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Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district

Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district is located in central Massachusetts. It contains the cities of Worcester, which is the second-largest city in New England after Boston, and Northampton in the Pioneer Valley. It is represented by Democrat Jim McGovern.

Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district
Massachusetts US Congressional District 2 (since 2013).tif
Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Jim McGovern
DWorcester
Median income$67,531[1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+9[2]

The shape of the district was changed for the elections of 2012, after Massachusetts congressional redistricting to reflect the 2010 census.[3] The new district covers central Massachusetts, including much of Worcester County, and is largely the successor to the old 3rd District. Most of the old 2nd district, including Springfield, has been moved into the new 1st district.

Contents

Election results from presidential racesEdit

Year Office Result
2000 President Gore 56 - 33%
2004 President Kerry 59 - 40%
2008 President Obama 60.4 - 37.5%
2012 President Obama 58.7 - 39.2%
2016 President Clinton 56.2 - 36.8%

LocationsEdit

1795 to 1803Edit

Known as the 2nd Western District.[4]

1803 to 1813Edit

Known as the "Essex North" district.[4]

1813 to 1833Edit

Known as the "Essex South" district.[4]

1843 to 1853Edit

 
Detail of the district from 1843 to 1853.

The Act of September 16, 1842 established the district on the North Shore and New Hampshire border, with the following municipalities:[5]

In Essex County: Beverly, Danvers, Essex, Gloucester, Hamilton, Ipswich, Lynn, Lynnfield, Manchester, Marblehead, Middleton, Rockport, Salem, Saugus, Topsfield, and Wenham
In Middlesex County: Malden, Medford, Reading, South Reading, and Stoneham
In Suffolk County: Chelsea

1860sEdit

"Parts of the counties of Bristol, Norfolk, and Plymouth."[6]

1870s-1900sEdit

1903 to 1913Edit

 
The district from 1903 to 1913.

During this decade, the district contained the following municipalities:[7]

In Franklin County: Erving, Leverett, Montague, New Salem, Northfield, Orange, Shutesbury, Sunderland, Warwick, and Wendell.
In Hampshire County: Amherst, Belchertown, Easthampton, Enfield, Granby, Hadley, Northampton, Pelham, Prescott, South Hadley, and Ware.
In Hampden County: Brimfield, Chicopee, East Longmeadow, Hampden, Holland, Longmeadow, Ludlow, Monson, Palmer, Springfield, Wales, and Wilbraham.
In Worcester County: Athol, Barre, Brookfield, Dana, Hardwick, New Braintree, North Brookfield, Oakham, Petersham, Phillipston, Royalston, Warren, and West Brookfield.

1913 to 1923Edit

During this decade, the district contained the following municipalities:[8]

In Franklin County: Bernardston, Deerfield, Erving, Gill, Leverett, Montague, Northfield, Shutesbury, Sunderland, Warwick, Wendell, and Whately.
In Hampshire County: Amherst, Belchertown, Easthampton, Enfield, Granby, Hadley, Hatfield, Northampton, Pelham, South Hadley, Ware, and Williamsburg.
In Hampden County: Agawam, Chicopee, East Longmeadow, Hampden, Longmeadow, Ludlow, Springfield, West Springfield, and Wilbraham.

1920s-2002Edit

2003 to 2013Edit

 
The district from 2003 to 2013

During this decade, the district contained the following municipalities:

In Hampden County: Agawam, Brimfield, Chicopee, East Longmeadow, Hampden, Holland, Longmeadow, Ludlow, Monson, Palmer, Springfield, Wales, Wilbraham.
In Hampshire County: Hadley, Northampton, South Hadley.
In Norfolk County: Bellingham.
In Worcester County: Blackstone, Brookfield, Charlton, Douglas, Dudley, East Brookfield, Grafton, Hopedale, Leicester, Mendon, Milford, Millbury, Millville, North Brookfield, Northbridge, Oxford, Southbridge, Spencer, Sturbridge, Sutton, Upton, Uxbridge, Warren, Webster.

Since 2013Edit

In Franklin County: Deerfield, Erving, Gill, Greenfield, Leverett, Montague, New Salem, Northfield, Orange, Shutesbury, Sunderland, Warwick, Wendell, and Whately.
In Hampden County: Precinct 1A in Palmer
In Hampshire County: Amherst, Belchertown, Hadley, Hatfield, Northampton, Pelham, and Ware.
In Norfolk County: Precincts 4A and 5 in Bellingham
In Worcester County: Athol, Auburn, Barre, Blackstone, Boylston, Douglas, Grafton, Hardwick, Holden, Hubbardston, Leicester, Leominster, Mendon, Millbury, Millville, New Braintree, North Brookfield, Northborough, Northbridge, Oakham, Oxford, Paxton, Petersham, Phillipston, Princeton, Royalston, Rutland, Shrewsbury, Spencer, Sterling, Sutton, Templeton, Upton, Uxbridge, Webster, West Boylston, West Brookfield, Westborough, Worcester, and Precinct 1 in Winchendon.

