Illinois's 10th congressional district

The 10th congressional district of Illinois lies in the northeast corner of the state, and mostly comprises northern suburbs of Chicago. It was created after the 1860 census. The district is currently represented by Democrat Brad Schneider.

Illinois's 10th congressional district
Illinois US Congressional District 10 (since 2013).tif
Illinois's 10th congressional district since January 3, 2013
Representative
  Brad Schneider
DDeerfield
Area300 sq mi (780 km2)
Distribution
  • 99.7% urban
  • 0.3% rural
Population (2019)706,189
Median household
income
$84,608[1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+14[2][3]

2011 redistrictingEdit

The district covers parts of Cook and Lake counties, as of the 2011 redistricting which followed the 2010 census. All or parts of Beach Park, Buffalo Grove, Deerfield, Fox Lake, Glencoe, Grayslake, Highland Park, Lake Bluff, Lake Forest, Lake Villa, Lindenhurst, Libertyville, Morton Grove, Mundelein, North Chicago, Northbrook, Prospect Heights, Round Lake, Round Lake Beach, Vernon Hills, Waukegan, Wheeling and Zion are included.[4] The boundaries became effective on January 3, 2013.

District characteristicsEdit

EconomyEdit

The 10th is home to several Fortune 500 Companies, including, but not limited to: CDW, Walgreens, Underwriters Laboratories, Caterpillar, Inc., Baxter Healthcare, AbbVie, Allstate Insurance, and Mondelez International.

MilitaryEdit

The Naval Station Great Lakes near North Chicago, hosting the United States Navy's only boot camp, trains 38,000 recruits each year. 5.2% of the district's inhabitants have performed military service.[3]

HistoryEdit

The area of the district was originally represented by one of Abraham Lincoln's closest allies, Elihu B. Washburne (R-Waukegan). The district was created in 1982 redistricting out of districts represented by John Porter (R-Wilmette) and Robert McClory (R-Lake Bluff). On the retirement of McClory, the district was represented by Porter after winning the elections of 1982, 1984, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1996, and 1998. Following Porter's retirement, 11 Republicans and two Democrats ran to succeed him. Eventually 9 Republicans and one Democrat stood for election in the primary of March 2000. John Porter's former Chief of Staff, Mark Kirk, won the Republican primary over number two rival Shaun Donnely. Kirk then defeated State Representative Lauren Beth Gash (D-Highland Park) by 2% in the 2000 general election. Kirk remained in Congress until he decided to run for the United States Senate in the 2010 election. He was succeeded by Republican Robert Dold.

ElectionsEdit

2006 electionEdit

Republican candidate for Governor, Judy Baar Topinka, and GOP candidate for Cook County Board President Tony Peraica both handily won the district in 2006, although both lost in the state- and countywide (respectively) count.

2006 Illinois's 10th congressional district election
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Kirk (incumbent) 107,929 53.38
Democratic Dan Seals 94,278 46.62
Total votes 202,207 100.00
Republican hold

2008 electionEdit

Dan Seals, who had previously run against Mark Kirk in 2006, defeated Clinton Advisor Jay Footlik for the 2008 Democratic nomination. Dave Kalbfleisch received the Green Party nomination, but was removed from the ballot by the Illinois State Board of Elections.[5][6] Independent candidate Allan Stevo was also nominated.[7] Mark Kirk defeated Dan Seals in their rematch from 2006 by 54% to 46%, thus winning a fifth term in the House.

Illinois's 10th congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Kirk (incumbent) 153,082 52.56
Democratic Dan Seals 138,176 47.44
Total votes 291,258 100.00
Republican hold

2010 electionEdit

The Republican Party nominee, Robert Dold, won against the Democratic Party nominee, Dan Seals.

