Portal:Michigan

The Michigan Portal

Location of Michigan within the United States

Michigan (/ˈmɪʃɪɡən/ (listen)) is a state in the Great Lakes region of the upper Midwestern United States. With a population of nearly 10.12 million and an area of nearly 97,000 sq mi (250,000 km2), Michigan is the 10th-largest state by population, the 11th-largest by area, and the largest by area east of the Mississippi River. Its capital is Lansing, and its largest city is Detroit. Metro Detroit is among the nation's most populous and largest metropolitan economies. Its name derives from a gallicized variant of the original Ojibwe word ᒥᓯᑲᒥ (mishigami), meaning "large water" or "large lake".

Michigan consists of two peninsulas. The Lower Peninsula resembles the shape of a mitten, and comprises a majority of the state's land area. The Upper Peninsula (often called "the U.P.") is separated from the Lower Peninsula by the Straits of Mackinac, a five-mile (8 km) channel that joins Lake Huron to Lake Michigan. The Mackinac Bridge connects the peninsulas. Michigan has the longest freshwater coastline of any political subdivision in the United States, being bordered by four of the five Great Lakes and Lake St. Clair. It also has 64,980 inland lakes and ponds. Michigan has the second-most water of any state, behind only Alaska.

The area was first occupied by a succession of Native American tribes over thousands of years. In the 17th century, French explorers claimed it as part of the New France colony, when it was largely inhabited by indigenous peoples. French and Canadian traders and settlers, Métis, and others migrated to the area, settling largely along the waterways. After France's defeat in the French and Indian War in 1762, the region came under British rule. Britain ceded the territory to the newly independent United States after Britain's defeat in the American Revolutionary War.

The area was part of the larger Northwest Territory until 1800, when western Michigan became part of the Indiana Territory. Michigan Territory was formed in 1805, but some of the northern border with Canada was not agreed upon until after the War of 1812. Michigan was admitted into the Union in 1837 as the 26th state, a free one. It soon became an important center of industry and trade in the Great Lakes region, attracting immigrants in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from many European countries. Immigrants from Finland, Macedonia, and the Netherlands were especially numerous. Migration from Appalachia and of Black Southerners as part of the Great Migration increased in the 1930s, with many settling in Metro Detroit. (Full article...)

Symbol support vote.svg Recognized content - show another Cscr-featured.png

Entries here consist of Good and Featured articles, which meet a core set of high editorial standards.

SS Edmund Fitzgerald in 1971

SS Edmund Fitzgerald was an American Great Lakes freighter that sank in Lake Superior during a storm on November 10, 1975, with the loss of the entire crew of 29 men. When launched on June 7, 1958, she was the largest ship on North America's Great Lakes, and she remains the largest to have sunk there. She was located in deep water on November 14, 1975, by a U.S. Navy aircraft detecting magnetic anomalies, and found soon afterwards to be in two large pieces.

For 17 years, Edmund Fitzgerald carried taconite iron ore from mines near Duluth, Minnesota, to iron works in Detroit, Toledo, and other Great Lakes ports. As a workhorse, she set seasonal haul records six times, often breaking her own record. Captain Peter Pulcer was known for piping music day or night over the ship's intercom while passing through the St. Clair and Detroit rivers (between lakes Huron and Erie), and entertaining spectators at the Soo Locks (between Lakes Superior and Huron) with a running commentary about the ship. Her size, record-breaking performance, and "DJ captain" endeared Edmund Fitzgerald to boat watchers. (Full article...)
List of recognized articles

Selected picture - show another

Tahquamenon Falls
Credit: Sujit kumar

The Tahquamenon Falls are two different waterfalls on the Tahquamenon River. Both sets are located near Lake Superior in the eastern Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The water is notably brown in color from the tannins leached from the cedar swamps which the river drains.

Did you know - load new batch

  • ... that WILS-TV in Lansing, Michigan, featured a singing weather girl and pianist dressed appropriately for the next day's forecast?
  • ... that when the 1959 Michigan football team defeated Ohio State, opposing coach Woody Hayes whirled and hurled pieces of clothing, drawing a comparison to a "hot stripper"?
  • ... that despite having reportedly been destroyed in 1946, the 16-ton granite ball that once sat on top of the Columbia University sundial reappeared in a Michigan field in 2001?
  • ... that with the designation of County Highway A-2 in 1970, Mrs. Howard "Gene" Temple became the first Michigan woman to acquire a highway designation from the State Highway Commission?
  • ... that in 2020, Eli Savit was elected the prosecuting attorney of Washtenaw County, Michigan, on a promise to abolish the cash bail system?
  • ... that before Angeli Foods was sold this year, the first self-service grocery store in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan had been owned by three generations of a single family?