List of members representing the districtEdit

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history District location
 
Benjamin Goodhue
  Pro-Administration March 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1793
1st
2nd
Elected January 29, 1789 on the second ballot.
Re-elected October 4, 1790.
Redistricted to the 1st district.
1789 – 1793
Essex County
 
Dwight Foster
  Pro-Administration General ticket:
March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1795
3rd Elected April 1, 1793 on the third ballot as part of the four-seat general ticket, representing the district at-large.
Redistricted to the 4th district.
1793 – 1795
Berkshire County, Worcester County, and Hampshire County
 
Theodore Sedgwick
  Pro-Administration Redistricted from the 4th district and re-elected November 2, 1792, as part of the four-seat general ticket, representing the district from Berkshire County.
Redistricted to the 1st district.
 
Artemas Ward
  Pro-Administration Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected November 2, 1792, as part of the four-seat general ticket, representing the district from Worcester County.
[Data unknown/missing.]
William Lyman   Anti-Administration Elected April 1, 1793 on the third ballot as part of the four-seat general ticket, representing the district from Hampshire County.
Re-elected November 3, 1794, as the sole representative from the district.
Lost re-election.
  Democratic-Republican March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1797
4th 1795 – 1803
"2nd Western district"
 
William Shepard
  Federalist March 4, 1797 –
March 3, 1803
5th
6th
7th
Elected January 16, 1797 on the second ballot.
Re-elected in 1798.
Re-elected in 1800.
Retired.
 
Jacob Crowninshield
  Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 –
April 15, 1808
8th
9th
10th
Elected in 1802.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Died.
1803 – 1823
"Essex South district"
Vacant April 15, 1808 –
May 24, 1808
 
Joseph Story
  Democratic-Republican May 23, 1808 –
March 3, 1809
10th Elected to finish Crowninshield's term.
Retired.
 
Benjamin Pickman Jr.
  Federalist March 4, 1809 –
March 3, 1811
11th Elected in 1808.
Retired.
William Reed   Federalist March 4, 1811 –
March 3, 1815
12th
13th
Elected in 1810.
Re-elected in 1812.
Retired.
 
Timothy Pickering
  Federalist March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1817
14th Redistricted from the 3rd district and re-elected in 1814.
Lost re-election.
 
Nathaniel Silsbee
  Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1821
15th
16th
Elected in 1816.
Re-elected in 1818.
Retired.
Gideon Barstow   Democratic-Republican March 4, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
17th Elected in 1821 on the third ballot.
Retired.
 
Benjamin W. Crowninshield
  Adams-Clay Democratic-Republican March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
18th
19th
20th
21st
Elected in 1823 on the second ballot.
Re-elected in 1824.
Re-elected in 1826.
Re-elected in 1828.
Lost re-election.
1823 – 1833
"Essex South district"
  Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1831
 
Rufus Choate
  Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1831 –
June 30, 1834
22nd
23rd
Elected in 1830.
Re-elected in 1833.
Resigned.
1833 – 1843
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vacant June 30, 1834 –
December 1, 1834
 
Stephen C. Phillips
  Anti-Jacksonian December 1, 1834 –
March 3, 1837
23rd
24th
25th
Elected to finish Choate's term.
Also elected to the full term in 1834.
Re-elected in 1836.
Resigned to become Mayor of Salem.
  Whig March 4, 1837 –
September 28, 1838
 
Leverett Saltonstall
  Whig December 5, 1838 –
March 3, 1843
25th
26th
27th
Elected to finish Phillips's term in 1838.
Also elected to the full term in 1838.
Re-elected in 1840.
Lost re-election.
 
Daniel P. King
  Whig March 4, 1843 –
July 25, 1850
28th
29th
30th
31st
Elected in 1842.
Re-elected in 1844.
Re-elected in 1846.
Re-elected in 1848.
Died.
1843 – 1853
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vacant July 25, 1850 –
March 3, 1851
 
Robert Rantoul Jr.
  Democratic March 4, 1851 –
August 7, 1852
32nd Elected in 1850.
Died.
Vacant August 7, 1852 –
December 13, 1852
 
Francis B. Fay
  Whig December 13, 1852 –
March 3, 1853
32nd Elected to finish Rantoul's term.
Retired.
 
