evans
Democratic

Elected U.S. Representative

TBD

The 3rd district was previously located in Northwestern Pennsylvania, but now covers downtown and northern Philadelphia, and overlaps with much of the previous 2nd district.[2] The incumbent from the 2nd district is Democrat Dwight Evans, who has held office since 2016. Evans defeated incumbent Democratic Representative Chaka Fattah in the 2016 Democratic primary, and then went on to be elected with 90% in both the general election and a simultaneous special election for the remainder of the term after Fattah resigned.

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dwight Evans (incumbent) 72,106 80.8
Democratic Kevin Johnson 17,153 19.2
Total votes 89,259 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bryan E. Leib 3,331 100.0
Total votes 3,331 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 3rd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dwight Evans (incumbent)
Republican Bryan E. Leib
Total votes

District 4Edit

The old 4th district was in South Central Pennsylvania, but the new 4th district is centered in Montgomery County. The district overlaps with the former 13th district. The incumbent from this district, Democrat Brendan Boyle, could have sought re-election in either this district or the new 2nd district, which absorbed his home and most of old 13th's share of Philadelphia.[2] Boyle opted to run in the 2nd, making the 4th an open seat.

State Senator Daylin Leach had announced that he would run for Congress in the old 7th District, but was expected to switch races after his home was drawn into the new 4th. However, on February 24, 2018, Leach succumbed to pressures from fellow Democrats, including Governor Tom Wolf, to abandon his congressional campaign in the face of accusations of sexual harassment. However, he will remain in his Pennsylvania Senate seat.[5]

Sandra Salas is running as a Libertarian.[6]

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Madeleine Dean 42,625 72.6
Democratic Shira Goodman 9,645 16.4
Democratic Joe Hoeffel 6,431 11.0
Total votes 58,701 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan David 28,889 100.0
Total votes 28,889 100.0

General electionEdit

EndorsementsEdit

Madeleine Dean (D)
Former U.S. Executive Branch officials

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 4th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Madeleine Dean
Republican Dan David
Libertarian Sandra Salas
Total votes

District 5Edit

The old 5th district was in North Central Pennsylvania, but the new 5th district consists of Delaware County and portions of South Philadelphia. The district overlaps with much of the old 7th district, whose incumbent Republican Congressman Pat Meehan chose not to seek re-election, due to allegations regarding a sexual harassment complaint that was settled with the use of taxpayer funds,[2][8] and subsequently resigned from office in April.

Democratic primaryEdit

PollingEdit

Poll
source
Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Margo
Davidson
Thaddeus
Kirkland
Rich
Lazer
Ashley
Lunkenheimer
Mary Gay
Scanlon
Molly
Sheehan
Greg
Vitali
Theresa
Wright
Other Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D-Vitali) April 23–24, 2018 562 5% 4% 5% 6% 18% 6% 17% 8% 5% 25%

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mary Gay Scanlon 16,804 28.4
Democratic Ashley Lunkenheimer 9,044 15.3
Democratic Richard Lazer 8,892 15.0
Democratic Molly Sheehan 6,099 10.3
Democratic Greg Vitali 5,558 9.4
Democratic Lindy Li 4,126 7.0
Democratic Theresa Wright 3,046 5.2
Democratic Thaddeus Kirkland 2,327 3.9
Democratic Margo L. Davidson 2,275 3.9
Democratic Larry Arata 913 1.5
Total votes 59,084 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pearl Kim 33,685 100.0
Total votes 33,685 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 5th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mary Gay Scanlon
Republican Pearl Kim
Libertarian Jim Brose
Total votes

District 6Edit

The 6th district consists of Chester County and Reading.[2] The incumbent is Republican Ryan Costello, who has represented the district since 2015. He was re-elected to a second term with 57% of the vote in 2016. On March 24, 2018, Costello announced that he will no longer seek re-election due to the growing Democratic voter demographic in the 6th district.[9] Costello formally withdrew his name on March 27.

