Maryland's 2nd congressional district

Maryland's 2nd congressional district elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives every two years. The district comprises parts of Howard, Harford, Baltimore, and Anne Arundel Counties, as well as small portions of the City of Baltimore. The seat has been represented by Dutch Ruppersberger of the Democratic Party since 2003.

Maryland's 2nd congressional district
Maryland US Congressional District 2 (since 2013).tif
Maryland's 2nd congressional district since January 3, 2013
Representative
  Dutch Ruppersberger
DCockeysville
Area359 sq mi (930 km2)
Distribution
  • 98.3% urban
  • 1.7% rural
Population (2019)750,702
Median household
income
$73,004[1]
Ethnicity
Occupation
Cook PVID+13[2]

Historical boundariesEdit

When it was first organized in the late 1780s, the Maryland 2nd congressional district consisted of the northern portion of the eastern shore of Maryland and the area where the Susquehanna River empties into the Chesapeake Bay. It had a population of 55,008 in 1790.[3]

After the 1790 census, Maryland gained two seats in the house. The new 2nd district essentially consisted of Howard County, Prince George's County and Anne Arundel County. The boundary ran on a line heading north-east from the north-west corner of the District of Columbia so that a small portion of Montgomery County was also in the 2nd district.[4]

This remained the boundaries of the district until the post–1830 census redistricting. At this time the 2nd district was moved back to the eastern shore region where it had been at first. The only change between the district's boundaries in 1790 and those in 1834 was that in the latter year Caroline County was part of the 2nd district.[5]

In the 1842 redistricting, which involved a decrease in the total number of representatives, Maryland went back to having only six members of the house. The second district was moved again and now composed the Maryland Panhandle, that is all of Maryland starting with Frederick County and going west.[6]

The post-1850 census redistricting caused another drastic redrawing of Maryland's congressional districts. The second district was moved back to the East side of the state. However this time it only had the eastern shore as far south as Kent County. However going westward it had Harford County, northern and western Baltimore County and the western and most southerly portions of Baltimore. It also took in Carroll County.[7]

In the 1862 redistricting process, Maryland was reduced to having only five congressional districts. The second was cut down in size though to only having Harford County, eastern and northern Baltimore County including some areas now within the city boundaries on Baltimore.[8]

In the 1872 redistricting, Maryland rose to six districts. However the area of the 2nd district increased. This was partly because it lost some of its area on the east side of Baltimore to the third district. It now also consisted of virtually all of Baltimore county, and the northern reaches of Baltimore. Cecil County was returned to its area, but Kent County remained in the first district. Carroll County was also put back in the second district. Thus the second district in 1873 was closer to that of 1853 than of 1871 in terms of the area within its boundaries.[9]

In 1890, there was a small portion of the city of Baltimore that was moved from the 4th district and placed in the 7th district. It appears this was in the general area where Freemont meets Fulton and then a little further south along Freemont.[10] These boundaries remained until the 1898 elections. In that year a few more north-west Baltimore neighborhoods were transferred from the 4th to the 2nd district, as well as a few north-central Baltimore neighborhoods.[11]

In 1902, another change was done to congressional district boundaries in Maryland. With the northward growth of population in Baltimore the 4th and 3rd districts boundaries were moved into areas previously in the 2nd district. however areas in north-west Baltimore that were closer to down-town were shifted into the 2nd district. Cecil County was moved to the first district. The arm of Baltimore County around Arbutus had long been in the 5th District but at this point it was transferred into the 2nd district.[12] These remained the boundaries of the 2nd district for the next 50 years.

In 1952, Maryland redrew its congressional districts because it had gained another seat in Congress. The 2nd district lost all of its area within the city of Baltimore, so it now consisted of Baltimore, Carroll and Harford Counties.[13]

In 1966, Maryland redrew its congressional districts to follow the rule of "One man, one vote". This was especially necessary since the state had been electing one of its congressmen at large in the previous two elections. A portion of Baltimore County along Baltimore's north-east border was removed from the 2nd district. The Arbutus section of Baltimore county was also removed from the district along with a slightly further north portion of the county reaching to about Garrison. Most of Carroll County was moved to the Maryland panhandle based 6th district.[14]

In 1972, Harford County was moved to the First District. The remaining portion of Carroll County was moved to the 6th district. However the Garrison area of Baltimore County, all of Baltimore county east of Baltimore and even a very small part of Baltimore itself were moved back into the second district.[14]

In 1982, some of the areas that had been in the 2nd district just north and west of Baltimore were moved into Maryland's 3rd congressional district. At the same time, a part of Harford County was moved back into the 2nd congressional district.[15]