Samuel L. Crocker
  Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd Elected in 1852.
Lost re-election.
1853 – 1863
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
James Buffington[9]
  American March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th
35th
36th
37th
Elected in 1854.
Re-elected in 1856.
Re-elected in 1858.
Re-elected in 1860.
Retired.
  Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1863
 
Oakes Ames[6]
  Republican March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1873
38th
39th
40th
41st
42nd
Elected in 1862.
Re-elected in 1864.
Re-elected in 1866.
Re-elected in 1868.
Re-elected in 1870.
Retired.
1863 – 1873
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Benjamin W. Harris[10][11]
  Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1883
43rd
44th
45th
46th
47th
Elected in 1872.
Re-elected in 1874.
Re-elected in 1876.
Re-elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Retired.
1873 – 1883
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
John D. Long
  Republican March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1889
48th
49th
50th
Elected in 1882.
Re-elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886.
Retired.
1883 – 1893
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Elijah A. Morse
  Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1893
51st
52nd
Elected in 1888.
Re-elected in 1890.
Redistricted to the 12th district.
 
Frederick H. Gillett[12][13]
  Republican March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1925
53rd
54th
55th
56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
66th
67th
68th
Elected in 1892.
Re-elected in 1894.
Re-elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
1893 – 1903
[Data unknown/missing.]
1903 – 1913
[Data unknown/missing.]
1913 – 1933
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
George B. Churchill
  Republican March 4, 1925 –
July 1, 1925
69th Elected in 1924.
Died.
Vacant July 1, 1925 –
September 29, 1925
 
Henry L. Bowles
  Republican September 29, 1925 –
March 3, 1929
69th
70th
Elected to finish Churchill's term.
Re-elected in 1926.
Retired.
 
Will Kirk Kaynor
  Republican March 4, 1929 –
December 20, 1929
71st Elected in 1928.
Died.
Vacant December 20, 1929 –
February 11, 1930
 
William J. Granfield
  Democratic February 11, 1930 –
January 3, 1937
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
Elected to finish Kaynor's term.
Also elected to full term in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Retired.
1933 – 1943
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Charles R. Clason[14]
  Republican January 3, 1937 –
January 3, 1949
75th
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
Elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Lost re-election.
1943 – 1953
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Foster Furcolo
  Democratic January 3, 1949 –
September 30, 1952
81st
82nd
Elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Retired and then resigned early when appointed State Treasurer.
Vacant September 30, 1952 –
January 3, 1953
 
Edward Boland[15]
  Democratic January 3, 1953 –
January 3, 1989
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
Elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Retired.
1953 – 1963
[Data unknown/missing.]
1963 – 1973
[Data unknown/missing.]
1973 – 1983
[Data unknown/missing.]
1983 – 1993
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Richard Neal[16]
  Democratic January 3, 1989 –
January 3, 2013
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
Elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Redistricted to the 1st district.
1993 – 2003
[Data unknown/missing.]
2003 – 2013
 
 
Jim McGovern
  Democratic January 3, 2013 –
Present
113th
114th
115th
116th
Redistricted from the 3rd district and re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
2013 – Present
 
Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history District location

Recent election resultsEdit

2nd district election in 1988
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Richard Neal 156,262 80.23
Communist Louis R. Godena 38,446 19.74
Write-in 52 0.01
Majority 117,816 60.40
Turnout
Democratic hold
2nd district election in 1990
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Richard Neal (Incumbent) 134,152 67.99 -12.24
Write-in 63,169 32.01 +32.00
Majority 70,983 35.98 -24.42
Turnout 197,321
Democratic hold Swing
2nd district election in 1992
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Richard Neal (Incumbent) 131,215 53.09 -14.90
Republican Anthony W. Ravosa, Jr. 76,795 31.07 +31.07
Independent Thomas R. Sheehan 38,963 15.76 +15.76
Write-in 190 0.07 -31.94
Majority 54,420 22.02 -13.96
Turnout 247,163
Democratic hold Swing
2nd district election in 1994
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Richard Neal (Incumbent) 117,178 58.55 +5.46
Republican John M. Briare 72,732 36.34 +5.27
Natural Law Kate Ross 10,167 5.08 +5.08
Write-in 46 0.02 -0.05
Majority 44,446 22.21 +0.19
Turnout 200,123
Democratic hold Swing
2nd district election in 1996
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Richard Neal (Incumbent) 162,995 71.67 +13.12
Republican Mark Steele 49,885 21.94 -14.40
Independent Scott Andrichak 9,181 4.04 +4.04
Natural Law Richard Kaynor 5,124 2.25 -2.83
Write-in 226 0.10 +0.08
Majority 113,110 49.74 +27.53
Turnout 227,411
Democratic hold Swing
2nd district election in 1998
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Richard Neal (Incumbent) 130,550 98.95 +27.28
Write-in 1,383 1.05 +0.95
Majority 129,167 97.90 +48.16
Turnout 131,933
Democratic hold Swing
2nd district election in 2000
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Richard Neal (Incumbent) 196,670 98.91 -0.04
Write-in 2,176 1.09 +0.04
Majority 194,494 97.81 -0.09
Turnout 253,867
Democratic hold Swing
2nd district election in 2002
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Richard Neal (Incumbent) 153,387 99.13 +0.22
Write-in 1,341 0.87 -0.22
Majority 152,046 98.26 +0.45
Turnout 208,498
Democratic hold Swing
2nd district election in 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Richard Neal (Incumbent) 217,682 98.96 -0.17
Write-in 2,282 1.04 +0.17
Majority 227,183 97.92 -0.34
Turnout 287,871
Democratic hold Swing
2nd district election in 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Richard Neal (Incumbent) 164,939 98.65 -0.31
Write-in 2,254 1.35 +0.31
Majority 162,685 97.30 -0.62
Turnout 214,939
Democratic hold Swing
2nd district election in 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Richard Neal (Incumbent) 234,369 98.47 -0.18
Write-in 3,631 1.53 +0.18
Majority 230,738 96.95 -0.35
Turnout 306,820
Democratic hold Swing
2nd district election in 2010
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Richard Neal (Incumbent) 122,751 57.33 -41.14
Republican Thomas A. Wesley 91,209 42.60 +42.60
Write-in 164 0.08 -1.45
Majority 31,542 14.73 -82.12
Turnout 220,424
Democratic hold Swing
2nd district election in 2012[17][18]
This election followed redistricting.
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim McGovern (Incumbent) 259,257 98.5
Write-in 4,078 1.5
Total votes 263,335 100
Turnout
Democratic hold
2nd district election in 2014[19]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim McGovern (Incumbent) 169,640 98.20
Write-in 3,105 1.80
Total votes 172,745 100
Democratic hold
2nd district election in 2016[20]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim McGovern (Incumbent) 275,487 98.24
Write-in 4,924 1.76
Total votes 280,411 100
Democratic hold
2nd district election in 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim McGovern (incumbent) 191,332 67.2%
Republican Tracy Lovvorn 93,391 32.8%
Independent Paul Grady
Total votes 293,163

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=25&cd=02
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. ^ http://www.sec.state.ma.us/spr/sprcat/catpdf2010/cong2010/CongressionalDistrict_2011State.pdf Access Date March 29, 2012
  4. ^ a b c "United States - Massachusetts - MA - District 02". Our Campaigns. April 14, 2011. Retrieved February 11, 2012.
  5. ^ "State Apportionment; districts of the Commonwealth for the choice of one representative to Congress in each district". Massachusetts Register ... for 1843. Boston: Loring.
  6. ^ a b Ben. Perley Poore (1869). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the First Session of the Forty-First Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  7. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 59th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1905.
  8. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 64th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1916.
  9. ^ "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the Second Session of the Thirty-Seventh Congress. Washington DC: House of Representatives. 1861.
  10. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1878). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 45th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  11. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1882). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 47th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  12. ^ L.A. Coolidge (1897). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-Fifth Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  13. ^ A.J. Halford (1909). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 60th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  14. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 75th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1938.
  15. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 90th Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1968.
  16. ^ "Massachusetts". 1991-1992 Official Congressional Directory: 102nd Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1991.
  17. ^ "Return of Votes for Massachusetts State Elections, November 6, 2013" (PDF). Secretary of State for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. November 23, 2012. Retrieved June 1, 2013.
  18. ^ The totals do not include Blank/Scatterings Ballots although they were reported.
  19. ^ "Massachusetts Secretary of State Election Results 2014" (PDF). Massachusetts Secretary of State. November 4, 2014. Retrieved December 26, 2014.
  20. ^ "Massachusetts Secretary of State General Election Results 2016". Massachusetts Secretary of State. November 8, 2016. Retrieved December 15, 2016.

External linksEdit