Related portals

Selected article - show another

Detroit Skyline (123143197).jpeg

Detroit (/dɪˈtrɔɪt/ dih-TROYT, locally also /ˈdtrɔɪt/ DEE-troyt; French: Détroit, lit.'strait') is the largest city in the U.S. state of Michigan. It is also the largest U.S. city on the United States–Canada border, and the seat of government of Wayne County. The City of Detroit had a population of 639,111 at the 2020 census, making it the 27th-most populous city in the United States. The metropolitan area, known as Metro Detroit, is home to 4.3 million people, making it the second-largest in the Midwest after the Chicago metropolitan area, and the 14th-largest in the United States. Regarded as a major cultural center, Detroit is known for its contributions to music, art, architecture and design, in addition to its historical automotive background. Time named Detroit as one of the fifty World's Greatest Places of 2022 to explore.

Detroit is a major port on the Detroit River, one of the four major straits that connect the Great Lakes system to the Saint Lawrence Seaway. The City of Detroit anchors the second-largest regional economy in the Midwest, behind Chicago and ahead of Minneapolis–Saint Paul, and the 14th-largest in the United States. Detroit is best known as the center of the U.S. automobile industry, and the "Big Three" auto manufacturers General Motors, Ford, and Stellantis North America (Chrysler) are all headquartered in Metro Detroit. , the Detroit metropolitan area is the number one exporting region among 310 defined metropolitan areas in the United States. The Detroit Metropolitan Airport is among the most important hub airports in the United States. Detroit and its neighboring Canadian city Windsor are connected through a highway tunnel, railway tunnel, and the Ambassador Bridge, which is the second-busiest international crossing in North America, after San Diego–Tijuana. (Full article...)
List of selected articles

Selected biography - show another

Goebel in 1922

Paul Gordon Goebel (May 28, 1901 – January 26, 1988) was an American football end who played for the University of Michigan Wolverines from 1920 to 1922. He was an All-American in 1921 and was the team's captain in 1922. He played professional football from 1923 to 1926 with the Columbus Tigers, Chicago Bears, and New York Yankees. He was named to the NFL All-Pro team in 1923 and 1924.

After his football career ended, he operated a sporting good store in Grand Rapids. He officiated football games for the Big Ten Conference for 16 years and also served in the U.S. Navy on an aircraft carrier in World War II. He was active in Republican Party politics in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and was one of the organizers of a reform movement to oust the city's political boss, Frank McKay. As an anti-McKay reform candidate, Goebel was three times elected mayor of Grand Rapids in the 1950s. He was later elected to the University of Michigan Board of Regents, where he served from 1962 to 1970. (Full article...)

General images

The following are images from various Michigan-related articles on Wikipedia.
(from Michigan)
  • Image 19Union members occupying a General Motors body factory during the Flint Sit-Down Strike of 1937 which spurred the organization of militant CIO unions in auto industry (from History of Michigan)

    Union members occupying a General Motors body factory during the Flint Sit-Down Strike of 1937 which spurred the organization of militant CIO unions in auto industry (from History of Michigan)

  • Image 20Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor is the largest stadium in the Western Hemisphere, and the third-largest stadium in the world. (from Michigan)

    Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor is the largest stadium in the Western Hemisphere, and the third-largest stadium in the world. (from Michigan)

  • Image 21Map of the Saint Lawrence River/Great Lakes Watershed in North America. Its drainage area includes the Great Lakes, the world's largest system of freshwater lakes. The basin covers nearly all of Michigan. (from Michigan)

    Map of the Saint Lawrence River/Great Lakes Watershed in North America. Its drainage area includes the Great Lakes, the world's largest system of freshwater lakes. The basin covers nearly all of Michigan. (from Michigan)

  • A treemap depicting the distribution of Michigan's jobs as percentages of entire workforce

    Distribution of Michigan's jobs as percentages of entire workforce (from Michigan)

  • Image 23The Mackinac Bridge, a suspension bridge spanning the Straits of Mackinac to connect the Upper and Lower peninsulas of Michigan (from Michigan)

    The Mackinac Bridge, a suspension bridge spanning the Straits of Mackinac to connect the Upper and Lower peninsulas of Michigan (from Michigan)

  • Image 24Mackinac Island is well-known for cultural events and a wide variety of architectural styles, including the Victorian Grand Hotel (from Michigan)

    Mackinac Island is well-known for cultural events and a wide variety of architectural styles, including the Victorian Grand Hotel (from Michigan)

  • Image 26Map of the British and French settlements in North America in 1750, before the French and Indian War (1754 to 1763) (from History of Michigan)

    Map of the British and French settlements in North America in 1750, before the French and Indian War (1754 to 1763) (from History of Michigan)

  • Image 27Aerial view of Detroit Metro Airport (DTW) (from Michigan)

    Aerial view of Detroit Metro Airport (DTW) (from Michigan)

  • Image 28The Tahquamenon Falls in the Upper Peninsula (from Michigan)

    The Tahquamenon Falls in the Upper Peninsula (from Michigan)