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Chrissy Houlahan 34,947 100.0
Total votes 34,947 100.0

EndorsementsEdit

Chrissy Houlahan
Former U.S. Vice Presidents
  • Joe Biden, former U.S. Vice President and former 30th Class 2 U.S. Senator of Delaware (D-DE)[10]
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
Local and statewide politicians
Individuals
Labor unions
Organizations

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Greg McCauley 31,611 100.0
Total votes 31,611 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 6th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Chrissy Houlahan
Republican Greg McCauley
Total votes

District 7Edit

The 7th district was formerly centered on Delaware County, but the new district consists of much of the Lehigh Valley. The new 7th district overlaps with much of the former 15th district, which was represented by retired Republican Congressman Charlie Dent who resigned early.[2]

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Susan Wild 15,001 33.3
Democratic John Morganelli 13,565 30.1
Democratic Greg Edwards 11,510 25.6
Democratic Roger Ruggles 2,443 5.4
Democratic Rick Daugherty 1,718 3.8
Democratic David Clark 766 1.7
Total votes 45,003 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Marty Nothstein 16,004 50.5
Republican Dean Browning 15,696 49.5
Total votes 31,700 100.0

General electionEdit

EndorsementsEdit

Marty Nothstein (R)
Local officials
Susan Wild (D)
Former U.S. Executive Branch officials
Celebrities

PollingEdit

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Marty
Nothstein (R)
Susan
Wild (D)
Other Undecided
Muhlenberg College October 14–18, 2018 411 ± 5.5% 41% 48% 5%[23]
DeSales University September 28 – October 7, 2018 405 ± 4.5% 31% 50% 8% 11%
NYT Upshot/Siena College September 21–25, 2018 539 ± 4.7% 42% 50% 8%
Monmouth University September 5–9, 2018 299 LV ± 5.7% 45% 47% 2% 7%
401 RV ± 4.9% 40% 46% 3% 11%
Muhlenberg College April 24–May 3, 2018 408 ± 5.5% 31% 42% 5% 21%

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 7th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Susan Wild
Republican Marty Nothstein
Libertarian Tim Silfies
Independent Chip Collica[6]
Total votes

District 8Edit

The 8th district was previously centered on Bucks County, but now consists of portions of Northeast Pennsylvania, including the city of Scranton. The new district overlaps with much of the former 17th district, which is represented by Democratic Congressman Matt Cartwright.[2] Cartwright has held office since 2013.

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Matt Cartwright (incumbent) 36,040 100.0
Total votes 36,040 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Chrin 15,136 48.4
Republican Joe Peters 10,927 34.9
Republican Robert Kuniegel 5,218 16.7
Total votes 31,281 100.0

General electionEdit

PollingEdit

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Matt
Cartwright (D)
John
Chrin (R)
Undecided
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 16–19, 2018 506 ± 4.7% 52% 40% 8%

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 8th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Matt Cartwright (incumbent)
Republican John Chrin
Total votes

District 9Edit

The old 9th district was in South Central Pennsylvania, but the new 9th district is in east central Pennsylvania. The new district overlaps with the old 11th district, which is represented by retiring Republican Congressman Lou Barletta.[2]

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Denny Wolff 11,020 40.7
Democratic Gary Wegman 8,450 31.2
Democratic Susan Quick 7,616 28.1
Total votes 27,086 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Meuser 26,568 53.0
Republican George Halcovage Jr. 12,032 24.0
Republican Scott Uehlinger 11,541 23.0
Total votes 50,141 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 9th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Denny Wolff
Republican Dan Meuser
Libertarian Justin Cassidy
Total votes

