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Illinois's 11th congressional district

The 11th Congressional District of Illinois is represented by Democrat Bill Foster.

Illinois's 11th congressional district
Illinois US Congressional District 11 (since 2013).tif
Illinois's 11th congressional district – since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Bill Foster
DNaperville
Area281 sq mi (730 km2)
Distribution
  • 99.7% urban
  • 0.3% rural
Population (2011 est.)722,745
Median income$75,446[1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+9[2][3]

Contents

District boundariesEdit

From 1865 to 1867 the district included Bureau, LaSalle, Livingston and Woodford counties.[4] From 1901 until 1947 the 11th congressional district included Kane, DuPage, McHenry and Will Counties. Following the Congressional Apportionment Act of 1947, the district covered a portion of Cook County and the far northwest side of Chicago roughly centered on Norwood Park.[5] The district was not changed by 1951's redistricting.[6] In 1961, the district was widened westward to the Des Plaines River and east into parts of Lincoln Square.[7] The district covered the northwest side of Chicago until the early 1990s when it moved closer to its current area, encompassing most of LaSalle and Grundy Counties, the southern part of Will County, the northern part of Kankakee County and a small portion of southwestern Cook County.[8] The Illinois Congressional Reapportionment Act of 2001 (10 ILCS 76) defined its boundaries following the U.S. Census 2000.

Following the U.S. Census 2010 the district includes Joliet in Will County, parts of Naperville in southern DuPage County, and Aurora in Kane County. It includes the Argonne National Laboratory.

2011 redistrictingEdit

The congressional district covers parts of Cook, Du Page, Kane, Kendall and Will counties, as of the 2011 redistricting which followed the 2010 census. All or parts of Aurora, Bolingbrook, Darien, Joliet, Montgomery, Naperville, Lisle, Downers Grove, New Lenox, Shorewood and Woodridge are included.[9] The representatives for these districts were elected in the 2012 primary and general elections, and the boundaries became effective on January 5, 2013.

ElectionsEdit

VotingEdit

Election results from presidential races
Year Office Results
2016 President Clinton 58 – 35%[3]
2012 President Obama 58 – 41%[3]
2008 President Obama 62 – 37%[3]
2004 President Bush 53 – 46%
2000 President Bush 50 – 48%

RepresentativesEdit

Representative Party Years Cong
ress
District Home
  James C. Robinson Democratic March 4, 1863 – March 3, 1865 38th Redistricted from the 7th district
  Samuel S. Marshall Democratic March 4, 1865 – March 3, 1873 39th
40th
41st
42nd
Redistricted to the 19th district
  Robert M. Knapp Democratic March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1875 43rd
  Scott Wike Democratic March 4, 1875 – March 3, 1877 44th
  Robert M. Knapp Democratic March 4, 1877 – March 3, 1879 45th
  James W. Singleton Democratic March 4, 1879 – March 3, 1883 46th
47th
  William Neece Democratic March 4, 1883 – March 3, 1887 48th
49th
  William Gest Republican March 4, 1887 – March 3, 1891 50th
51st
Benjamin Cable Democratic March 4, 1891 – March 3, 1893 52nd
  Benjamin F. Marsh Republican March 4, 1893 – March 3, 1895 53rd Redistricted to the 15th district
  Walter Reeves Republican March 4, 1895 – March 3, 1903 54th
55th
56th
57th
  Howard Snapp Republican March 4, 1903 – March 3, 1911 58th
59th
60th
61st
  Ira C. Copley Republican March 4, 1911 – March 3, 1915 62nd
63rd
Progressive March 4, 1915 – March 3, 1917 64th
Republican March 4, 1917 – March 3, 1923 65th
66th
67th
  Frank Reid Republican March 4, 1923 – January 3, 1935 68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
  Chauncey Reed Republican January 3, 1935 – January 3, 1949 74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
Redistricted to the 14th district
  Chester Chesney Democratic January 3, 1949 – January 3, 1951 81st
  Timothy P. Sheehan Republican January 3, 1951 – January 3, 1959 82nd
83rd
84th
85th
  Roman Pucinski Democratic January 3, 1959 – January 3, 1973 86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
  Frank Annunzio Democratic January 3, 1973 – January 3, 1993 93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
Redistricted from the 7th district
  George E. Sangmeister Democratic January 3, 1993 – January 3, 1995 103rd Redistricted from the 4th district
  Jerry Weller Republican January 3, 1995 – January 3, 2009 104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
Declined to run for re-election
  Debbie Halvorson Democratic January 3, 2009 – January 3, 2011 111th Defeated
  Adam Kinzinger Republican January 3, 2011 – January 3, 2013 112th Redistricted to the 16th district
  Bill Foster Democratic January 3, 2013 - present 113th
114th
115th
116th
Defeated in the 14th district in 2010

Historical maps of boundariesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=17&cd=11
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d Barone, Michael; McCutcheon, Chuck (2013). The Almanac of American Politics 2014. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN 978-0-226-10544-4. Copyright National Journal.
  4. ^ eli.sls.lib.il.us
  5. ^ eli.sls.lib.il.us
  6. ^ eli.sls.lib.il.us
  7. ^ eli.sls.lib.il.us
  8. ^ eli.sls.lib.il.us
  9. ^ Illinois Congressional District 11, Illinois Board of Elections

External linksEdit

Living former Members of the U.S. House of Representatives from Illinois's 11th congressional districtEdit

As of May 2015, three former members of the U.S. House of Representatives from Illinois's 11th congressional district are alive.

Representative Term in office Date of birth (and age)
Adam Kinzinger 2011 - 2013 (1978-02-27) February 27, 1978 (age 41)
Debbie Halvorson 2009 - 2011 (1958-03-01) March 1, 1958 (age 61)
Jerry Weller 1995 - 2009 (1957-07-07) July 7, 1957 (age 62)

Coordinates: 41°38′34″N 88°08′45″W / 41.64278°N 88.14583°W / 41.64278; -88.14583