Missouri's 7th congressional district

Missouri's 7th congressional district consists of Southwest Missouri. The district includes Springfield, the home of Missouri State University, and the popular tourist destination city of Branson. Located along the borders of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Northwest Arkansas, the district occupies part of the Bible Belt with a strong socially conservative trend. George W. Bush defeated John Kerry here 67% to 32% in the 2004 election. Republican John McCain defeated Democrat Barack Obama 63.1% to 35.3% in the 2008 election. Republican and Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney defeated Barack Obama 67.6% to 30.3% in the 2012 election. In the 2020 election, Republican Donald Trump defeated Democrat Joe Biden 79.91% to 18.93%. As of 2020, this district is the second most strongly Republican district in Missouri and is one of the most strongly Republican districts in the United States.

Missouri's 7th congressional district
Missouri US Congressional District 7 (since 2013).tif
Missouri's 7th congressional district since January 3, 2013
Representative
  Billy Long
RSpringfield
Distribution
  • 59.28% urban
  • 40.72% rural
Population (2019)787,917
Median household
income
$47,679[1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+24[2]

The district is currently represented by Republican Billy Long of Springfield. He survived primary challenges on August 7, 2020. He defeated Democrat Teresa Montseny in the general election in November.[3]

Election results from presidential racesEdit

Year Office Results
2000 President George W. Bush 62 - Al Gore 36%
2004 President George W. Bush 67 - John Kerry 32%
2008 President John McCain 62 - Barack Obama 35%
2012 President Mitt Romney 68 - Barack Obama 30%
2016 President Donald Trump 70 - Hillary Clinton 25%
2020 President Donald Trump 70 - Joe Biden 28%

List of members representing the districtEdit

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history
District created March 4, 1853
Samuel Caruthers Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd
34th
35th
Elected in 1852.
Re-elected in 1854.
Re-elected in 1856.
Retired.
Opposition March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
Democratic March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
John W. Noell Democratic March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1863
36th
37th
Elected in 1858.
Re-elected in 1860.
Redistricted to the 3rd district.
 
Benjamin F. Loan
Unconditional Unionist March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1865
38th
39th
40th
Elected in 1862.
Re-elected in 1864.
Re-elected in 1866.
Lost re-election.
Republican March 4, 1865 –
March 3, 1869
 
Joel F. Asper
Republican March 4, 1869 –
March 3, 1871
41st Elected in 1868.
Retired.
 
Isaac Parker
Republican March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1873
42nd Elected in 1870.
Redistricted to the 9th district.
 
Thomas T. Crittenden
Democratic March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
43rd Elected in 1872.
Retired.
 
John F. Philips
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
44th Elected in 1874.
Lost re-election.
 
Thomas T. Crittenden
Democratic March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1879
45th Elected in 1876.
Retired.
Alfred M. Lay Democratic March 4, 1879 –
December 8, 1879
46th Elected in 1878.
Died.
Vacant December 8, 1879 –
January 26, 1880
 
John F. Philips
Democratic January 26, 1880 –
March 3, 1881
Elected to finish Lay's term.
Lost re-election.
 
Theron M. Rice
Greenback March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1883
47th Elected in 1880.
Retired.
 
Aylett H. Buckner
Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1885
48th Redistricted from the 13th district and re-elected in 1882.
Retired.
John E. Hutton Democratic March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1889
49th
50th
Elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886.
Retired.
 
Richard H. Norton
Democratic March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1893
51st
52nd
Elected in 1888.
Re-elected in 1890.
Lost re-election.
 
John T. Heard
Democratic March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1895
53rd Redistricted from the 6th district and re-elected in 1892.
Lost re-election.
 
John P. Tracey
Republican March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1897
54th Elected in 1894.
Lost re-election.
 
James Cooney
Democratic March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1903
55th
56th
57th
Elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Lost renomination.
 
Courtney W. Hamlin
Democratic March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1905
58th Elected in 1902.
Lost re-election.
 
John Welborn
Republican March 4, 1905 –
March 3, 1907
59th Elected in 1904.
Lost re-election.
 
Courtney W. Hamlin
Democratic March 4, 1907 –
March 3, 1919
60th
61st
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
Elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Lost renomination.
 
Samuel C. Major
Democratic March 4, 1919 –
March 3, 1921
66th Elected in 1918.
Lost re-election.
 
Roscoe C. Patterson
Republican March 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1923
67th Elected in 1920.
Lost re-election.
 
Samuel C. Major
Democratic March 4, 1923 –
March 3, 1929
68th
69th
70th
Elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Lost re-election.
 
John W. Palmer
Republican March 4, 1929 –
March 3, 1931
71st Elected in 1928.
Lost re-election.
 
Samuel C. Major
Democratic March 4, 1931 –
July 28, 1931
72nd Elected in 1930.
Died.
Vacant July 28, 1931 –
September 29, 1931
 
Robert D. Johnson
Democratic September 29, 1931 –
March 3, 1933
Elected to finish Major's term.
Redistricted to at-large and lost renomination.
District inactive March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1935
73rd All representatives elected at-large on a general ticket
 
Dewey Short
Republican January 3, 1935 –
January 3, 1957
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
Elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Lost re-election.
 