District 10Edit

United States House of Representatives District 10
 
← 2016 November 6, 2018 2020 →

   
Nominee George Scott Scott Perry
Party Democratic Republican

U.S. Representative before election

Tom Marino
Republican

Elected U.S. Representative

TBD

The 10th district was previously in Northeastern Pennsylvania, but it now overlaps with much of the former 4th district in South Central Pennsylvania. Under the map released in 2018, the 10th district includes Harrisburg and a portion of York County.[2] The incumbent from the 4th district is Republican Scott Perry, who has represented his district since 2013. He was re-elected to a third term with 66% of the vote in 2016. Several Democrats sought to challenge Perry in 2018, with George Scott, a 20-year Army veteran and Lutheran pastor, receiving the party's nomination.[24][25][26]

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic George Scott 13,924 36.3
Democratic Shavonnia Corbin-Johnson 13,376 34.9
Democratic Eric Ding 6,912 18.0
Democratic Alan Howe 4,157 10.8
Total votes 38,369 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott Perry (incumbent) 57,407 100.0
Total votes 57,407 100.0

General electionEdit

DebatesEdit

PollingEdit

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Scott
Perry (R)
George
Scott (D)
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D) September 24–25, 2018 650 44% 43% 12%
Public Policy Polling (D-Scott) June 8–10, 2018 654 ± 4.1% 45% 41% 14%

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic George Scott
Republican Scott Perry (incumbent)
Total votes

District 11Edit

United States House of Representatives District 11
 
← 2016 November 6, 2018 2020 →

   
Nominee Jess King Lloyd Smucker
Party Democratic Republican

U.S. Representative before election

Lou Barletta
Republican

Elected U.S. Representative

TBD

The old 11th district was in Northeastern Pennsylvania, but the district now overlaps with much of the former 16th district in South Central Pennsylvania. The new district consists of Lancaster County and portions of York County. The incumbent from the former 16th district is Republican Lloyd Smucker, who has held office since 2017.[2]

Meteorologist Drew Anderson was planning on running without party affiliation and expected to be listed that way on the November ballot.[27] However, he failed to file papers in time, and is now out of the race.[28]

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jess King 22,794 100.0
Total votes 22,794 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lloyd Smucker (incumbent) 34,002 58.6
Republican Chet Beiler 24,063 41.4
Total votes 58,065 100.0

General electionEdit

PollingEdit

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Lloyd
Smucker (R)
Jess
King (D)
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D-King) September 12–13, 2018 552 ± 4.2% 44% 35% 21%

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jess King
Republican Lloyd Smucker (incumbent)
Independent Michael LaSala[6]
Total votes

District 12Edit

United States House of Representatives District 12
 
← 2016 November 6, 2018 2020 →

   
Nominee Marc Friedenburg Tom Marino
Party Democratic Republican

U.S. Representative before election

Keith Rothfus
Republican

Elected U.S. Representative

TBD

The old 12th district was in Southwestern Pennsylvania, but the new district is in North Central Pennsylvania. It overlaps with the former 10th district, which is represented by Republican Tom Marino.[2] Marino has held office since 2011.

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marc Friedenburg 12,713 50.6
Democratic Judith Herschel 12,407 49.4
Total votes 25,120 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tom Marino (incumbent) 39,537 67.0
Republican Douglas McLinko 19,435 33.0
Total votes 58,972 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 12th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marc Friedenburg
Republican Tom Marino (incumbent)
Total votes

District 13Edit

The old 13th district was in Southeastern Pennsylvania, but the new district is in Western Pennsylvania. The new district overlaps with much of the old 9th district, which is represented by retiring Republican Congressman Bill Shuster.[2]

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brent Ottaway 21,096 100.0
Total votes 21,096 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Joyce 14,615 21.9
Republican John Eichelberger 13,101 19.6
Republican Stephen Bloom 12,195 18.3
Republican Doug Mastriano 10,485 15.7
Republican Art Halvorson 10,161 15.2
Republican Travis Schooley 3,030 4.5
Republican Bernie Washabaugh 1,908 2.9
Republican Ben Hornberger 1,182 1.8
Total votes 66,677 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 13th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brent Ottaway
Republican John Joyce
Total votes

