Tennessee's 2nd congressional district

The 2nd congressional district of Tennessee is a congressional district in East Tennessee. It has been represented by Republican Tim Burchett since January 2019.

Tennessee's 2nd congressional district
Tennessee US Congressional District 2 (since 2013).tif
Tennessee's 2nd congressional district since January 3, 2013
Representative
  Tim Burchett
RKnoxville
Distribution
  • 74.15% urban[1]
  • 25.85% rural
Population (2019)758,519[2]
Median household
income
$57,777[2]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+18[3]

Current boundariesEdit

The district is located in East Tennessee and borders Kentucky to the north and North Carolina to the south.

It currently covers all of Blount, Claiborne, Grainger, Knox, and Loudon counties, along with a sliver of Campbell County and a large portion of Jefferson County.

CharacteristicsEdit

The district is based in Knoxville, and is largely coextensive with that city's metropolitan area.

The area is known for being the home of the flagship campus for the University of Tennessee, hosting the 1982 World's Fair, and for being the headquarters for the Tennessee Valley Authority, Ruby Tuesday, and Pilot Flying J.

The 2nd is similar in character to the neighboring 1st, and has long been one of the safest districts in the nation for the Republican Party. No Democrat has represented the district since 1855, and Republicans have held the district continuously since 1859 -- the longest time any party has held any district. The Democrats waged some competitive races in the district during the 1930s. However, they have not put up a substantive candidate in the district since 1964, and have only managed 40 percent of the vote twice since then.

Most of its residents supported the Union over the Confederacy during the American Civil War; it was one of four districts whose congressmen did not resign when Tennessee seceded from the Union in 1861. The area's residents immediately identified with the Republicans after hostilities ceased. Much of that sentiment was derived from the region's economic base of small-scale farming, with little or no use for slavery; thus, voters were mostly indifferent or hostile to the concerns of plantation owners and other landed interests farther west in the state, who aligned themselves with the Democratic Party. This loyalty has persisted through good times and bad ever since, despite the vast ideological changes in both political parties since that time.

The few Democratic pockets in the district are located in Knoxville, which occasionally elects Democratic mayors and occasionally sends Democrats to the state legislature. However, they are no match for the overwhelming Republican bent of the rest of Knox County, as well as the more suburban and rural areas. For example, Blount and Grainger counties are among the few counties in the country to have never supported a Democrat for president.

This district traditionally gives its congressmen very long tenures in Washington, electing some of the few truly senior Southern Republican congressmen before the 1950s. Since 1909, only seven people (not counting caretakers) have represented the district–Richard W. Austin, J. Will Taylor, John Jennings Jr., Howard Baker Sr., John Duncan Sr., Jimmy Duncan, and Burchett. All six of Burchett's predecessors have served at least ten years in Congress, with Taylor and the Duncans holding the seat for at least twenty years.

Election results from presidential racesEdit

Year Office Result
2000 President George W. Bush 59% - Al Gore 39%
2004 President George W. Bush 64% - John Kerry 35%
2008 President John McCain 64% - Barack Obama 34.5%
2012 President Mitt Romney 67.3% - Barack Obama 31%
2016 President Donald Trump 65% - Hillary Clinton 29.7%
2020 President Donald Trump 63% - Joe Biden 34.5%

HistoryEdit

Although the district has taken many forms over the years, it has been centered on Knoxville since 1853.

During the Civil War era, the area was represented in Congress by Horace Maynard. Maynard switched parties many times, but was pro-Union, and did not resign from Congress when Tennessee seceded. Maynard entered Congress in 1857 (four years before the outbreak of the Civil War), but did not leave entirely until 1875 (ten years after the Civil War ended).

For a short period in the 1870s, the area was represented by Jacob M. Thornburgh. For the 44th United States Congress, Thornburgh was the only Republican in the Tennessee delegation.

Following Thornburgh's retirement, the district chose former Union colonel Leonidas C. Houk, who served until his death in 1891, upon which he was succeeded by his son John.

In late 1893, John faced a primary challenge from Henry R. Gibson. Gibson was chosen following this narrow and divisive primary, then went on to serve in Congress for ten years.

Gibson did not seek re-election in 1904 and was succeeded by Nathan W. Hale, who served only two terms.

Similar in character to the Houk/Gibson primary in 1893, Hale faced a divisive primary with eventual winner Richard W. Austin in 1908.