Illinois's 10th district general election, November 2, 2010[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bob Dold 109,941 51.08
Democratic Dan Seals 105,290 48.92
Write-in Author C. Brumfield 1 0.00
Total votes 215,232 100.00
Republican hold

2012 electionEdit

Robert Dold no longer lives in the redrawn district,[9] but said he would move into the district if he won re-election.[10]

Candidates for the Democratic nomination were: Ilya Sheyman, a community organizer from Waukegan,[11] Brad Schneider, a business consultant,[12] John Tree, a business executive and Colonel in the Air Force Reserve,[13] and Vivek Bavda, an intellectual property attorney.[14]

In the March 20, 2012 primary, Brad Schneider won the Democratic nomination.[15] Schneider defeated Dold in the general election in November.

Illinois's 10th congressional district, 2012[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brad Schneider 133,890 50.6
Republican Bob Dold (incumbent) 130,564 49.4
Total votes 264,454 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican


2014 electionEdit

Brad Schneider, the incumbent, was selected to be the Democratic nominee, and Robert Dold was once again selected to be the Republican nominee. Dold won the election with just over 50% of the vote.

Illinois's 10th congressional district, 2014[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bob Dold 95,992 51.3
Democratic Brad Schneider (incumbent) 91,136 48.7
Total votes 187,128 100.0
Republican gain from Democratic


2016 electionEdit

Brad Schneider defeated Highland Park Mayor Nancy Rotering for the Democratic nomination on March 15.[18] Democrat Brad Schneider defeated Republican Robert Dold by nearly 5% (14,000 votes), the largest victory margin in Illinois's 10th Congressional district since redistricting.

Illinois's 10th congressional district, 2016[19]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brad Schneider 150,435 52.6
Republican Bob Dold (incumbent) 135,535 47.4
Independent Joseph William Kopsick (write-in) 26 0.0
Total votes 285,996 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican


2018 electionEdit

Brad Schneider, the incumbent, defeated his republican challenger Douglas R. Bennett with 65.6% of the vote.[20] There were three Republican candidates who ran in the primary: Bennett of Deerfield, who is a computer consultant and vice chairman of the West Deerfield Township Republican Organization, Libertyville physician and business owner Sapan Shah, and Jeremy Wynes of Highland Park.[21]

Robert Dold declined to run for a fifth time. [22]

On March 20, Douglas Bennett narrowly beat Wynes and Shah in the primary.[23]

Illinois's 10th congressional district, 2018[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brad Schneider (incumbent) 156,540 65.6
Republican Douglas Bennett 82,124 34.4
Total votes 238,664 100.0
Democratic hold


2020 electionEdit

Incumbent representative Brad Schneider faced two Democratic primary challengers in 2020. Progressive activist Andrew Wang was the first to announce a challenge to Schneider,[25] followed shortly by fellow progressive Adam Broad. After Wang dropped out and threw his support to Broad,[26] Broad fell short of qualifying for the ballot and mounted a write-in campaign.[27] Broad ultimately received less than 1% of the primary vote.[28]

In the general election, which was held on November 3rd, 2020, Schneider defeated Republican challenger Valerie Ramirez Mukherjee, earning nearly two-thirds of the vote.[29]

Illinois's 10th congressional district, 2020[30][31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Brad Schneider (incumbent) 202,402 63.87 -1.72%
Republican Valerie Ramirez Mukherjee 114,442 36.12 +1.71%
Write-in 30 0.01 N/A
Total votes 316,874 100.0
Democratic hold

Recent election resultsEdit

U.S. PresidentEdit

2000 Al Gore (D) 51 - 47%
2004 John Kerry (D) 52 - 47%
2008 Barack Obama (D) 63 - 36%[3]
2012 Barack Obama (D) 58 - 41%[3]
2016 Hillary Clinton (D) 61 - 32%
2020 Joe Biden (D) 64 - 34%

GovernorEdit

2018 J.B. Pritzker (D) 55% - 40%

SenatorEdit

2016 Tammy Duckworth (D) 53% - 42%
2020 Dick Durbin (D) 60% - 36%

U.S. RepresentativeEdit

Year Republican
candidate
Republican
percentage
Democratic
candidate
Democratic
percentage
2000 Kirk 51 Gash 49
2002 Kirk 69 Perritt 31
2004 Kirk 65 Goodman 35
2006 Kirk 53.4 Seals 46.6
2008 Kirk 52.6 Seals 47.4
2010 Dold 51.1 Seals 48.8
2012 Dold 49.4 Schneider 50.6
2014 Dold 51.3 Schneider 48.7
2016 Dold 47 Schneider 53
2018 Bennett 34.4 Schneider 65.6