District 14Edit

United States House of Representatives District 14
 
← 2016 November 6, 2018 2020 →

   
Nominee Bibiana Boerio Guy Reschenthaler
Party Democratic Republican

U.S. Representative before election

Mike Doyle
Democratic

Elected U.S. Representative

TBD

The old 14th district consisted of the city of Pittsburgh and parts of surrounding suburbs, but the new district consists of suburbs to the south and west of Pittsburgh. The district overlaps with much of the former 18th district.[2] The winner of the 2018 special election, Democrat Conor Lamb, is running in the more competitive 17th district.[29]

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bibiana Boerio 17,755 43.0
Democratic Adam Sedlock 9,944 24.1
Democratic Bob Solomon 7,831 19.0
Democratic Tom Prigg 5,724 13.9
Total votes 41,254 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Guy Reschenthaler 23,245 55.4
Republican Rick Saccone 18,734 44.6
Total votes 41,979 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 14th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bibiana Boerio
Republican Guy Reschenthaler
Total votes

District 15Edit

The old 15th district was in Eastern Pennsylvania, but the new district is in Western Pennsylvania. The new district overlaps with much of the former 5th district, which is represented by Republican G.T. Thompson.[2] Thompson has held office since 2009.

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Susan Boser 20,135 74.5
Democratic Wade Jodun 6,902 25.5
Total votes 27,037 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican G.T. Thompson (incumbent) 44,893 100.0
Total votes 44,893 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 15th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Susan Boser
Republican G.T. Thompson (incumbent)
Total votes

District 16Edit

The former 16th district was in Southeastern Pennsylvania, but the redrawn 16th district will be in Northwestern Pennsylvania, overlapping with the former 3rd district.[2] The incumbent from the 3rd district is Republican Mike Kelly, who has represented the district since 2011. He was re-elected to a fourth term unopposed in 2016. Kelly had considered running for the U.S. Senate, but announced he will run for re-election instead.[30]

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ronald DiNicola 23,362 60.2
Democratic Chris Rieger 9,681 24.9
Democratic Robert Multari 5,764 14.9
Total votes 38,807 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Kelly (incumbent) 39,146 100.0
Total votes 39,146 100.0

General electionEdit

DebatesEdit

PollingEdit

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Mike
Kelly (R)
Ron
DiNicola (D)
Undecided
DCCC (D) October 9–10, 2018 548 ± 4.2% 49% 46% 5%
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 5–8, 2018 532 ± 4.8% 50% 42% 8%
Normington, Petts & Assoicates (D-DiNicola) June 5–7, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 50% 44% 6%
Public Policy Polling (D-DiNicola) May 21–22, 2018 623 ± 3.9% 48% 43% 10%

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 16th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ronald DiNicola
Republican Mike Kelly (incumbent)
Libertarian Ebert "Bill" Beeman
Total votes

District 17Edit

United States House of Representatives District 17
 
← 2016 November 6, 2018 2020 →

     
Nominee Conor Lamb Keith Rothfus
Party Democratic Republican

U.S. Representative before election

Matt Cartwright
Democratic

Elected U.S. Representative

TBD

The former 17th district was in Northeastern Pennsylvania, but the new 17th district consists of suburbs west of Pittsburgh. The district overlaps with parts of the former 12th district, which is represented by Republican Keith Rothfus.[2] Rothfus has held office since 2013, and plans to run for reelection in the new 17th.[31]

The new map drew the home of Democrat Conor Lamb, who won a special election for the old 18th District, into the new 17th. The 17th is far less Republican than its predecessor, and voted for Democrats downballot, leading to speculation that Lamb would run for a full term in the 17th regardless of the special election result.[2] On March 14, Democratic officials in Beaver County, which is entirely within the 17th, received a written request from Lamb for their endorsement in the 2018 general election.[32] On March 20, Lamb formally filed to run for a full term in the 17th.[33]