Ten years later, Austin himself was defeated for the Republican nomination, being edged out by former state Republican chairman J. Will Taylor. Taylor managed to serve for twenty years until his death in 1939.

In a special election to fill the vacancy left by Taylor's death, the district elected former judge John Jennings, Jr.. Jennings' tenure nearly perfectly coincided with the 1940s decade.

In 1950, Jennings was defeated in primary by former district attorney Howard Baker, Sr.. Baker served for thirteen years until his death in 1964, where he was succeeded by his widow Irene who did not seek re-election.

In the 1964 election, the district chose Knoxville mayor John Duncan, Sr.. Duncan served for 23 years before his death in summer 1988.

Following Duncan's death, the district elected his son, Jimmy. The younger Duncan served for just over thirty years from late 1988 until his successor was sworn in early January 2019.

Upon Jimmy Duncan's retirement, the district chose outgoing Knox County mayor Tim Burchett, who has served since January 2019.

List of members representing the districtEdit

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history District location
District created March 4, 1805
 
George W. Campbell
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1805 –
March 3, 1809
9th
10th
Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1805.
Re-elected in 1807.
Retired to become judge of the Tennessee Supreme Court.
1805–1813
"Hamilton district"
 
Robert Weakley
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1809 –
March 3, 1811
11th Elected in 1809.
Retired.
 
John Sevier
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1811 –
September 24, 1815
12th
13th
14th
Elected in 1811.
Re-elected in 1813.
Re-elected in 1815.
Died.
1813–1823
[data unknown/missing]
Vacant September 24, 1815 –
December 8, 1815
14th
William G. Blount Democratic-Republican December 8, 1815 –
March 3, 1819
14th
15th
Elected to finish Sevier's term.
Re-elected in 1817.
Retired.
John A. Cocke Democratic-Republican[a] March 4, 1819 –
March 3, 1825
16th
17th
18th
19th
Elected in 1819.
Re-elected in 1821.
Re-elected in 1823.
Re-elected in 1825.
Retired.
1823–1833
[data unknown/missing]
Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
Pryor Lea Jacksonian March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1831
20th
21st
Elected in 1827.
Re-elected in 1829.
Lost re-election.
Thomas D. Arnold Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1833
22nd Elected in 1831.
Redistricted to the 1st district and lost re-election.
Samuel Bunch Jacksonian March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1835
23rd
24th
Elected in 1833.
Re-elected in 1835.
Lost re-election.
1833–1843
[data unknown/missing]
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
Abraham McClellan Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1843
25th
26th
27th
Elected in 1837.
Re-elected in 1839.
Re-elected in 1841.
Retired.
William T. Senter Whig March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
28th Elected in 1842.
Retired.
1843–1853
[data unknown/missing]
William M. Cocke Whig March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1849
29th
30th
Elected in 1845.
Re-elected in 1847.
Lost re-election as a Democrat.
Albert G. Watkins Whig March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1853
31st
32nd
Elected in 1849.
Re-elected in 1851.
Redistricted to the 1st district and lost re-election.
William M. Churchwell Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd Redistricted from the 3rd district and re-elected in 1853.
Retired.
1853–1863
[data unknown/missing]
William H. Sneed Know Nothing March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th Elected in 1855.
Retired.
 
Horace Maynard
Know Nothing March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
35th
36th
37th
Elected in 1857.
Re-elected in 1859.
Re-elected in 1861.
Could not seek re-election, as state was under Confederate occupation.
Opposition March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
Unionist March 4, 1861 –
March 3, 1863
Vacant March 4, 1863 –
July 24, 1866
38th
39th
Civil War 1863–1873
[data unknown/missing]
 
Horace Maynard
Unconditional Unionist July 24, 1866 –
March 3, 1867
39th
40th
41st
42nd
Elected in 1865.
Re-elected in 1867.
Re-elected in 1868.
Re-elected in 1870.
Redistricted to the at-large district.
Republican March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1873
 
Jacob M. Thornburgh
Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1879
43rd
44th
45th
Elected in 1872.
Re-elected in 1874.
Re-elected in 1876.
Retired.
1873–1883
[data unknown/missing]
 
Leonidas C. Houk
Republican March 4, 1879 –
May 25, 1891
46th
47th
48th
49th
50th
51st
52nd
Elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Re-elected in 1882.
Re-elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886.
Re-elected in 1888.
Re-elected in 1890.
Died.
1883–1893
[data unknown/missing]
Vacant May 25, 1891 –
December 7, 1891
52nd
 
John C. Houk
Republican December 7, 1891 –
March 3, 1895
52nd
53rd
Elected to finish his father's term.
Re-elected in 1892.
Lost renomination and lost re-election as an Independent Republican.
1893–1903
[data unknown/missing]
 
Henry R. Gibson
Republican March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1905
54th
55th
56th
57th
58th
Elected in 1894.
Re-elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Retired.
1903–1913
[data unknown/missing]
 
Nathan W. Hale
Republican March 4, 1905 –
March 3, 1909
59th
60th
Elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Lost re-election.
 