Charles H. Brown
Democratic January 3, 1957 –
January 3, 1961
85th
86th
Elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Lost re-election.
 
Durward G. Hall
Republican January 3, 1961 –
January 3, 1973
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
Elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Retired.
 
Gene Taylor
Republican January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 1989
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
Elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Retired.
 
Mel Hancock
Republican January 3, 1989 –
January 3, 1997
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
Elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Retired.
 
Roy Blunt
Republican January 3, 1997 –
January 3, 2011
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
Elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
 
Billy Long
Republican January 3, 2011 –
present
112th
113th
114th
115th
116th
117th
Elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.
Retiring to run for U.S. senator.

CountiesEdit

 
The district from 2003 - 2013

There are a total of 10 counties included in MO-07.

Largest citiesEdit

The 10 largest cities in MO-07 are as follows.

Rank City County Population (2010) Population (2015 Estimates)
1 Springfield Greene/Christian 159,498 166,810
2 Joplin Jasper/Newton 50,150 51,818
3 Nixa Christian 19,022 20,984
4 Ozark Christian 17,820 19,120
5 Republic Christian/Greene 14,751 16,005
6 Carthage Jasper 14,378 14,319
7 Neosho Newton 11,835 12,156
8 Branson Taney/Stone 10,520 11,431
9 Webb City Jasper 10,996 11,165
10 Bolivar Polk 10,325 10,714

Median household incomesEdit

Rank County Income (2008)
1 Christian $50,200
2 Greene $44,185
3 Newton $43,872
4 Stone $40,487
5 Jasper $40,243
6 Taney $39,771
7 Lawrence $39,210
8 Polk $37,199
9 Barry $35,889
10 McDonald $33,448

Median family incomesEdit

Rank County Income (2008)
1 Christian $58,806
2 Greene $56,047
3 Newton $51,178
4 Jasper $49,007
5 Taney $47,664
6 Stone $46,675
7 Lawrence $45,843
8 Polk $45,263
9 Barry $41,861
10 McDonald $38,848

Election resultsEdit

CongressionalEdit

United States House of Representatives elections, 1998 Missouri 7th[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Roy Blunt (incumbent) 129,746 72.6%
Democratic Marc Perkel 43,146 24.3%
Libertarian Mike Harman 5,639 3.2%
Total votes 178,801 100%
Majority 80,691 45.1%
Turnout
Republican hold Swing
United States House of Representatives elections, 2002 Missouri 7th[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Roy Blunt (incumbent) 149,519 74.81%
Democratic Roland Roy Lapham 45,964 23.00%
Libertarian Douglas Andrew Burlison 4,378 2.19%
Other Steven L. Reed 2 0.00%
Total votes 199,863 100%
Majority
Turnout
Republican hold Swing
United States House of Representatives elections, 2004 Missouri 7th[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Roy Blunt (incumbent) 210,080 70.45%
Democratic Jim Newberry 84,356 28.29%
Libertarian James K. Craig 2,767 0.93%
Constitution Steve Alger 1,002 0.34%
Total votes 298,205 100%
Majority
Turnout
Republican hold Swing
United States House of Representatives elections, 2006 Missouri 7th[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Roy Blunt (incumbent) 160,942 66.75%
Democratic Jack Truman 75,592 30.11%
Libertarian Kevin Craig 7,566 3.14%
Other Glenn Miller 23 0.01%
Total votes 241,123 100%
Majority
Turnout
Republican hold Swing
United States House of Representatives elections, 2008 Missouri 7th[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Roy Blunt (incumbent) 219,016 67.76%
Democratic Richard Monroe 91,010 28.16%
Libertarian Kevin Craig 6,971 2.16%
Constitution Travis Maddox 6,166 1.91%
Other Midge Potts 49 0.02%
Total votes 323,212 100%
Majority
Turnout
Republican hold Swing
United States House of Representatives elections, 2010 Missouri 7th[9]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Billy Long 141,010 63.39
Democratic Scott Eckersley 67,545 30.37
Libertarian Kevin Craig 13,866 6.23
Write-In Nicholas Ladendorf 10 0.00
Total votes 222,431 100.00
Majority
Turnout
Republican hold Swing
United States House of Representatives elections, 2012 Missouri 7th[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Billy Long (incumbent) 203,565 63.9
Democratic Jim Evans 98,498 30.9
Libertarian Kevin Craig 16,668 5.2
Write-in Kenneth Joe Brown 9 0.0
Total votes 318,740 100.0
Majority
Turnout
Republican hold Swing
United States House of Representatives elections, 2014 Missouri 7th[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Billy Long (incumbent) 104,054 63.46
Democratic Jim Evans 47,282 28.84
Libertarian Kevin Craig 12,584 7.68
Write-Ins 37 0.02
Total votes 163,957 100
Majority
Turnout
Republican hold Swing
United States House of Representatives elections, 2016 Missouri 7th[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Billy Long (incumbent) 228,001 67.56
Democratic Genevieve Williams 92,390 27.38
Libertarian Benjamin T. Brixey 17,076 5.06
Write-in Amber Thomsen 23 0.00
Total votes 337,490 100
Majority
Turnout
Republican hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 2018 Missouri 7th
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Billy Long (incumbent) 196,343 66.2
Democratic Jamie Schoolcraft 89,190 30.1
Libertarian Ben Brixey 10,920 3.7
Independent Shawn Deines (write-in) 2 0.0
Total votes 296,455 100.0
Republican hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 2020 Missouri 7th
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Billy Long (incumbent) 254,318 68.9
Democratic Teresa Montseny 98,111 26.6
Libertarian Kevin Craig 15,573 4.2
Independent Audrey Richards (write-in) 1,279 0.3
Write-in 2 0.0
Total votes 454,339 100.0
Republican hold