In 2012, the district was found to be the eleventh least compact congressional district in the United States.[16]

Recent election results in statewide racesEdit

Year Office Results
2000 President Bush 55%–41%
2004 President Kerry 54%–45%
2008 President Obama 60%–38%
2012 President Obama 62%–35%
2016 President Clinton 60%–35%
2018 Governor Hogan 56%–43%
2020 President Biden 66%–32%

Recent electionsEdit

2000sEdit

2000 Maryland's 2nd congressional district election[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert Ehrlich (incumbent) 178,556 68.6
Democratic Kenneth T. Bosley 81,591 31.3
Write-ins 285 0.1
Total votes 260,432 100.00
2002 Maryland's 2nd congressional district election[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dutch Ruppersberger (incumbent) 105,718 54.3
Republican Helen Bentley 88,954 45.7
Total votes 194,672 100.00
Democratic gain from Republican
2004 Maryland's 2nd congressional district election[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dutch Ruppersberger (incumbent) 164,751 66.7
Republican Jane Brooks 75,812 30.7
Green Helen Bentley 6,508 2.6
Total votes 247,071 100.00

/

Marylands's 2nd congressional district election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Dutch Ruppersberger (inc.) 135,818 69.21% +2.53
Republican Jimmy Mathis 60,195 30.68%
Write-ins 215 0.11%
Total votes 196,228 100.00
Democratic hold
Maryland's 2nd Congressional District: 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Dutch Ruppersberger (incumbent) 198,578 71.86% +2.65
Republican Richard Matthews 68,561 24.81% −5.87
Libertarian Lorenzo Gaztanaga 8,786 3.18% +3.18
No party Write-ins 408 0.15
Total votes 276,333 100.00
Democratic hold Swing

2010sEdit

Maryland's 2nd Congressional District: 2010
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Dutch Ruppersberger (incumbent) 134,133 64.21% −7.65
Republican Marcelo Cardarelli 69,523 33.28% +8.47
Libertarian Lorenzo Gaztanaga 5,090 2.44% −0.74
No party Write-ins 158 0.08%
Total votes 208,904 100.00
Democratic hold
Maryland's 2nd congressional district, 2012[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dutch Ruppersberger (incumbent) 194,088 65.6
Republican Nancy Jacobs 92,071 31.1
Libertarian Leo Wayne Dymowski 9,344 3.2
N/A Write-ins 437 0.1
Total votes 295,940 100.0
Democratic hold
Maryland's 2nd congressional district, 2014[19]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dutch Ruppersberger (incumbent) 120,412 61.3
Republican David Banach 70,411 35.9
Green Ian Schlakman 5,326 2.7
N/A Write-ins 205 0.1
Total votes 196,354 100.0
Democratic hold
Maryland's 2nd congressional district, 2016[20]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dutch Ruppersberger (incumbent) 192,183 62.1
Republican Pat McDonough 102,577 33.1
Libertarian Kristin S. Kasprzak 14,128 4.6
N/A Write-ins 592 0.2
Total votes 309,480 100.0
Democratic hold
Maryland's 2nd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dutch Ruppersberger (incumbent) 167,201 66.0
Republican Liz Matory 77,782 30.7
Libertarian Michael Carney 5,215 2.1
Green Guillaume "Guy" Mimoun 2,904 1.1
N/A Write-ins 200 0.1
Total votes 253,302 100.0
Democratic hold

2020sEdit

Maryland's 2nd congressional district, 2020[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dutch Ruppersberger (incumbent) 224,836 67.7
Republican Johnny Ray Salling 106,355 32.0
Write-in 835 0.3
Total votes 332,026 100.0
Democratic hold