List of members representing the districtEdit

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history
District created March 4, 1863
 
Anthony L. Knapp
Democratic March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1865
38th Redistricted from the 6th district and re-elected in 1862.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Anthony Thornton
Democratic March 4, 1865 –
March 3, 1867
39th Elected in 1864.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Albert G. Burr
Democratic March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1871
40th
41st
Elected in 1866.
Re-elected in 1868.
[data unknown/missing]
Edward Y. Rice Democratic March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1873
42nd Elected in 1870.
[data unknown/missing]
William H. Ray Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
43rd Elected in 1872.
[data unknown/missing]
 
John C. Bagby
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
44th Elected in 1874.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Benjamin F. Marsh
Republican March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1883
45th
46th
47th
Elected in 1876.
Re-elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Nicholas E. Worthington
Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1887
48th
49th
Elected in 1882.
Re-elected in 1884.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Philip S. Post
Republican March 4, 1887 –
January 6, 1895
50th
51st
52nd
53rd
54th
Elected in 1886.
Re-elected in 1888.
Re-elected in 1890.
Re-elected in 1892.
Re-elected in 1894.
Died.
Vacant January 6, 1895 –
December 2, 1895
54th
 
George W. Prince
Republican December 2, 1895 –
March 3, 1903
54th
55th
56th
57th
Elected to finish Post's term.
Re-elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Redistricted to the 15th district.
 
George E. Foss
Republican March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1913
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Charles M. Thomson
Progressive March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1915
63rd Elected in 1912.
[data unknown/missing]
 
George E. Foss
Republican March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1919
64th
65th
Elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Carl R. Chindblom
Republican March 4, 1919 –
March 3, 1933
66th
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
Elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
[data unknown/missing]
 
James Simpson Jr.
Republican March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1935
73rd Elected in 1932.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Ralph E. Church
Republican January 3, 1935 –
January 3, 1941
74th
75th
76th
Elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Retired to run for U.S. senator.
George A. Paddock Republican January 3, 1941 –
January 3, 1943
77th Elected in 1940.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Ralph E. Church
Republican January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1949
78th
79th
80th
Elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Redistricted to the 13th district.
 
Richard W. Hoffman
Republican January 3, 1949 –
January 3, 1957
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
Elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
[data unknown/missing]
 
Harold R. Collier
Republican January 3, 1957 –
January 3, 1973
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
Elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Redistricted to the 6th district.
 
Samuel H. Young
Republican January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 1975
93rd Elected in 1972.
Lost re-election.
 
Abner Mikva
Democratic January 3, 1975 –
September 26, 1979
94th
95th
96th
Elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Resigned to become judge of U.S. Court of Appeals.
Vacant September 26, 1979 –
January 22, 1980
96th
 
John Edward Porter
Republican January 22, 1980 –
January 3, 2001
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
Elected to finish Mikva's term.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Retired.
 
Mark Kirk
Republican January 3, 2001 –
November 29, 2010
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
Elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Retired to run for U.S. senator, and then resigned when elected.
Vacant November 29, 2010 –
January 3, 2011
111th
 
Bob Dold
Republican January 3, 2011 –
January 3, 2013
112th Elected in 2010.
Lost re-election.
 
Brad Schneider
Democratic January 3, 2013 –
January 3, 2015
113th Elected in 2012.
Lost re-election.
 
Bob Dold
Republican January 3, 2015 –
January 3, 2017
114th Elected in 2014.
Lost re-election.
 
Brad Schneider
Democratic January 3, 2017 –
Present
115th
116th
117th
Elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.