  • Image 29Treaty of Paris, by Benjamin West (1783), an unfinished painting of the American diplomatic negotiators of the Treaty of Paris which brought official conclusion to the Revolutionary War and gave possession of Michigan and other territory to the new United States (from Michigan)

    Treaty of Paris, by Benjamin West (1783), an unfinished painting of the American diplomatic negotiators of the Treaty of Paris which brought official conclusion to the Revolutionary War and gave possession of Michigan and other territory to the new United States (from Michigan)

  • Image 31Michigan is the leading U.S. producer of tart cherries, blueberries, pickling cucumbers, navy beans and petunias. (from Michigan)

    Michigan is the leading U.S. producer of tart cherries, blueberries, pickling cucumbers, navy beans and petunias. (from Michigan)

  • Image 32Mackinac Island, an island and resort area at the eastern end of the Straits of Mackinac. More than 80% of the island is preserved as Mackinac Island State Park. (from Michigan)

    Mackinac Island, an island and resort area at the eastern end of the Straits of Mackinac. More than 80% of the island is preserved as Mackinac Island State Park. (from Michigan)

  • Image 33Governor Gretchen Whitmer (D) speaking at a National Guard ceremony in 2019 (from Michigan)

    Governor Gretchen Whitmer (D) speaking at a National Guard ceremony in 2019 (from Michigan)

  • Image 34Map of British America showing the original boundaries of the Province of Quebec and its Quebec Act of 1774 post-annexation boundaries (from Michigan)

    Map of British America showing the original boundaries of the Province of Quebec and its Quebec Act of 1774 post-annexation boundaries (from Michigan)

  • Image 35The world headquarters of the Kellogg's Company in Battle Creek (from Michigan)

    The world headquarters of the Kellogg's Company in Battle Creek (from Michigan)

  • Image 36The Michigan State Capitol in Lansing houses the legislative branch of the government of the U.S. state of Michigan. (from Michigan)

    The Michigan State Capitol in Lansing houses the legislative branch of the government of the U.S. state of Michigan. (from Michigan)

  • Image 37The Great Seal of the State of Michigan (from History of Michigan)

    The Great Seal of the State of Michigan (from History of Michigan)

  • Image 38The Ambassador Bridge, a suspension bridge that connects Detroit with Windsor, Ontario, in Canada. It is the busiest international border crossing in North America in terms of trade volume. (from Michigan)

    The Ambassador Bridge, a suspension bridge that connects Detroit with Windsor, Ontario, in Canada. It is the busiest international border crossing in North America in terms of trade volume. (from Michigan)

  • Image 39Michigan is the center of the American automotive industry. The Renaissance Center in Downtown Detroit is the world headquarter of General Motors. (from Michigan)

    Michigan is the center of the American automotive industry. The Renaissance Center in Downtown Detroit is the world headquarter of General Motors. (from Michigan)

  • Image 40Michigan in 1718, Guillaume de L'Isle map, approximate state area highlighted (from History of Michigan)

    Michigan in 1718, Guillaume de L'Isle map, approximate state area highlighted (from History of Michigan)

  • Image 41Holland, Michigan, is the home of the Tulip Time Festival, the largest tulip festival in the U.S. (from Michigan)

    Holland, Michigan, is the home of the Tulip Time Festival, the largest tulip festival in the U.S. (from Michigan)

  • Image 43The Huron National Wildlife Refuge, one of the fifteen federal wildernesses in Michigan (from Michigan)

    The Huron National Wildlife Refuge, one of the fifteen federal wildernesses in Michigan (from Michigan)

  • Image 44Cranbrook Schools, one of the leading college preparatory boarding schools in the country (from Michigan)

    Cranbrook Schools, one of the leading college preparatory boarding schools in the country (from Michigan)

  • Image 45Treaty of Paris, by Benjamin West (1783), an unfinished painting of the American diplomatic negotiators of the Treaty of Paris which brought official conclusion to the Revolutionary War and gave possession of Michigan and other territory to the new United States (from History of Michigan)

    Treaty of Paris, by Benjamin West (1783), an unfinished painting of the American diplomatic negotiators of the Treaty of Paris which brought official conclusion to the Revolutionary War and gave possession of Michigan and other territory to the new United States (from History of Michigan)

  • Image 46The floor of the Michigan House of Representatives (from Michigan)

    The floor of the Michigan House of Representatives (from Michigan)

  • Image 47The Basilica of Sainte Anne de Détroit is the second-oldest continuously operating Roman Catholic parish in the country. (from Michigan)

    The Basilica of Sainte Anne de Détroit is the second-oldest continuously operating Roman Catholic parish in the country. (from Michigan)

  • Topics

    Categories

    Category puzzle
    Select [►] to view subcategories

    Wikimedia

    The following Wikimedia Foundation sister projects provide more on this subject:

    Things you can do

    Discover Wikipedia using portals