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Massachusetts's 1st congressional district

Massachusetts's 1st congressional district is located in western and central Massachusetts. The largest Massachusetts district in area, it covers about one-third of the state and is more rural than the rest. It has the state's highest point, Mount Greylock. The district includes the cities of Springfield, West Springfield, Pittsfield, Holyoke, and Westfield.

Massachusetts's 1st congressional district
Massachusetts US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
Massachusetts's 1st congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Richard Neal
DSpringfield
Area3,101.14 sq mi (8,031.9 km2)
Distribution
  • 69.21% urban
  • 30.79% rural
Population (2000)634,479
Median income$55,465[1]
Ethnicity
Occupation
Cook PVID+12[2]

The shape of the district underwent some changes effective from the elections of 2012, after Massachusetts congressional redistricting to reflect the 2010 census.[3] The entire Springfield area is included in the new 1st district, and the Worcester County areas of the old 1st district were split between the new 2nd and 3rd districts.

Richard Neal, a Democrat from Springfield, represents the district.

Cities and towns currently in the districtEdit

Recent election results in statewide racesEdit

Year Office Result
2000 President Gore 63 - 35%
2004 President Kerry 63 - 35%
2008 President Obama 64 - 34%
2012 President Obama 64 - 34%
2016 President Clinton 57 - 37%

List of members representing the districtEdit

Member Party Years ↑ Cong
ress
Electoral history District location
 
Fisher Ames
Pro-Administration March 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1793
1st
2nd
Elected in 1788.
Re-elected in 1790.
1789–1793
Suffolk County
General ticket:
Four members
from the
same district
March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1795
3rd Re-elected in 1792 with three others on a general ticket representing the district from Suffolk County.
Redistricted to the 8th district.
1793–1795
Suffolk County, Middlesex County, and Essex County
 
Samuel Dexter
Pro-Administration Elected in 1792 with three others on a general ticket representing the district from Middlesex County.
Redistricted to the 9th district and lost re-election.
 
Benjamin Goodhue
Pro-Administration Redistricted from the 2nd district and re-elected in 1792 with three others on a general ticket representing the district from Essex County.
Redistricted to the 10th district.
 
Samuel Holten
Anti-Administration Elected in 1792 with three others on a general ticket representing the district at-large.
Redistricted to the 10th district and lost re-election.
 
Theodore Sedgwick
Federalist March 4, 1795 –
June 11, 1796
4th Redistricted from the 2nd district and re-elected in 1794.
Resigned to become U.S. Senator.
1795–1803
"1st Western district"
Vacant June 1796 –
January 27, 1797
 
Thomson J. Skinner
Democratic-Republican January 27, 1797 –
March 3, 1799
Elected to finish Sedgwick's term.
Re-elected in 1796.
Retired.
5th
 
Theodore Sedgwick
Federalist March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1801
6th Elected in 1798.
Retired.
John Bacon Democratic-Republican March 4, 1801 –
March 3, 1803
7th Elected in 1800.
Retired.
 
William Eustis
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1805
8th Redistricted from the 8th district and re-elected in 1802.
Lost re-election.
1803–1813
"Suffolk district"
 
Josiah Quincy III
Federalist March 4, 1805 –
March 3, 1813
9th
10th
11th
12th
Elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Retired.
Artemas Ward Jr. Federalist March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1817
13th
14th
Elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
Retired.
1813–1823
"Suffolk district"
 
Jonathan Mason
Federalist March 4, 1817 –
May 15, 1820
15th
16th
Elected August 26, 1817 to Representative-elect James Lloyd's term and seated December 2, 1816.[4]
Re-elected in 1818.
Resigned to pursue law practice.
Vacant May 15, 1820 –
November 6, 1820
16th
Benjamin Gorham Democratic-Republican November 6, 1820 –
March 3, 1823
16th
17th
Elected to finish Mason's term.
Also elected to the next term in 1820.
Retired.
 
