Wisconsin's 7th congressional district

Wisconsin's 7th congressional district is a congressional district of the United States House of Representatives in northwestern and central Wisconsin; it is the largest congressional district in the state geographically, covering 20 counties (in whole or part), for a total of 18,787 sq mi. The district contains the following counties: Ashland, Barron, Bayfield, Burnett, St. Croix, Chippewa (partial), Clark, Douglas, Florence, Forest, Iron, Jackson (partial), Juneau (partial), Langlade, Lincoln, Marathon, Monroe (partial) Oneida, Polk, Price, Rusk, Sawyer, Taylor, Vilas, Washburn, and Wood (partial).

Wisconsin's 7th congressional district
Interactive map of district boundaries
Representative
  Tom Tiffany
RMinocqua
Area18,786.53 sq mi (48,656.9 km2)
Distribution
  • 57.96% rural
  • 42.04% urban
Population (2019)714,544
Median household
income
$60,706[1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+12[3]

The district is currently represented by Republican Tom Tiffany.

While in 2008, the district gave 56% of the vote to Barack Obama, it has swung to the Republicans in recent presidential elections with Mitt Romney winning with 51% of the vote in 2012 and Donald Trump winning with 58% of the vote in 2016. Additionally, left-leaning Portage County (which contains the city of Stevens Point) was removed from the 7th and added to the 3rd during the hotly contested 2013 redistricting. Since these shifts, the rural 7th has surpassed the suburban 5th as the most Republican district in Wisconsin.

Agriculture is a major industry and employer in the rural 7th district.[4] This district has been a major producer of milk from cows, grains, oilseeds, dry beans, and dry peas.[5] 60% of the farmland in this district is used for crop production, another major economic stimulant.

List of members representing the districtEdit

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history District
District created March 4, 1873 Buffalo, Clark, Eau Claire, Jackson, La Crosse, Monroe, Pepin, Pierce, St. Croix, Trempealeau, & Vernon counties
 
Jeremiah Rusk
Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1877
43rd
44th
Redistricted from the 6th district and re-elected in 1872.
Re-elected in 1874.
Retired.
 
Herman L. Humphrey
Republican March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1883
45th
46th
47th
Elected in 1876.
Re-elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Lost renomination.
 
Gilbert M. Woodward
Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1885
48th Elected in 1882.
Lost re-election.
Crawford, Juneau, La Crosse, Monroe, Richland, Sauk, & Vernon counties
 
Ormsby B. Thomas
Republican March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1891
49th
50th
51st
Elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886.
Re-elected in 1888.
Lost re-election.
 
Frank P. Coburn
Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
52nd Elected in 1890.
Lost re-election.
 
George B. Shaw
Republican March 4, 1893 –
August 27, 1894
53rd Elected in 1892.
Died.
Buffalo, Eau Claire, Jackson, La Crosse, Monroe, Pepin, & Trempealeau counties
Vacant August 27, 1894 –
November 5, 1894
 
Michael Griffin
Republican November 5, 1894 –
March 3, 1899
53rd
54th
55th
Elected to finish Shaw's term.
Also elected to the next full term.
Re-elected in 1896.
Retired.
 
John J. Esch
Republican March 4, 1899 –
March 3, 1921
56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
66th
Elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Lost renomination.
Buffalo, Clark, Eau Claire, Jackson, La Crosse, Monroe, Pepin, & Trempealeau counties
Adams, Clark, Jackson, Juneau, La Crosse, Monroe, Sauk, & Vernon counties
 
Joseph D. Beck
Republican March 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1929
67th
68th
69th
70th
Elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Retired to run for Governor of Wisconsin.
 
Merlin Hull
Republican March 4, 1929 –
March 3, 1931
71st Elected in 1928.
Lost renomination.
 
Gardner R. Withrow
Republican March 4, 1931 –
March 3, 1933
72nd Elected in 1930.
Redistricted to the 3rd district.
 
