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Massachusetts's 7th congressional district

Massachusetts's 7th congressional district is a congressional district located in eastern Massachusetts, including roughly three-fourths of the city of Boston and a few of its northern and southern suburbs. Massachusetts congressional redistricting after the 2010 census changed the borders of the district starting with the elections of 2012, with most of the old 7th district redistricted to the new 5th district.[3] Most of the old 8th district now comprises the new 7th district. The seat is currently held by Ayanna Pressley.

Massachusetts's 7th congressional district
Massachusetts US Congressional District 7 (since 2013).tif
Massachusetts's 7th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Ayanna Pressley
DDorchester
Median income$64,310[1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+34[2]

According to The Boston Globe and the latest census data, approximately 33 percent of the population of the district were born outside of the United States, with approximately 34 percent of the population white, 26 percent African American, and 21 percent Latino.[4]

Contents

Election results from presidential racesEdit

Year Office Result
2000 President Gore 64 - 29%
2004 President Kerry 66 - 33%
2008 President Obama 81.9 - 16.7%
2012 President Obama 82.5 - 15.6%
2016 President Clinton 84.1 - 11.9%

Cities and towns in the districtEdit

  • Boston:
    • Wards 1, 2
    • Ward 3: Precincts 7, 8
    • Ward 4
    • Ward 5: Precincts 1, 2, 2A, 6-10
    • Ward 7: Precinct 10
    • Wards 8-10
    • Ward 11: Precincts 1-8
    • Ward 12
    • Ward 13: Precincts 1, 2, 4-6, 8 and 9
    • Ward 14
    • Ward 15
    • Ward 16: Precincts 1, 3, 4, 6, 8, 11
    • Ward 17
    • Ward 18
    • Ward 19: Precincts 7, 10-13
    • Ward 20: Precinct 3
    • Wards 21 and 22

(the remainder of Boston is in the 8th district)

  • Cambridge:
    • Wards 1, 2, 3, 5, 11
    • Ward 4: Precinct 1
    • Ward 10: Precinct 3

(the remainder of Cambridge is in the 5th district)

(the remainder of Milton is in the 8th district)

Cities and towns in the district prior to 2013Edit

1790s-1830sEdit

1840sEdit

1849: "The whole of Berkshire County; Ashfield, Buckland, Charlemont, Coleraine, Conway, Hawley, Heath, Leyden, Monroe, Rowe, and Shelburne, in Franklin County; Chesterfield, Cummington, Goshen, Middlefield, Norwich, Plainfield, Southampton, Westhampton, Williamsburg, and Worthington, in Hampshire County; and Blandford, Chester, Granville, Montgomery, Russell, and Tolland, in the County of Hampden."[5]

1850s-1880sEdit

An act of the legislature passed April 22, 1852 divided the 7th district of Massachusetts as such: "The towns of Andover, Boxford, Bradford, Danvers, Haverhill, Lawrence, Lynnfield, Methuen, Middleton, Saugus, and Topsfield in the county of Essex; and the city of Charlestown, and the towns of Burlington, Lexington, Malden, Medford, Melrose, Reading, Somerville, South Reading, Stoneham, Waltham, and Woburn, in the county of Middlesex."[6]

1890sEdit

 
Massachusetts's 7th congressional district, 1891

1893: "Essex County: Towns of Lynn, Nahant, and Saugus. Middlesex County: Towns of Everett, Malden, Melrose, Stoneham, and Wakefield. Suffolk County: 4th and 5th wards of the city of Boston, and the towns of Chelsea and Revere."[7]

1910sEdit

1916: In Essex County: Boxford, Lawrence, Lynn, Lynnfield, Middleton, Nahant, North Andover, Peabody, Saugus. In Middlesex County: North Reading.[8][9]

1940sEdit

1941: In Essex County: Lawrence, Lynn (part), Middleton, Nahant, North Andover, Peabody. In Suffolk County: Chelsea, Revere, Winthrop.[10]