PresidentialEdit

2008

The table below shows how individual counties in MO-07 voted in the 2008 presidential election. U.S. Senator John McCain (R-Arizona) swept the district with 63.07 percent of the vote while U.S. Senator Barack Obama (D-Illinois) received 35.39 percent, a 27.68-percent margin of victory for the GOP. McCain received less than 60 percent in only Greene County, where Obama may have been helped by the college subplot presence of Missouri State University.

County John McCain Barack Obama Difference
Newton 69.42 29.32 R + 40.10
McDonald 67.60 30.17 R + 37.43
Stone 68.02 30.69 R + 37.33
Taney 68.02 30.85 R + 37.17
Lawrence 67.70 30.64 R + 37.06
Christian 67.33 31.52 R + 35.81
Barry 66.63 31.62 R + 35.01
Jasper 65.67 32.62 R + 33.05
Polk 65.39 33.24 R + 32.15
Greene 57.06 41.26 R + 15.08

PrimariesEdit

2008

Republican The table below shows how individual counties in MO-07 voted in the 2008 Missouri Republican Presidential Primary. Former Governor Mike Huckabee (R-Arkansas) carried every county in MO-07 over U.S. Senator John McCain (R-Arizona) and former Governor Mitt Romney (R-Massachusetts).

County Mike Huckabee John McCain Mitt Romney Difference
Taney 55.89 25.90 14.17 H + 29.99
Polk 51.33 25.28 18.65 H + 26.05
Christian 48.46 24.37 22.75 H + 24.09
McDonald 48.71 25.55 14.75 H + 23.16
Lawrence 48.75 26.19 18.96 H + 22.56
Barry 49.69 28.31 15.33 H + 21.38
Newton 45.49 25.95 22.82 H + 19.54
Jasper 42.23 25.82 26.03 H + 16.20
Greene 42.48 27.09 25.17 H + 15.39
Stone 45.01 31.82 18.80 H + 13.19

Democratic

The table below shows how individual counties in MO-07 voted in the 2008 Missouri Democratic Presidential Primary. Former U.S. Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-New York) carried every county in the district by convincing margins over U.S. Senator Barack Obama (D-Illinois).

County Hillary Clinton Barack Obama Difference
McDonald 68.39 26.00 C + 42.39
Barry 65.52 30.47 C + 35.05
Newton 65.55 31.46 C + 34.09
Polk 63.81 33.28 C + 30.53
Taney 63.69 33.74 C + 29.95
Lawrence 61.58 34.86 C + 26.72
Stone 61.76 35.17 C + 26.59
Jasper 60.42 36.39 C + 24.03
Christian 57.68 39.93 C + 17.75
Greene 54.94 42.77 C + 12.17

GubernatorialEdit

2008

The table below shows how individual counties in MO-07 voted in the 2008 Missouri gubernatorial election. Former Attorney General and now Governor Jay Nixon (D) lost the district to his challenger, former U.S. Representative Kenny Hulshof (R).

County Kenny Hulshof Jay Nixon Difference
Newton 61.85 36.29 R + 25.56
McDonald 59.74 36.63 R + 23.11
Jasper 58.61 39.42 R + 19.19
Jasper 58.61 39.42 R + 19.19
Taney 51.16 46.31 R + 4.85
Stone 49.53 47.46 R + 2.07
Christian 49.65 47.73 R + 1.92
Barry 49.48 47.90 R + 1.58
Lawrence 49.15 47.94 R + 1.21
Polk 45.76 49.52 D + 3.76
Greene 42.84 54.45 D + 11.61

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "My Congressional District".
  2. ^ "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  3. ^ "Election 2020: Billy Long keeps seat in U.S. Congress representing southwest Missouri". www.msn.com. Retrieved November 4, 2020.
  4. ^ "1998 Election Results". Archived from the original on May 16, 2011. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  5. ^ Official Manual of Missouri, 2003-2004, page 627.
  6. ^ Official Manual of Missouri, 2005-2006, page 637
  7. ^ Official Manual of Missouri, 2007-2008, page 649
  8. ^ "2008 Election Results". Archived from the original on October 30, 2014. Retrieved October 26, 2009.
  9. ^ [1] 2010 Election Results
  10. ^ [2] 2012 Election Results
  11. ^ [3] 2014 Election Results
  12. ^ [4] 2016 Election Results