Wisconsin's 1st congressional district

Wisconsin's 1st congressional district is a congressional district of the United States House of Representatives in southeastern Wisconsin, covering Kenosha County, Racine County, and most of Walworth County, as well as portions of Rock County, Waukesha County, and Milwaukee County. The district's current Representative is Republican Bryan Steil.

Wisconsin's 1st congressional district
Wisconsin US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
Wisconsin's 1st congressional district – since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Bryan Steil
RJanesville
Area1,679.95 sq mi (4,351.1 km2)
Distribution
  • 15.87% rural
Population (2019)721,691[1]
Median household
income
$68,695[2]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+7[4]

Among the district's previous representatives are U.S. Secretary of Defense Les Aspin and Speaker of the House and 2012 Vice Presidential-nominee Paul Ryan.

A slightly Republican-leaning district, it was carried by George W. Bush in 2004 with 53%; the district voted for Barack Obama over John McCain in 2008, 51.40–47.45% and the district voted for Mitt Romney over Barack Obama in 2012, 52.12%–47.88%.[5] It stayed Republican in 2016, with a majority of voters polling for Donald Trump.[6]

Recent election results from statewide racesEdit

Currently, it is a swing district that leans Republican.

Year Office Results
2000 President Al Gore 49% – George W. Bush 47%
2004 President George W. Bush 54% – John Kerry 46%
2008 President Barack Obama 51% – John McCain 48%
2012 President Mitt Romney 52% – Barack Obama 47%
2016 President Donald Trump 53% – Hillary Clinton 42%
Senate Ron Johnson 56% – Russ Feingold 42%
2018 Senate Leah Vukmir 50% – Tammy Baldwin 49%
2020 President Donald Trump 53% – Joe Biden 44%

List of members representing the districtEdit

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history District
District created June 5, 1848
 
1st congressional district (red) used solely for the initial spring 1848 election.
 
William Pitt Lynde
Democratic June 5, 1848 –
March 3, 1849
30th Elected to the short term in 1848.
Lost re-election.
 
Charles Durkee
Free Soil March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1853
31st
32nd
Elected to the regular term in 1848.
Re-elected in 1850.
Retired.
 
1st congressional district (red) for the fall 1848 general election and every election through 1860.
 
Daniel Wells Jr.
Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1857
33rd
34th
Elected in 1852.
Re-elected in 1854.
Retired.
 
John F. Potter
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1863
35th
36th
37th
Elected in 1856.
Re-elected in 1858.
Re-elected in 1860.
Lost re-election.
 
James S. Brown
Democratic March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1865
38th Elected in 1862.
Withdrew from re-election.
 
1st congressional district (red) for the 1862 general election and every election through 1870.
 
Halbert E. Paine
Republican March 4, 1865 –
March 3, 1871
39th
40th
41st
Elected in 1864.
Re-elected in 1866.
Re-elected in 1868.
Retired.
 
Alexander Mitchell
Democratic March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1873
42nd Elected in 1870.
Redistricted to the 4th district.
 
Charles G. Williams
Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1883
43rd
44th
45th
46th
47th
Elected in 1872.
Re-elected in 1874.
Re-elected in 1876.
Re-elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Lost re-election.
 
1st congressional district (red) for the 1872 general election and every election through 1880.
 
John Winans
Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1885
48th Elected in 1882.
Retired to run for mayor of Janesville.
 
Lucien B. Caswell
Republican March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1891
49th
50th
51st
Elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886.
Re-elected in 1888.
Lost renomination.
 
Clinton Babbitt
Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
52nd Elected in 1890.
Lost re-election.
 
Henry Allen Cooper
Republican March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1919
53rd
54th
55th
56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
Elected in 1892.
Re-elected in 1894.
Re-elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Lost renomination and lost re-election as an independent.
 
Clifford E. Randall
Republican March 4, 1919 –
March 3, 1921
66th Elected in 1918.
Lost renomination.
 
Henry Allen Cooper
Republican March 4, 1921 –
March 1, 1931
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
Elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930 but died before next term began.
Vacant March 1, 1931 –
October 13, 1931
71st
72nd
 
Thomas Ryum Amlie
Republican October 13, 1931 –
March 3, 1933
72nd Elected to finish Cooper's term.
Lost renomination.
 
George Washington Blanchard
Republican March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1935
73rd Elected in 1932.
Renominated but withdrew prior to election.
 
Thomas Ryum Amlie
Progressive January 3, 1935 –
January 3, 1939
74th
75th
Elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Retired to run for U.S. senator.
 