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Conor Lamb (incumbent) 52,508 100.0
Total votes 52,508 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Keith Rothfus (incumbent) 38,466 100.0
Total votes 38,466 100.0

General electionEdit

DebatesEdit

EndorsementsEdit

Keith Rothfus (R)
Federal officials

PollingEdit

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Keith
Rothfus (R)
Conor
Lamb (D)
Other Undecided
Monmouth University October 5–8, 2018 354 ± 5.2% 42% 54% 0% 4%
Monmouth University July 19–22, 2018 355 LV ± 5.2% 40% 53% 2% 5%
401 RV ± 4.9% 39% 51% 2% 9%

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 17th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Conor Lamb (incumbent)
Republican Keith Rothfus (incumbent)
Total votes

District 18Edit

The 18th district formerly consisted of the southern suburbs of Pittsburgh, but the new district is now centered on Pittsburgh itself. The district overlaps with the former 14th district, which is represented by Democrat Michael F. Doyle.[2] Doyle has held office since 1995. He is running unopposed in the general election.

United States House of Representatives District 18
 
← March 2018 November 6, 2018 2020 →

   
Nominee Michael F. Doyle
Party Democratic

U.S. Representative before election

Michael F. Doyle
Democratic

Elected U.S. Representative


Democratic

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Doyle (incumbent) 51,879 75.9
Democratic Janis Brooks 16,488 24.1
Total votes 68,367 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Pennsylvania's 18th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Doyle (incumbent)
Total votes
Democratic hold