Gerald J. Boileau
Republican March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1935
73rd
74th
75th
Redistricted from the 8th district and re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Lost re-election.
Adams, Green Lake, Langlade, Marathon, Marquette, Portage, Shawano, Waupaca, Waushara, & Wood counties
Progressive January 3, 1935 –
January 3, 1939
 
Reid F. Murray
Republican January 3, 1939 –
April 29, 1952
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
Elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Died.
Vacant April 29, 1952 –
January 3, 1953
82nd
 
Melvin Laird
Republican January 3, 1953 –
January 21, 1969
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
Elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Resigned to become U.S. Secretary of Defense.
Adams, Clark, Florence, Forest, Langlade, Lincoln, Marathon, Marquette, Menominee, Portage, Shawano, Taylor, Waupaca, Waushara, & Wood counties
Vacant January 21, 1969 –
April 1, 1969
91st
 
Dave Obey
Democratic April 1, 1969 –
January 3, 2011
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
Elected to finish Laird's term.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Retired.
Ashland, Bayfield, Burnett, Chippewa, Clark, Douglas, Iron, Lincoln, Marathon, Portage, Price, Rusk, Sawyer, Taylor, Washburn, & Wood counties &
    • All of Oneida County except for the town of Enterprise
Ashland, Bayfield, Burnett, Chippewa, Douglas, Iron, Lincoln, Marathon, Portage, Price, Rusk, Sawyer, Taylor, & Washburn counties &
northern Clark County, southeast Oneida County, northern Polk County, & most of Wood County
    • Clark County
      • Town of Colby
      • Town of Green Grove
      • Town of Hixon
      • Town of Hoard
      • Town of Longwood
      • Town of Mayville
      • Town of Reseburg
      • Town of Thorp
      • Town of Withee
      • Town of Worden
      • Village of Curtiss
      • Village of Dorchester
      • Village of Withee
      • the part of the village of Unity in the county
      • City of Owen
      • City of Thorp
      • the part of the city of Abbotsford in the county
      • the part of the city of Colby in the county
    • Oneida County
      • Town of Crescent
      • Town of Enterprise
      • Town of Monico
      • Town of Pelican
      • Town of Schoepke
      • City of Rhinelander
    • Polk County
      • Town of Bone Lake
      • Town of Clam Falls
      • Town of Eureka
      • Town of Georgetown
      • Town of Laketown
      • Town of Lorain
      • Town of Luck
      • Town of McKinley
      • Town of Milltown
      • Town of Sterling
      • Town of West Sweden
      • Villages of Frederic
      • Villages of Luck
      • Villages of Milltown
    • Wood County
      • Town of Arpin
      • Town of Auburndale
      • Town of Cameron
      • Town of Cary
      • Town of Dexter
      • Town of Grand Rapids
      • Town of Hansen
      • Town of Lincoln
      • Town of Marshfield
      • Town of Milladore
      • Town of Richfield
      • Town of Rock
      • Town of Rudolph
      • Town of Seneca
      • Town of Sherry
      • Town of Sigel
      • Town of Wood
      • Village of Arpin
      • Village of Auburndale
      • Village of Biron
      • Village of Hewitt
      • Village of Port Edwards
      • Village of Rudolph
      • Village of Vesper
      • the part of the village of Milladore in the county
      • City of Nekoosa
      • City of Pittsville
      • City of Wisconsin Rapids
      • the part of the city of Marshfield in the county
 
Sean Duffy
Republican January 3, 2011 –
September 23, 2019
112th
113th
114th
115th
116th
Elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Resigned due to family health issues.
Vacant September 23, 2019 –
May 12, 2020
116th
117th
 
Tom Tiffany
Republican May 12, 2020[6]
present
Elected to finish Duffy's term.
Re-elected in 2020.

Recent election resultsEdit

2002 district boundaries (2002–2011)Edit

Year Date Elected Defeated Total Plurality
2002[7] Nov. 5 Dave Obey (inc) Democratic 146,364 64.21% Joe Rothbauer Rep. 81,518 35.76% 227,955 64,846
2004[8] Nov. 2 Dave Obey (inc) Democratic 241,306 85.64% Mike Miles Grn. 26,518 9.41% 281,752 214,788
Larry Oftedahl Con. 12,841 4.56%
2006[9] Nov. 7 Dave Obey (inc) Democratic 161,903 62.17% Nick Reid Rep. 91,069 34.97% 260,428 70,834
Mike Miles Grn. 7,391 2.84%
2008[10] Nov. 4 Dave Obey (inc) Democratic 212,666 60.79% Dan Mielke Rep. 136,938 39.14% 349,837 75,728
2010[11] Nov. 2 Sean Duffy Republican 132,551 52.11% Julie Lassa Dem. 113,018 44.43% 254,389 19,533
Gary Kauther Ind. 8,397 3.30%

