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Michigan's 3rd congressional district

Michigan's 3rd congressional district is a United States Congressional district in Western Michigan. From 2003 to 2013 it consisted of the counties of Barry, Ionia, and all except the northwest portion of Kent. The district was extended to Battle Creek after redistricting in 2012.

Michigan's 3rd congressional district
Michigan US Congressional District 3 (since 2013).tif
Michigan's 3rd congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Justin Amash
RCascade Township
Distribution
  • 68.54[1]% urban
  • 31.46% rural
Population (2016)733,618[2]
Median income$58,999[3]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+6[4]

The district is currently represented by Republican Justin Amash, one of the youngest members of the House. In the 2010 General Election, Amash, then a State Representative, defeated Democrat Pat Miles to take the seat he currently holds.

Contents

Major citiesEdit

VotingEdit

Election results from presidential races
Year Office Results
1992 President Bush 46 - 34%
1996 President Dole 53 - 39%
2000 President Bush 60 - 38%
2004 President Bush 59 - 40%
2008 President McCain 49 - 48%
2012 President Romney 53 - 46%
2016 President Trump 52 - 42%

Formerly 5th Congressional DistrictEdit

From 1873 to 1993 the Congressional District that included Grand Rapids was numbered as Michigan's 5th. In 1993 it was renumbered the 3rd, and the 5th became the Congressional District that included Bay City.

History of 3rd congressional districtEdit

Prior to 1992 the 3rd congressional district largely consisted of Calhoun County the home of Battle Creek and Eaton County along with about half the area of Lansing, and Kalamazoo County, including the city of Kalamazoo, but not Portage and the adjacent south-ward township. With the 1992 redistricting the old 3rd district was split between the 6th congressional district, and the 7th congressional district with most of Lansing itself going to the 8th congressional district.

List of representativesEdit

Representative Party Years Cong
ress
Notes
District created March 4, 1843
  James B. Hunt Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1847
28
29
[Data unknown/missing.]
  Kinsley S. Bingham Democratic March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1851
30
31
[Data unknown/missing.]
  James L. Conger Whig March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
32 [Data unknown/missing.]
  Samuel Clark Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33 [Data unknown/missing.]
  David S. Walbridge Republican March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1859
34
35
[Data unknown/missing.]
  Francis William Kellogg Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1863
36
37
Redistricted to the 4th district
  John W. Longyear Republican March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1867
38
39
[Data unknown/missing.]
  Austin Blair Republican March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1873
40
41
42
[Data unknown/missing.]
  George Willard Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1877
43
44
[Data unknown/missing.]
  Jonas H. McGowan Republican March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1881
45
46
[Data unknown/missing.]
  Edward S. Lacey Republican March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1885
47
48
[Data unknown/missing.]
  James O'Donnell Republican March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1893
49
50
51
52
[Data unknown/missing.]
  Julius C. Burrows Republican March 4, 1893 –
January 23, 1895
53 Redistricted from the 4th district
Re-elected but then resigned after being elected to the U.S. Senate
Vacant January 23, 1895 –
December 2, 1895
54
  Alfred Milnes Republican December 2, 1895 –
March 3, 1897
Elected to finish Burrows' term
  Albert M. Todd Democratic[5] March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1899
55 [Data unknown/missing.]
  Washington Gardner Republican March 4, 1899 –
March 3, 1911
56
57
58
59
60
61
[Data unknown/missing.]
  John M. C. Smith Republican March 4, 1911 –
March 3, 1921
62
63
64
65
66
[Data unknown/missing.]
  William H. Frankhauser Republican March 4, 1921 –
May 9, 1921
67 Died
Vacant May 9, 1921 –
June 28, 1921
  John M. C. Smith Republican June 28, 1921 –
March 30, 1923
67
68
First elected to finish Frankhauser's term
Died
Vacant March 30, 1923 –
June 19, 1923
68
  Arthur B. Williams Republican June 19, 1923 –
May 1, 1925
68
69
First elected to finish Smith's term
Died
Vacant May 1, 1925 –
August 18, 1925
69
  Joseph L. Hooper Republican August 18, 1925 –
February 22, 1934
69
70
71
72
73
First elected to finish Williams's term
Died
Vacant February 22, 1934 –
January 3, 1935
73
  Henry M. Kimball Republican January 3, 1935 –
October 19, 1935
74 Died
Vacant October 19, 1935 –
December 17, 1935
  Verner Main Republican December 17, 1935 –
January 3, 1937
First elected to finish Kimball's term
Lost renomination
  Paul W. Shafer Republican January 3, 1937 –
August 17, 1954
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
Died
Vacant August 17, 1954 –
January 3, 1955
83
  August E. Johansen Republican January 3, 1955 –
January 3, 1965
84
85
86
87
88
[Data unknown/missing.]
  Paul H. Todd, Jr. Democratic January 3, 1965 –
January 3, 1967
89 [Data unknown/missing.]
  Garry E. Brown Republican January 3, 1967 –
January 3, 1979
90
91
92
94
95
[Data unknown/missing.]
  Howard Wolpe Democratic January 3, 1979 –
January 3, 1993
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
Retired in an unsuccessful run for Governor of Michigan
  Paul B. Henry Republican January 3, 1993 –
July 31, 1993
103 Redistricted from the 5th district
Died
Vacant July 31, 1993 –
December 7, 1993
  Vern Ehlers Republican December 7, 1993 –
January 3, 2011
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
Elected to finish Henry's term
Retired
  Justin Amash Republican January 3, 2011 –
Present
112
113
114
115
116
First elected in 2010
Re-elected in 2012
Re-elected in 2014
Re-elected in 2016
Re-elected in 2018

Historical district boundariesEdit

 
1993 - 2003
 
2003 - 2013

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ MICHIGAN CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS BY URBAN AND RURAL POPULATION AND LAND AREA
  2. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=26&cd=03
  3. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=26&cd=03
  4. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  5. ^ In 1896, Albert M. Todd and Ferdinand Brucker were elected on the "Democratic Peoples Union Silver" ticket, a union of elements from the Democratic Party and Populist Party. They were seated as part of the Democratic Party in Congress.

ReferencesEdit

Coordinates: 42°43′12″N 85°14′14″W / 42.72000°N 85.23722°W / 42.72000; -85.23722