Historical district boundariesEdit

 
2003 - 2013

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP), US Census Bureau. "My Congressional District". www.census.gov. Retrieved January 17, 2019.
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d Barone, Michael; McCutcheon, Chuck (2013). The Almanac of American Politics 2014. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. pp. 577–578. ISBN 978-0-226-10544-4. Copyright National Journal.
  4. ^ Illinois Congressional District 10, Illinois Board of Elections
  5. ^ "David J. Kalbfleisch for U.S. House, IL-10 in 2010". Archived from the original on August 20, 2008. Retrieved February 16, 2014.
  6. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20090813090041/http://www.pioneerlocal.com/evanston/news/1001476%2Cpp-greenparty-061208-s1.article. Archived from the original on August 13, 2009. Retrieved January 20, 2008. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  7. ^ "Allan Stevo for Congress". Archived from the original on October 20, 2008. Retrieved February 16, 2014.
  8. ^ "General Election of November 2, 2010" (PDF). Illinois State Board of Elections. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 6, 2011. Retrieved February 1, 2014.
  9. ^ McKinney, Dave; Sweet, Lynn; Pallasch, Abdon M. (May 28, 2011). "Illinois Democrats target GOP with redrawing of congressional map". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved May 28, 2011.
  10. ^ Sadin, Steve (June 2, 2011). "Dold Will Run in Remapped 10th". Libertyville Patch. Retrieved June 26, 2011.
  11. ^ "Waukegan Dem announces bid for congressional seat". WALS-TV. April 28, 2011. Retrieved April 28, 2011.[permanent dead link]
  12. ^ Sweet, Lynn (May 25, 2011). "Brad Schneider running in Illinois 10 Democratic primary". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on June 2, 2011. Retrieved May 25, 2011.
  13. ^ "Long Grove man enters 10th Democratic race". Daily Herald. November 10, 2011. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  14. ^ "Third democrat enters 10th congressional race". Buffalo Grove Patch. September 19, 2011. Retrieved November 15, 2011.
  15. ^ Schneider survives in 10th district Dem primary, Chicago Sun-Times, March 20, 2012.
  16. ^ "2012 General Election Official Vote Totals" (PDF). Illinois State Board of Elections. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 19, 2013. Retrieved March 26, 2012.
  17. ^ "Illinois General Election 2014". Illinois State Board of Elections. November 4, 2014. Retrieved December 18, 2014.
  18. ^ "Illinois' 10th Congressional District election, 2016". Ballotpedia. Retrieved January 17, 2019.
  19. ^ "Illinois General Election 2016". Illinois State Board of Elections. November 8, 2016. Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved December 13, 2016.
  20. ^ The Washington Post
  21. ^ "Daily Herald - Suburban Chicago's Information Source". Daily Herald. Retrieved January 17, 2019.
  22. ^ Pearson, Rick. "Republican Dold won't seek 4th rematch for Congress with Democrat Schneider". chicagotribune.com. Retrieved January 17, 2019.
  23. ^ Times, The New York (March 20, 2018). "Illinois Primary Election Results". Retrieved January 17, 2019 – via NYTimes.com.
  24. ^ "2018 General Election Official Vote Totals Book".
  25. ^ "Schneider has commanding fundraising lead in 10th District congressional race". October 20, 2019.
  26. ^ Wang, Andrew [@WangCongress] (December 2, 2019). ".@rlissau @adambroad2020" (Tweet). Retrieved December 3, 2019 – via Twitter.
  27. ^ "Primary challenger to U.S. Rep. Brad Schneider now plans to run as a write-in following challenge to his nominating petition".
  28. ^ "Error Display".
  29. ^ "Illinois Election Results: 10th Congressional District". The New York Times. November 3, 2020.
  30. ^ "Election Results 2020 GENERAL ELECTION". Illinois State Board of Elections. December 4, 2020. Retrieved December 4, 2020.
  31. ^ "Illinois 2020 Election Results". Chicago Sun-Times. November 20, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 42°16′47″N 87°56′21″W / 42.27972°N 87.93917°W / 42.27972; -87.93917