2011 district boundaries (2012–2021)Edit

Year Date Elected Defeated Total Plurality
2012[12] Nov. 6 Sean Duffy (inc) Republican 201,720 56.08% Pat Kreitlow Dem. 157,524 43.80% 359,669 44,196
Dale C. Lehner (write-in) Ind. 20 0.01%
2014[13] Nov. 4 Sean Duffy (inc) Republican 169,891 59.28% Kelly Westlund Dem. 112,949 39.41% 286,603 56,942
Lawrence Dale Ind. 3,686 1.29%
Tob Taylor (write-in) Ind. 30 0.01%
John Schiess (write-in) Ind. 5 0.00%
2016[14] Nov. 8 Sean Duffy (inc) Republican 223,418 61.67% Mary Hoeft Dem. 138,643 38.27% 362,271 84,775
2018[15] Nov. 6 Sean Duffy (inc) Republican 194,061 60.11% Margaret Engebretson Dem. 124,307 38.50% 322,840 69,754
Ken Driessen Ind. 4,416 1.37%
2020[16] (special) May 12 Tom Tiffany Republican 109,498 57.11% Tricia Zunker Dem. 82,135 42.84% 191,720 27,363
Michael Opela (write-in) Rep. 3 0.00%
Dennis Paulaha (write-in) Ind. 2 0.00%
2020[17] Nov. 3 Tom Tiffany (inc) Republican 252,048 60.73% Tricia Zunker Dem. 162,741 39.21% 415,007 89,307

Election results from recent presidential racesEdit

Year Results
2000 Gore 48 - 47%
2004 Kerry 50 - 49%
2008 Obama 56 - 43%
2012 Romney 51 - 48%
2016 Trump 58 - 37%
2020 Trump 59 - 39%

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

General
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present
Specific
  1. ^ "My Congressional District".
  2. ^ "Census profile: Congressional District 7, WI".
  3. ^ "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  4. ^ "The Future of Farming and Rural Life in Wisconsin: Findings, Recommendations, Steps to a Healthy Future" (PDF).
  5. ^ "2012 Congressional District Profiles" (PDF). United States Department of Agriculture - National Agricultural Statistics Service.
  6. ^ "Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress - Retro Member details".
  7. ^ Results of Fall General Election - 11/05/2002 (PDF) (Report). Wisconsin State Elections Board. December 2, 2002. p. 5. Retrieved April 10, 2022.
  8. ^ Results of Fall General Election - 11/02/2004 (PDF) (Report). Wisconsin State Elections Board. December 1, 2004. p. 5. Retrieved September 23, 2021.
  9. ^ Results of Fall General Election - 11/07/2006 (PDF) (Report). Wisconsin State Elections Board. December 5, 2006. p. 6. Retrieved September 23, 2021.
  10. ^ Results of Fall General Election - 11/04/2008 (PDF) (Report). Wisconsin State Elections Board. December 1, 2008. p. 7. Retrieved September 23, 2021.
  11. ^ 2010 Fall General Election Results Summary (PDF) (Report). Wisconsin Government Accountability Board. October 4, 2010. pp. 3–4. Retrieved September 23, 2021.
  12. ^ Canvass Results for 2012 Presidential and General Election - 11/6/2012 (PDF) (Report). Wisconsin Government Accountability Board. November 6, 2012. p. 4. Retrieved September 23, 2021.
  13. ^ Canvass Results for 2014 General Election - 11/4/2014 (PDF) (Report). Wisconsin Government Accountability Board. November 26, 2014. pp. 4–5. Retrieved September 23, 2021.
  14. ^ Canvass Results for 2016 General Election - 11/8/2016 (PDF) (Report). Wisconsin Elections Commission. December 22, 2016. pp. 4–5. Retrieved September 23, 2021.
  15. ^ Canvass Results for 2018 General Election - 11/6/2018 (PDF) (Report). Wisconsin Elections Commission. February 22, 2019. p. 5. Retrieved September 23, 2021.
  16. ^ Canvass Results for 2020 Special Election Representative in Congress District 7 - 5/12/2020 (PDF) (Report). Wisconsin Elections Commission. June 10, 2020. p. 1. Retrieved April 10, 2022.
  17. ^ Canvass Results for 2020 General Election - 11/3/2020 (PDF) (Report). Wisconsin Elections Commission. November 18, 2020. p. 2. Retrieved September 23, 2021.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 45°41′56″N 90°39′19″W / 45.69889°N 90.65528°W / 45.69889; -90.65528