Daniel Webster
Adams-Clay Federalist March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
18th
19th
20th
Elected in 1822.
Re-elected in 1824.
Re-elected in 1826, but resigned to become U.S. Senator.
1823–1833
"Suffolk district"
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
May 30, 1827
Vacant May 30, 1827 –
July 23, 1827
20th
Benjamin Gorham Anti-Jacksonian July 23, 1827 –
March 3, 1831
20th
21st
Elected to finish Webster's term.
Re-elected in 1828.
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Nathan Appleton
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1833
22nd Elected in 1830.
Retired.
Benjamin Gorham Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1835
23rd Elected in 1833.
[Data unknown/missing.]
1833–1843
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Abbott Lawrence
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
24th Elected in 1834.
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Richard Fletcher
Whig March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
25th Elected in 1836.
Retired.
 
Abbott Lawrence
Whig March 4, 1839 –
September 18, 1840
26th Elected in 1838.
Resigned.
Vacant September 18, 1840 –
November 9, 1840
26th
 
Robert C. Winthrop
Whig November 9, 1840 –
May 25, 1842
26th
27th
Elected to finish Lawrence's term.
Also elected to the next term in 1840.
Resigned.
Vacant May 25, 1842 –
June 9, 1842
27th
 
Nathan Appleton
Whig June 9, 1842 –
September 28, 1842
27th Elected to finish Winthrop's term.
Resigned.
Vacant September 28, 1842 –
November 29, 1842
27th
 
Robert C. Winthrop
Whig November 29, 1842 –
July 30, 1850
27th
28th
29th
30th
31st
Elected to finish Appleton's term.
Also elected to the next term in 1842.
Re-elected in 1844.
Re-elected in 1846.
Re-elected in 1848.
Resigned to become U.S. Senator.
1843–1853
"City of Boston."[5]
Vacant July 30, 1850 –
August 22, 1850
31st
 
Samuel A. Eliot
Whig August 22, 1850 –
March 3, 1851
31st Elected to finish Winthrop's term.
Retired.
 
William Appleton
Whig March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
32nd Elected in 1850.
Redistricted to the 5th district.
 
Zeno Scudder
Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1854
33rd Redistricted from the 10th district and re-elected in 1852.
Retired because of injury.
1853–1863
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vacant March 4, 1854 –
April 17, 1854
 
Thomas D. Eliot
Whig April 17, 1854 –
March 3, 1855
Elected to finish Scudder's term.
Retired.
 
Robert B. Hall
American
(Know Nothing)
March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th
35th
Elected in 1854.
Re-elected in 1856.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
 
Thomas D. Eliot
Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1869
36th
37th
38th
39th
40th[6]
Elected in 1858.
Re-elected in 1860.
Re-elected in 1862.
Re-elected in 1864.
Re-elected in 1866.
Retired.
1863–1873
"All of Barnstable, Dukes and Nantucket counties; the city of New Bedford and towns of Dartmouth and Fairhaven, in Bristol county; the towns of Carver, Kingston, Plymouth, Plympton, Rochester, and Wareham, in Plymouth county."[7]
 
James Buffinton
Republican March 4, 1869 –
March 7, 1875
41st
42nd
43rd
44th[8]
Elected in 1868.
Re-elected in 1870.
Re-elected in 1872.
Re-elected in 1874.
Died.
1873–1883
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vacant March 7, 1875 –
November 2, 1875
44th
 
William W. Crapo
Republican November 2, 1875 –
March 3, 1883
44th
45th
46th
47th[9][10]
Elected to finish Buffinton's term.
Re-elected in 1876.
Re-elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Retired.
 
Robert T. Davis
Republican March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1889
48th
49th
50th
Elected in 1882.
Re-elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886.
Retired.
1883–1893
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Charles S. Randall
Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1893
51st
52nd
Elected in 1888.
Re-elected in 1890.
Redistricted to the 13th district.
 
Ashley B. Wright
Republican March 4, 1893 –
August 14, 1897
53rd
54th
55th[11]
Elected in 1892.
Re-elected in 1894.
Re-elected in 1896.
Died.
1893–1903
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vacant August 14, 1897 –
November 2, 1897
55th
 
George P. Lawrence
Republican November 2, 1897 –
March 3, 1913
55th
56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd[12][13]
Elected to finish Wright's term.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Retired.
1903–1913
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
Allen T. Treadway
Republican March 4, 1913 –
January 3, 1945
63rd
64th
65th
66th
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th[14]
Elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Retired.
1913–1933
"Berkshire County. Franklin County: Towns of Ashfleld, Buckland, Charlemont, Colrain, Conway, Greenfield, Hawley, Heath, Leyden, Monroe, Rowe, and Shelburne. Hampshire County: Towns of Chesterfield, Cummington, Goshen, Huntington, Middlefield, Plainfield, Southampton, Westhampton and Worthington. Hampden County: City of Holyoke and towns of Blandford, Chester, Granville, Montgomery, Russell, Southwick, Tolland, and Westfield."[15]
1933–1943
[Data unknown/missing.]
1943–1953
[Data unknown/missing.]
 