Stephen Bolles
Republican January 3, 1939 –
July 8, 1941
76th
77th
Elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Died.
Vacant July 8, 1941 –
August 29, 1941
77th
 
Lawrence H. Smith
Republican August 29, 1941 –
January 22, 1958
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
Elected to finish Bolles's term.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Died.
Vacant January 22, 1958 –
January 3, 1959
85th
 
Gerald T. Flynn
Democratic January 3, 1959 –
January 3, 1961
86th Elected in 1958.
Lost re-election.
 
Henry C. Schadeberg
Republican January 3, 1961 –
January 3, 1965
87th
88th
Elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Lost re-election.
 
Lynn E. Stalbaum
Democratic January 3, 1965 –
January 3, 1967
89th Elected in 1964.
Lost re-election.
 
Henry C. Schadeberg
Republican January 3, 1967 –
January 3, 1971
90th
91st
Elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Lost re-election.
 
Les Aspin
Democratic January 3, 1971 –
January 20, 1993
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
Elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Resigned to become U.S. Secretary of Defense.
Vacant January 20, 1993 –
May 4, 1993
103rd
 
Peter W. Barca
Democratic May 4, 1993 –
January 3, 1995
Elected to finish Aspin's term.
Lost re-election.
 
Mark Neumann
Republican January 3, 1995 –
January 3, 1999
104th
105th
Elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Retired to run for U.S. senator.
 
Paul Ryan
Republican January 3, 1999 –
January 3, 2019
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
Elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Retired.
 
Bryan Steil
Republican January 3, 2019 –
Present
116th
117th
Elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.

Recent election resultsEdit

2012Edit

Wisconsin 1st Congressional District 2012 [7][8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paul Ryan (Incumbent) 200,423 54.90
Democratic Rob Zerban 158,414 43.39
Libertarian Keith Deschler 6,054 1.66
none Scattering 167 0.05
Total votes 365,058 100.0

2014Edit

Wisconsin's 1st congressional district, 2014[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paul Ryan (incumbent) 182,316 63.3
Democratic Rob Zerban 105,552 36.6
N/A Write-ins 302 0.1
Total votes 288,170 100.0
Republican hold

2016Edit

Wisconsin's 1st congressional district, 2016[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paul Ryan (incumbent) 230,072 64.9
Democratic Ryan Solen 107,003 30.2
Independent Spencer Zimmerman 9,429 2.7
Libertarian Jason Lebeck 7,486 2.1
N/A Write-ins 255 0.1
Total votes 354,245 100.0
Republican hold

2018Edit

Wisconsin's 1st congressional district, 2018[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bryan Steil 177,492 54.6
Democratic Randy Bryce 137,508 42.2
Independent Ken Yorgan 10,006 3.1
Independent Joseph Kexel (write-in) 7 0.0
N/A Write-ins 304 0.1
Total votes 325,317 100.0
Republican hold

2020Edit

Wisconsin's 1st congressional district, 2020[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bryan Steil (incumbent) 238,271 59.3
Democratic Roger Polack 163,170 40.6
Write-in 313 0.1
Total votes 401,754 100.0
Republican hold

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "My Congressional District". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved March 19, 2018.
  2. ^ Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP), US Census Bureau. "My Congressional District". www.census.gov.
  3. ^ "Census profile: Congressional District 1, WI". Census Reporter.
  4. ^ "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  5. ^ "Presidential Canvass Results".
  6. ^ "White working-class voters flipped Wisconsin red". Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  7. ^ "Wisconsin Government Accountability Board County by County Congress Seats" (PDF). State of Wisconsin Government Accountability Board. November 21, 2012. Retrieved April 4, 2013.
  8. ^ Scatterings votes are included as they were reported to the Clerk of the House of Representatives"Election Statistics US House of Representatives - 2012". Karen Haas, Clerk of the United States House of Representatives. February 28, 2013. Retrieved March 31, 2013.
  9. ^ "Wisconsin Statewide Results General Election - November 4, 2014 Official Results". Wisconsin Secretary of State. November 4, 2014. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  10. ^ "Wisconsin Elections Commission". Wisconsin Elections Commission. November 8, 2016. Retrieved December 2, 2016.
  11. ^ Johnson, Cheryl L. (February 28, 2019). "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 2018". Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  12. ^ "Canvass Results for 2020 General Election" (PDF). Wisconsin Elections Commission. Retrieved December 2, 2020.
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by Home district of the Speaker
October 29, 2015 – January 3, 2019
Succeeded by

Coordinates: 42°41′43″N 88°02′47″W / 42.69528°N 88.04639°W / 42.69528; -88.04639