List of members representing the districtEdit

Member Years Congress Party Electoral history
1  
Joshua Seney
March 4, 1789 –
December 6, 1792
1st
2nd
Anti-Administration Elected in 1789.
Re-elected in 1790.
Resigned to become Chief Justice of Maryland's 3rd Judicial District.
Vacant December 6, 1792 –
January 30, 1793
2nd
2  
William Hindman
January 30, 1793 –
March 3, 1793
Pro-Administration Elected January 7, 1793 to finish Seney's term and seated January 30, 1793 having already been elected in the 7th district.
3  
John Francis Mercer
March 4, 1793 –
April 13, 1794
3rd Anti-Administration Redistricted from the 3rd district and re-elected in 1792.
Resigned.
Vacant April 13, 1794 –
November 11, 1794
4  
Gabriel Duvall
November 11, 1794 –
March 3, 1795
3rd
4th
Anti-Administration Elected May 5, 1794 to finish Mercer's term.
Re-elected in 1794.
Resigned to become Chief Justice of General Court of Maryland.
March 4, 1795 –
March 28, 1796
Democratic-Republican
Vacant March 28, 1796 –
May 5, 1796
4th
5 Richard Sprigg Jr. May 5, 1796 –
March 3, 1799
4th
5th
Democratic-Republican Elected to finish Duvall's term.
Re-elected in 1796.
Lost re-election.
6  
John Chew Thomas
March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1801
6th Federalist Elected in 1798.
Lost re-election.
7 Richard Sprigg Jr. March 4, 1801 –
February 11, 1802
7th Democratic-Republican Elected in 1801.
Resigned.
Vacant February 11, 1802 –
March 24, 1802
8 Walter Bowie March 24, 1802 –
March 3, 1805
7th
8th
Democratic-Republican Elected March 2, 1802 to finish Sprigg's term.
Re-elected in 1803.
Retired.
9 Leonard Covington March 4, 1805 –
March 3, 1807
9th Democratic-Republican Elected in 1804.
Lost re-election.
10 Archibald Van Horne March 4, 1807 –
March 3, 1811
10th
11th
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Retired.
11  
Joseph Kent
March 4, 1811 –
March 3, 1815
12th
13th
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1810.
Re-elected in 1812.
Lost re-election.
12  
John Carlyle Herbert
March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1819
14th
15th
Federalist Elected in 1814.
Re-elected in 1816.
Retired.
13  
Joseph Kent
March 4, 1819 –
March 3, 1825
16th
17th
18th
19th
Democratic-Republican[a] Elected in 1818.
Re-elected in 1820.
Re-elected in 1822.
Re-elected in 1824.
Resigned to become Governor of Maryland.
March 4, 1825 –
January 6, 1826
Anti-Jackson
Vacant January 6, 1826 –
February 1, 1826
19th
14 John Crompton Weems February 1, 1826 –
March 3, 1829
19th
20th
Jackson Elected to finish Kent's term.
Re-elected in 1826.
[data unknown/missing]
15 Benedict Joseph Semmes March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1833
21st
22nd
Anti-Jackson Elected in 1829.
Re-elected in 1831.
[data unknown/missing]
16  
Richard Bennett Carmichael
March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1835
23rd Jackson Elected in 1833.
[data unknown/missing]
17  
James Alfred Pearce
March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1839
24th
25th
Whig Elected in 1835.
Re-elected in 1837.
[data unknown/missing]
18  
Philip Francis Thomas
March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1841
26th Democratic Elected in 1839.
[data unknown/missing]
19  
James Alfred Pearce
March 4, 1841 –
March 3, 1843
27th Whig Elected in 1841.
[data unknown/missing]
20 Francis Brengle March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
28th Whig Elected late in 1844.
[data unknown/missing]
21 Thomas Johns Perry March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
29th Democratic Elected in 1845.
[data unknown/missing]
22  
James Dixon Roman
March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1849
30th Whig Elected in 1847.
[data unknown/missing]
23  
William Thomas Hamilton
March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1853
31st
32nd
Democratic Elected in 1849.
Re-elected in 1851.
Redistricted to the 5th district.
24 Jacob Shower March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd Democratic Elected in 1853.
[data unknown/missing]
25  
James Barroll Ricaud
March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1859
34th
35th
Know Nothing Elected in 1855.
Re-elected in 1857.
[data unknown/missing]
26  
Edwin Hanson Webster
March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
36th
37th
38th
39th
Know Nothing Elected in 1859.
Re-elected in 1861.
Re-elected in 1863.
Re-elected in 1864.
Resigned after being appointed collector of customs at the port of Baltimore.
March 4, 1861 –
March 3, 1863
Unionist [data unknown/missing]
March 4, 1863 –
July 1865
Unconditional Unionist [data unknown/missing]
Vacant July 1865 –
December 4, 1865
39th
27  
John Lewis Thomas Jr.
December 4, 1865 –
March 3, 1867
Unconditional Unionist Elected to finish Webster's term.
[data unknown/missing]
28  
Stevenson Archer
March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1875
40th
41st
42nd
43rd
Democratic Elected in 1866.
Re-elected in 1868.
Re-elected in 1870.
Re-elected in 1872.
[data unknown/missing]
29  
Charles Boyle Roberts
March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879
44th
45th
Democratic Elected in 1874.
Re-elected in 1876.
[data unknown/missing]
30  
Joshua Frederick Cockey Talbott
March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1885
46th
47th
48th
Democratic Elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Re-elected in 1882.
[data unknown/missing]
31 Frank Thomas Shaw March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1889
49th
50th
Democratic Elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886.
[data unknown/missing]
32  
Herman Stump
March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1893
51st
52nd
Democratic Elected in 1888.
Re-elected in 1890.
[data unknown/missing]
33  
Joshua Frederick Cockey Talbott
March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1895
53rd Democratic Elected in 1892.
[data unknown/missing]
34  
William Benjamin Baker
March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1901
54th
55th
56th
Republican Elected in 1894.
Re-elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
[data unknown/missing]
35  
Albert Alexander Blakeney
March 4, 1901 –
March 3, 1903
57th Republican Elected in 1900.
[data unknown/missing]
36  
Joshua Frederick Cockey Talbott
March 4, 1903 –
October 5, 1918
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
Democratic Elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Died.
Vacant October 5, 1918 –
November 5, 1918
65th
37  
Carville Dickinson Benson
November 5, 1918 –
March 3, 1921
65th
66th
Democratic Elected to finish Talbott's term.
Re-elected in 1918.
[data unknown/missing]
38  
Albert Alexander Blakeney
March 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1923
67th Republican Elected in 1920.
[data unknown/missing]
39  
Millard Evelyn Tydings
March 4, 1923 –
March 3, 1927
68th
69th
Democratic Elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
[data unknown/missing]
40  
William Purington Cole Jr.
March 4, 1927 –
March 3, 1929
70th Democratic Elected in 1926.
[data unknown/missing]
41 Linwood Leon Clark March 4, 1929 –
March 3, 1931
71st Republican Elected in 1928.
[data unknown/missing]
42  
William Purington Cole Jr.
March 4, 1931 –
October 26, 1942
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
Democratic Elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Resigned to become judge of US Customs Court.
Vacant October 26, 1942 –
January 3, 1943
77th
43 Harry Streett Baldwin January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1947
78th
79th
Democratic Elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
[data unknown/missing]
44 Hugh Allen Meade January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1949
80th Democratic Elected in 1946.
[data unknown/missing]
45 William P. Bolton January 3, 1949 –
January 3, 1951
81st Democratic Elected in 1948.
[data unknown/missing]
46  
James Patrick Sinnott Devereux
January 3, 1951 –
January 3, 1959
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
Republican Elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
[data unknown/missing]
47  
Daniel Baugh Brewster
January 3, 1959 –
January 3, 1963
86th
87th
Democratic Elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
[data unknown/missing]
48  
Clarence Dickinson Long
January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1985
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
Democratic Elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
[data unknown/missing]
49  
Helen Delich Bentley
January 3, 1985 –
January 3, 1995
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
Republican Elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Retired to run for Governor of Maryland.
50  
Bob Ehrlich
January 3, 1995 –
January 3, 2003
104th
105th
106th
107th
Republican Elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Retired to run for Governor of Maryland.
51  
Dutch Ruppersberger
January 3, 2003 –
Present
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
116th
117th
Democratic Elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.