John W. Heselton
Republican January 3, 1945 –
January 3, 1959
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
Elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Retired.
1953–1963
"Counties: Berkshire and Franklin. Hamdpen County: Cities of Holyoke and Westfield; towns of Blandford, Chester, Granville, Montgomery, Russell, Southwick, and Tolland. Hampshire County: Towns of Belchertown, Chesterfield, Cummington, Goshen, Huntington,

Middlefield, Pelham, Plainfield, Southampton, Westhampton, Williamsburg, and Worthington. Worcester County: Towns of Athol, Petersham, Phillipston, Royalston, and Templeton."[16]

 
Silvio O. Conte
Republican January 3, 1959 –
February 8, 1991
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
Elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Died.
1963–1973
"Berkshire County: Cities of North Adams and Pittsfield. Towns of Adams, Alford, Becket, Cheshire, Clarksburg, Dalton, Egremont, Florida, Great Barrington, Hancock, Hinsdale, Lanesborough, Lee, Lenox, Monterey, Mount Washington, New Ashford, New Marlborough, Otis, Peru, Richmond, Sandisfield, Savoy, Sheffield, Stockbridge, Tyringham, Washington, West Stockbridge, Williamstown, and Windsor. Franklin County: Towns of Ashfield, Bernardston, Buckland, Charlemont, Colrain, Conway, Deerfield, Erving, Gill, Greenfield, Hawley, Heath, Leverett, Leyden, Monroe, Montague, New Salem, Northfield, Orange, Rowe, Shelburne, Shutesbury, Sunderland, Warwick, Wendell, and Whately. Hampden County: Cities of Holyoke and Westfield. Towns of Blandford, Chester, Granville, Montgomery, Russell, Southwick, and Tolland. Hampshire County: City of Northampton. Towns of Amherst, Chesterfield, Cummington, Easthampton, Goshen, Hadley, Hatfield, Huntington, Middlefield, Pelham, Plainfield, Southampton, Westhampton, Williamsburg, and Worthington. Worcester County: Towns of Athol, Petersham, Phillipston, Royalston, and Templeton."[17][a]
1973–1983
"Berkshire County: All cities and towns. Franklin County: All towns except Orange. Hampden County: Cities of Holyoke and Westfleld. Towns of Agawam, Blandford, Chester, Granville, Montgomery, Russell, Southwick, Tolland, West Springfield. Hampshire County: City of Northampton. All towns."[19]
1983–1993
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vacant February 8, 1991 –
June 18, 1991
102nd
 
John Olver
Democratic June 18, 1991 –
January 3, 2013
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
Elected in 1991 to finish Conte's term.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Retired.[20]
1993–2003
[Data unknown/missing.]
2003–2013
 

All of Berkshire County and Franklin County as well the following towns and cities:

In Hampden County: Blandford, Chester, Granville, Holyoke, Montgomery, Russell, Southwick, Tolland, Westfield, West Springfield.

In Hampshire County: Amherst, Belchertown, Chesterfield, Cummington, Easthampton, Goshen, Granby, Hatfield, Huntington, Middlefield, Pelham, Plainfield, Southampton, Ware, Westhampton, Williamsburg, Worthington.

In Middlesex County: Ashby, Pepperell, Townsend.

In Worcester County: Ashburnham, Athol, Barre, Fitchburg, Gardner, Hardwick, Hubbardston, Leominster, Lunenburg, New Braintree, Oakham, Petersham, Phillipston, Royalston, Sterling, Templeton, West Brookfield, Westminster, Winchendon.