1950s-2002Edit

2003-2013Edit

 
The district from 2003 to 2013

In Middlesex County:

In Suffolk County:

List of members representing the districtEdit

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history District location
 
George Leonard
Pro-Administration March 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1791
1st Elected in 1788.
Redistricted to the 6th district.
Bristol County, Dukes County, and Nantucket County
 
Artemas Ward
Pro-Administration March 4, 1791 –
March 3, 1793
2nd Elected in 1790.
Redistricted to the 2nd district.
District discontinued March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1795
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
George Leonard
Federalist March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1797
4th Elected in 1795 on the fourth ballot.
Retired.
"3rd Southern district"
Stephen Bullock Federalist March 4, 1797 –
March 3, 1799
5th Elected in 1797 on the third ballot.
Lost re-election.
Phanuel Bishop Democratic-Republican March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1803
6th
7th
Elected in 1799 on the fourth ballot.
Re-elected in 1800.
Redistricted to the 9th district.
 
Nahum Mitchell
Federalist March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1805
8th Elected in 1802.
Lost re-election.
"Plymouth district"
Joseph Barker Democratic-Republican March 4, 1805 –
March 3, 1809
9th
10th
Elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Retired.
William Baylies Federalist March 4, 1809 –
June 28, 1809
11th Elected in 1808.
Lost election challenge.[a]
Charles Turner Jr. Democratic-Republican June 28, 1809 –
March 3, 1813
11th
12th
Won election challenge.[a]
Re-elected in 1810.
Lost re-election.
William Baylies Federalist March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1815
13th Elected in 1812.
Redistricted to the 8th district.
John W. Hulbert Federalist March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1817
14th Redistricted from the 12th district and re-elected in 1814.
Retired.
"Berkshire district"
Henry Shaw Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1821
15th
16th
Elected in 1816.
Re-elected in 1819 on the second ballot.
Retired.
 
Henry W. Dwight
Federalist March 4, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
17th Elected in 1820.
Redistricted to the 9th district.
Samuel C. Allen Adams-Clay Federalist March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
18th
19th
20th
Redistricted from the 6th district.
Re-elected in 1825.
[Data unknown/missing.]
"Franklin district"
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1829
George Grennell Jr. Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1833
21st
22nd
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 6th district.
 
George N. Briggs
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1837
23rd
24th
25th
26th
27th
Redistricted from the 9th district.
Retired.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Whig March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1843
 
Julius Rockwell
Whig March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1851
28th
29th
30th
31st
[Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
 
John Z. Goodrich
Whig March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
32nd [Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 11th district.
 
Nathaniel P. Banks
Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd
34th
35th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned to become Governor of Massachusetts.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Know Nothing March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
Republican March 4, 1857 –
December 24, 1857
Vacant December 24, 1857 –
January 31, 1858
 
Daniel W. Gooch[12]
Republican January 31, 1858 –
March 3, 1863
35th
36th
37th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 6th district.
 
George S. Boutwell
Republican March 4, 1863 –
March 12, 1869
38th
39th
40th
41st
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned to become U.S. Secretary of Treasury
Vacant March 12, 1869 –
November 2, 1869
 
George M. Brooks
Republican November 2, 1869 –
May 13, 1872
41st
42nd
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned.
Vacant May 13, 1872 –
December 2, 1872
 
Constantine C. Esty
Republican December 2, 1872 –
March 3, 1873
42nd [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Ebenezer R. Hoar
Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
43rd [Data unknown/missing.]
 
John K. Tarbox
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
44th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
Benjamin F. Butler[13]
Republican March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1879
45th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
William A. Russell[14]
Republican March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1883
46th
47th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 8th district.
 
Eben F. Stone
Republican March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1887
48th
49th
Redistricted from the 6th district.
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
William Cogswell
Republican March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1893
50th
51st
52nd
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 6th district.
Vacant March 4, 1893 –
April 25, 1893
53rd Member Henry Cabot Lodge had been redistricted from the 6th district and re-elected, but resigned to become a U.S. Senator.
 