Richard W. Austin
Republican March 4, 1909 –
March 3, 1919
61st
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
Elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Lost renomination and lost re-election as an Independent.
1913–1923
[data unknown/missing]
 
J. Will Taylor
Republican March 4, 1919 –
November 14, 1939
66th
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
76th
Elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Died.
1923–1933
[data unknown/missing]
1933–1943
[data unknown/missing]
Vacant November 14, 1939 –
December 30, 1939
76th
 
John Jennings Jr.
Republican December 30, 1939 –
January 3, 1951
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
Elected to finish Taylor's term.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Lost renomination.
1943–1953
[data unknown/missing]
 
Howard H. Baker
Republican January 3, 1951 –
January 7, 1964
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
Elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Died.
1953–1963
[data unknown/missing]
1963–1973
[data unknown/missing]
Vacant January 7, 1964 –
March 10, 1964
88th
 
Irene Baker
Republican March 10, 1964 –
January 3, 1965
Elected to finish her husband's term.
Retired.
 
John J. Duncan
Republican January 3, 1965 –
June 21, 1988
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
Elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Died.
1973–1983
[data unknown/missing]
1983–1993
[data unknown/missing]
Vacant June 21, 1988 –
November 7, 1988
100th
 
John J. Duncan Jr.
Republican November 8, 1988 –
January 3, 2019
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
Elected to finish his father's term.
Also elected to the next full term.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Retired.
1993–2013
[data unknown/missing]
2003–2013
 
2013–present
 
 
Tim Burchett
Republican January 3, 2019 –
present
116th
117th
Elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020

Recent election resultsEdit

2012Edit

Tennessee's 2nd congressional district, 2012
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John J. Duncan, Jr. (incumbent) 196,894 74.4
Democratic Troy Goodale 54,522 20.6
Green Norris Dryer 5,733 2.2
Libertarian Greg Samples 4,382 1.7
Independent Brandon Stewart 2,974 1.1
Total votes 264,505 100
Republican hold

2014Edit

Tennessee's 2nd congressional district, 2014
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John J. Duncan, Jr. (incumbent) 120,833 72.5
Democratic Bob Scott 37,612 22.6
Green Norris Dryer 4,033 2.4
Independent Casey Adam Gouge 4,223 2.5
Total votes 166,701 100.0
Republican hold

2016Edit

Tennessee's 2nd congressional district, 2016
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John J. Duncan, Jr. (incumbent) 212,455 75.6
Democratic Stuart Starr 68,401 24.4
Total votes 280,856 100.0
Republican hold

2018Edit

Tennessee's 2nd congressional district, 2018[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tim Burchett 172,856 65.9
Democratic Renee Hoyos 86,668 33.1
Independent Greg Samples 967 0.4
Independent Jeffrey Grunau 657 0.3
Independent Marc Whitmire 637 0.2
Independent Keith LaTorre 349 0.1
Total votes 262,134 100.0
Republican hold

2020Edit

Tennessee's 2nd congressional district, 2020[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tim Burchett (incumbent) 238,907 67.6
Democratic Renee Hoyos 109,684 31.1
Independent Matthew Campbell 4,592 1.3
Write-in 14 0.0
Total votes 353,197 100.0
Republican hold

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Supported the Jackson faction in the 1824 United States presidential election

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/cd_state.html
  2. ^ a b Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP), US Census Bureau. "My Congressional District". www.census.gov.
  3. ^ "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  4. ^ Johnson, Cheryl L. (February 28, 2019). "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 2018". Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  5. ^ State of Tennessee General Election Results, November 3, 2020, Results By Office (PDF) (Report). Secretary of State of Tennessee. December 2, 2020. Retrieved December 2, 2020.

Coordinates: 36°03′01″N 83°49′16″W / 36.05028°N 83.82111°W / 36.05028; -83.82111