 
Richard Neal
Democratic January 3, 2013 –
present
113th
114th
115th
116th
Redistricted from the 2nd district and re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
2013–present
 
All of Berkshire County, all of Hampden County (except for Precinct 1A in Palmer), and the following towns and cities:

In Franklin County: Ashfield, Bernardston, Buckland, Charlemont, Colrain, Conway, Hawley, Heath, Leyden, Monroe, Rowe, and Shelburne.

In Hampshire County: Chesterfield, Cummington, Easthampton, Goshen, Granby, Huntington, Middlefield, Plainfield, South Hadley, Southampton, Westhampton, Williamsburg, and Worthington.

In Worcester County: Brookfield, Charlton, Dudley, East Brookfield, Southbridge, Sturbridge, and Warren.

Recent election resultsEdit

2002 general election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Olver 137,841 67.56
Republican Matthew Kinnaman 66,061 32.40
Write-in 117 0.06
Majority 71,780 35.18
Turnout 204,019
Democratic hold
2004 general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic John Olver 229,465 99.02 + 31.46
Write-in 2,282 0.98 + 0.92
Majority 227,183 98.04 + 62.86
Turnout 231,747
Democratic hold Swing
2006 general election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Olver 158,035 76%
Unenrolled challenger William H. Szych 49,123 24%
Socialist Eric Chester <253 <1%
Democratic hold
2008 general election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Olver 215,696 69.7%
Republican Nathan Bech 8,067 25.9%
Democratic hold
2010 general election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Olver 128,011 60%
Republican William L. Gunn, Jr. 74,418 34.9%
Independent Michael Engel 10,880 5.1%
Democratic hold

Living former Members of the HouseEdit

As of January 2019, there is one living former member of the House. The most recent representative to die was Silvio O. Conte (served 1959–1991), who died in office on February 8, 1991.

U.S. Representative Years in office Date of birth (and age)
John Olver 1991–2013 (1936-09-03) September 3, 1936 (age 83)

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ One source has a different list for the second session of the 88th Congress, which met in 1972: "Berkshire County: All cities and towns. Franklin County: All towns. Hampden County: Cities of Holyoke and Westfield. Towns of Agawam, Blandford, Chester, Granville, Montgomery, Russell, Southwick, Tolland, and West Springfield. Hampshire County: City of Northampton. Towns of Amherst, Chesterfield, Cummington, Easthampton, Goshen, Hadley, Hatfield, Huntington, Middlefield, Pelham, Plainfleld, Southampton, Westhampton, Williamsburg, and Worthington. Worcester County: Towns of Athol, Barre, Hardwick, Hubbardston, New Braintree, Oakham, Petersham, Phillipston, Royalston. Rutland, and Templeton."[18]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "My Congressional District / Massachusetts / District 1". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 15, 2019 – via Census.gov.
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index –
    Districts of the 115th Congress"
    (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. ^ "The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 2011 Congressional Districts (Chapter 177 of the Acts of 2001" (PDF). Retrieved March 29, 2012.
  4. ^ "Fourteenth Congress March 4, 1815 to March 3, 1817". Office of the Historian, United States House of Representatives. Retrieved January 11, 2019 – via History.house.gov.
  5. ^ John Hayward (1849). "Congressional Districts". Gazetteer of Massachusetts. Boston: J.P. Jewett & Co.
  6. ^ "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the Second Session of the Thirty-Seventh Congress. Washington, D.C.: Postmaster of the United States House of Representatives. 1861.
  7. ^ "Congressional Districts". Massachusetts Register 1862. Boston: Adams, Sampson, & Co.
  8. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1869). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the First Session of the Forty-First Congress (2nd ed.). Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office.
  9. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1878). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 45th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office.
  10. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1882). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 47th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office.
  11. ^ L.A. Coolidge (1897). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-Fifth Congress. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office.
  12. ^ A.J. Halford (1903). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-Eighth Congress. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office.
  13. ^ A.J. Halford (1909). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 60th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office.
  14. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 75th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. 1938.
  15. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 64th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. 1916.
  16. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 83rd Congress. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. 1953.
  17. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 88th Congress. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. 1963.
  18. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 92nd Congress. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. 1972.
  19. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 93rd Congress. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. 1973.
  20. ^ "U.S. Rep. John Olver announces plan to retire when term ends next year". masslive.com. Retrieved April 5, 2018.

Further readingEdit

  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.

External linksEdit