William Everett
Democratic April 25, 1893 –
March 3, 1895
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
William Emerson Barrett[15]
Republican March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1899
54th
55th
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Ernest W. Roberts[16]
Republican March 4, 1899 –
March 3, 1913
56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 9th district.
 
Michael Francis Phelan
Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1921
63rd
64th
65th
66th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
 
Robert S. Maloney
Republican March 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1923
67th [Data unknown/missing.]
 
William P. Connery Jr.
Democratic March 4, 1923 –
June 15, 1937
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant June 16, 1937 –
September 27, 1937
 
Lawrence J. Connery[17]
Democratic September 28, 1937 –
October 19, 1941
75th
76th
77th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant October 20, 1941 –
December 29, 1941
 
Thomas J. Lane
Democratic December 30, 1941 –
January 3, 1963
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Torbert H. Macdonald[18]
Democratic January 3, 1963 –
May 21, 1976
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
Redistricted from the 8th district.
Died.
Vacant May 22, 1976 –
November 1, 1976
 
Ed Markey[19]
Democratic November 2, 1976 –
January 3, 2013
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
Elected to finish Macdonald's term.
Redistricted to the 5th district.
 
Michael Capuano
Democratic January 3, 2013 –
January 3, 2019
113th
114th
115th
Redistricted from the 8th district.
Lost renomination.
 
Ayanna Pressley
Democratic January 3, 2019 –
Present
116th Elected in 2018.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b In the 1808 election, there were 430 votes for "Charles Turner," which were counted separately from Charles Turner Jr. (Democratic-Republican). This caused the vote tally to be William Baylies (Federalist) 1,828 (49.4%), Charles Turner Jr. (Democratic-Republican) 1,443 (39.0%), "Charles Turner" 430 (11.6%).[citation needed] As no candidate had a majority, a second election was held on January 19, 1809 which elected Baylies with 54.3% of the vote.Turner successfully contested this election and was subsequently declared the winner based on the first ballot, with the second invalidated. He was seated June 8, 1809[11]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=25&cd=07
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. ^ http://www.sec.state.ma.us/spr/sprcat/catpdf2010/cong2010/CongressionalDistrict_2011State.pdf Access date: March 21, 2012.
  4. ^ Krantz, Laura (July 17, 2019). "Ayanna Pressley wants to get back to the issues, although ignoring the president isn't easy". The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on July 18, 2019. Retrieved July 18, 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  5. ^ John Hayward (1849). "Congressional Districts". Gazetteer of Massachusetts. Boston: J.P. Jewett & Co.
  6. ^ "Congressional Districts". Massachusetts Register (1st ed.). Boston, MA: Sampson Adams & Co. 1862.
  7. ^ Francis M. Cox (1893). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-Third Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  8. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 64th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1916.
  9. ^ Commonwealth of Massachusetts (1921), "Population of Congressional Districts", Population of Massachusetts as determined by the fourteenth census of the United States 1920, Boston: Wright & Potter
  10. ^ Commonwealth of Massachusetts (1941), "Population of Congressional Districts", Population of Massachusetts as determined by the sixteenth census of the United States, 1940, Boston: Wright & Potter, OCLC 10056477, House No. 2849
  11. ^ "Eleventh Congress (membership roster)" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on December 13, 2012. Retrieved December 13, 2012. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  12. ^ "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the Second Session of the Thirty-Seventh Congress. Washington DC: House of Representatives. 1861.
  13. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1878). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 45th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  14. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1882). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 47th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  15. ^ L.A. Coolidge (1897). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-Fifth Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  16. ^ A.J. Halford (1909). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 60th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  17. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 75th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1938.
  18. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 90th Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1968.
  19. ^ "Massachusetts". 1991-1992 Official Congressional Directory: 102nd Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1991.

External linksEdit

MapsEdit

Election resultsEdit

Coordinates: 42°19′00″N 71°00′34″W / 42.31667°N 71.00944°W / 42.31667; -71.00944