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Mears, Bill (February 19, 2018). "Pennsylvania Supreme Court issues new congressional map, which could benefit Dems". Fox News. Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Cohn, Nate; Bloch, Matthew; Quealy, Kevin (19 February 2018). "The New Pennsylvania House Districts Are In. We Review the Mapmakers' Choices". New York Times. Retrieved 20 February 2018.
  3. ^ https://foac-pac.org/voter_guides/2018%20Gen%20Voters%20Guide-Z-5A-Vers-2.pdf
  4. ^ John Kopp (February 22, 2018). "Brendan Boyle to seek re-election in redrawn Philly congressional district". Philly Voice.
  5. ^ State Senator Daylin Leach ends congressional bid, cites 'attacks' on his family, Philadelphia Inquirer, David Gambacorta, February 25, 2018. Retrieved February 25, 2018.
  6. ^ a b c Gunzberger, Ron. "Pennsylvania". Politics1. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  7. ^ Barack Obama [@BarackObama] (August 1, 2018). "Today I'm proud to endorse such a wide and impressive array of Democratic candidates – leaders as diverse, patriotic, and big-hearted as the America they're running to represent:" (Tweet). Retrieved August 1, 2018 – via Twitter.
  8. ^ Tamari, Jonathan (January 25, 2018). "Rep. Pat Meehan will not seek reelection after sexual harassment furor". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Philadelphia, PA. Retrieved February 25, 2018.
  9. ^ "Rep. Ryan Costello will drop bid for re-election in Pennsylvania". CNN. March 24, 2018. Retrieved March 25, 2018.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Chrissy Houlahan Endorsements
  11. ^ "PA-17, 01, Sen, 08, Gov, 07, 10, 06 & 05: Rep. Conor Lamb (D) Helps Bring The Blue Wave To PA". Daily Kos. May 21, 2018.
  12. ^ "PA-Gov, 17, 08, 05, 10, 01, 06, Sen & 07: Gov. Tom Wolf (D) Brings The Blue Wave To Pennsylvania". Daily Kos.
  13. ^ "PA-Gov, Sen, 01, 05, 06, 07, 08, 10, 17 & 18: John Fetterman (D) Helps The Blue Wave Hit PA Hard". Daily Kos.
  14. ^ "PA-06: Jason Kander (D. MO) Helps Fellow Veteran Chrissy Houlahan (D) Flip This Seat Blue". Daily Kos.
  15. ^ Kirsch, Ted. "AFTPA endorses Wolf, Casey + other candidates in Nov. 6 election | AFT Pennsylvania". pa.aft.org. AFT PA.
  16. ^ Morgan, Gabe; Catanese, Steve (April 10, 2018). "SEIU PA State Council Announces Endorsed Candidates for 2018 Primary Election". seiupa.org. SEIU PA State Council.
  17. ^ Christina Houlahan's Ratings and Endorsements
  18. ^ Human Rights Campaign Endorses Chrissy Houlahan for Congress
  19. ^ Hogue, Ilyse (March 9, 2018). "NARAL Pro-Choice America Endorses Chrissy Houlahan for Congress - NARAL Pro-Choice America". NARAL Pro-Choice America.
  20. ^ Engelkemier, Paul (November 30, 2017). "Nothstein Endorsed by Lehigh County DA in Bid for PA-15". PoliticsPA.
  21. ^ Barack Obama [@BarackObama] (August 1, 2018). "Today I'm proud to endorse such a wide and impressive array of Democratic candidates – leaders as diverse, patriotic, and big-hearted as the America they're running to represent:" (Tweet). Retrieved August 1, 2018 – via Twitter.
  22. ^ 64: Office Hours LIVE - 10.12.18
  23. ^ Tim Silfies (L) with 5%
  24. ^ Mahon, Ed (March 5, 2018). "Who is running for Pennsylvania's 10th Congressional District?". York Daily Record. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  25. ^ "May 15 Pennsylvania Primary results: U.S. House". WGAL. Retrieved May 16, 2018.
  26. ^ Shelly, Nora (August 1, 2017). "York County pastor launches campaign to unseat Scott Perry". PennLive. PA Media Group. Retrieved May 16, 2018.
  27. ^ Mahon, Ed (March 20, 2018). "Pa. 2018 election: Who is running for the 11th Congressional District?". York Daily Record. Retrieved May 10, 2018. Anderson ... decided to run as unaffiliated with any party
  28. ^ Mahon, Ed (August 2, 2018). "Meteorologist Drew Anderson, who got national attention, now not running for Congress". York Daily Record. Retrieved August 2, 2018.
  29. ^ Tolliver, Sandy (March 11, 2018). "Do the numbers add up for Democrat Conor Lamb in Pennsylvania?". The Hill. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  30. ^ Potter, Chris (August 1, 2017). "Rep. Mike Kelly pulls out of crowded Senate race for Casey seat". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved August 1, 2017.
  31. ^ Wes Venticher (March 15, 2018). "Conor Lamb eyes run for Congress in new district". Pittsburgh Tribune-Review.
  32. ^ Emily Goodin; John Verhovek (March 15, 2018). "Conor Lamb, Rick Saccone to run again in November in new and different congressional districts". ABC News.
  33. ^ Eliza Collins (March 20, 2018). "Conor Lamb won Pennsylvania's 18th district. Tuesday he filed in the state's 17th District". USA Today.
  34. ^ Donald J. Trump. "Congressman Keith Rothfus continues to do a great job for the people of Pennsylvania. Keith is strong on Crime, the Border, and our Second Amendment. Loves our Military and our Vets. He has my total Endorsement!". Twitter.

External linksEdit

Official campaign websites of first district candidates
Official campaign websites of second district candidates
Official campaign websites of third district candidates
Official campaign websites of fourth district candidates
Official campaign websites of fifth district candidates
Official campaign websites of sixth district candidates
Official campaign websites of seventh district candidates
Official campaign websites of eighth district candidates
Official campaign websites of ninth district candidates
Official campaign websites of tenth district candidates
Official campaign websites of eleventh district candidates
Official campaign websites of twelfth district candidates
Official campaign websites of thirteenth district candidates
Official campaign websites of fourteenth district candidates
Official campaign websites of fifteenth district candidates
Official campaign websites of sixteenth district candidates
Official campaign websites of seventeenth district candidates
Official campaign websites of eighteenth district candidates