Historical district boundariesEdit

 
2003–2013

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Supported the Adams-Clay faction in the 1824 United States presidential election

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "My Congressional District".
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. ^ Parsons, Stanley B., William W. Beach and Dan Hermann. United States Congressional Districts 1788-1841 (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1978) p. 9
  4. ^ Martis, Kenneth C. Historical Atlas of Political Parties in Congress. (New York: Macmillan, 1989) p. 76
  5. ^ Martis. Historical Atlas. p. 93
  6. ^ Martis. Historical Atlas. p. 97
  7. ^ Martis. Historical Atlas. p. 107
  8. ^ Martis. Historical Atlas. p. 117
  9. ^ Martis. Historical Atlas. p. 127.
  10. ^ Historical Maps of Maryland
  11. ^ Martis. Historical Atlas. p. 155
  12. ^ Martis. Historical Atlas, p. 157.
  13. ^ Martis. Historical Atlas. p. 215
  14. ^ a b Martis. Historical Atlas. p. 217.
  15. ^ Martis. Historical Atlas. p. 237
  16. ^ Lazarick, Len (October 3, 2012). "Maryland has least compact congressional districts in nation". MarylandReporter.com. Retrieved October 7, 2012.
  17. ^ a b c https://ballotpedia.org/Maryland%27s_2nd_Congressional_District
  18. ^ "Official 2012 Presidential General Election results for Representative in Congress". Maryland State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 12, 2012.
  19. ^ Maryland State Board of Elections. "2014 Election Results". Retrieved December 17, 2014.
  20. ^ "Official 2016 Presidential General Election results for Representative in Congress". Maryland Secretary of State. Retrieved December 9, 2016.
  21. ^ "Official 2020 Presidential General Election results for Representative in Congress". Maryland State Board of Elections. Retrieved December 14, 2020.

Coordinates: 39°18′N 76°30′W / 39.3°N 76.5°W / 39.3; -76.5