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Chicago (/ʃɪˈkɑːɡ/ (About this sound listen), locally also /-ˈkɔː-/), officially the City of Chicago, on Lake Michigan in Illinois, is one of the largest cities in the United States. As of the 2017 census-estimated population of 2,716,450, Chicago is the third most populous city in the United States after New York and Los Angeles, and the most populous city in both the state of Illinois and the Midwestern United States. It is the county seat of Cook County. Chicago is the principal city of the Chicago metropolitan area, often referred to as "Chicagoland." The Chicago metropolitan area has nearly 10 million people, is the third-largest in the United States of America, fourth largest in North America, and the third largest in the world by urban landmass. The city is also the birthplace of the skyscraper, and considered the most influential architectural city of the 20th century. Chicago saw the creation of the first standardized futures contracts at the Chicago Board of Trade; today its successor has evolved into the largest and most diverse derivatives market in the world, generating 20% of all volume in commodities and financial futures.

Chicago was incorporated as a city in 1837 near a portage between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River watershed and grew rapidly in the mid-nineteenth century. After the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, which destroyed several square miles and left more than 100,000 homeless, the city made a concerted effort to rebuild. The construction boom accelerated population growth throughout the following decades, and by 1900 Chicago was one of the five largest cities in the world. During this period, Chicago made noted contributions to urban planning and zoning standards, which included creating new construction styles (including the Chicago School of architecture), the development of the City Beautiful Movement, and the steel-framed skyscraper.

Positioned along Lake Michigan, the city is an international hub for finance, commerce, industry, technology, telecommunications, and transportation. O'Hare International Airport is the one of the busiest airports in the world, and the region also has the largest number of U.S. highways and railroad freight. In 2012, Chicago was listed as an alpha global city by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network, and it ranked seventh in the entire world in the 2017 Global Cities Index. Chicago has the fourth-largest gross metropolitan product in the world—about $670.5 billion according to September 2017 estimates—ranking it after the metropolitan areas of Tokyo, New York City, and Los Angeles, and ranking ahead of London and Paris. The city has one of the world's largest and most diversified and balanced economies not dependent on any one industry, with no single industry employing more than 14% of the workforce.

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Hyde Park Township, Cook County, Illinois
Hyde Park Township, Cook County, Illinois is a former civil township in Cook County, Illinois, United States that existed as a separate municipality from 1861 until 1889 when it was annexed into the city of Chicago. Its borders are Pershing Road (formerly 39th Street) on the north, State Street on the west, Lake Michigan and the Indiana state line on the east, and 138th Street and the Calumet River on the south (see map in footnote). This region comprised most of what are now known as the South Side of Chicago including the entirety of the following community areas: Hyde Park, Kenwood, Woodlawn, South Shore, South Chicago, East Side, Hegewisch, Avalon Park, Calumet Heights, South Deering, Burnside, Pullman, and Riverdale as well as the Southern part of Oakland and the eastern parts of Grand Boulevard, Washington Park, Greater Grand Crossing, Chatham, Roseland, and West Pullman. During its brief history it developed from unpopulated wildlife to a largely developed residential, commercial and resort community. However, due to infrastructure limitations, legislative incentives and the lure of better municipal services it, along with numerous adjoining townships, agreed to be annexed into the city of Chicago, creating the largest city in the United States at that time.

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Sears Tower

This list of tallest buildings in Chicago ranks skyscrapers in the U.S. city of Chicago, Illinois by height. The tallest building in Chicago is the 108-story Sears Tower, which rises 1,451 feet (442 m) in the Chicago Loop and was completed in 1974. It also stands as the second tallest building in the United States, and the fifth-tallest building in the world. In addition, the Sears Tower has the most floors of any completed building in the world, and stands as the world's tallest completed skyscraper when measuring to pinnacle height, rising 1,730 feet (527 m) with the addition of its western antenna. The second- and third-tallest buildings in Chicago are the Aon Center and the John Hancock Center, respectively. As of June 2008, the John Hancock Center, with 49 floors of condominiums, holds the world record for the highest residence. In addition, Chicago has the distinction of being the only city in the world with more than one completed building containing at least 100 floors. (Read more...)

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Jimmy Lavender
James Sanford "Jimmy" Lavender (1884 – 1960) was an American professional baseball player who played in Major League Baseball as a pitcher from 1912 to 1917. He played a total of five seasons with the Chicago Cubs of the National League from 1912 to 1916; after being traded to the Philadelphia Phillies, he played an additional season in 1917. During his playing days, his height was listed at 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m), his weight as 165 pounds (75 kg), and he batted and threw right-handed. Born in Barnesville, Georgia, he began his professional baseball career in minor league baseball in 1906 at the age 22. He worked his way through the system over the next few seasons, culminating with a three-season stint with the Providence Grays of the Eastern League from 1909 to 1911. Lavender primarily threw the spitball, and used it to win 16 games as a 28-year-old rookie in 1912. In July 1912, he defeated Rube Marquard, ending Marquard's consecutive win streak at 19 games, which at the time tied the record for the longest win streak for a pitcher in MLB history. Lavender's early success as a rookie soon turned to mediocrity as his career progressed, winning no more than 11 games in any season afterward. On August 31, 1915, he threw a no-hitter against the New York Giants. He was traded to the Phillies before the 1917 season, and he played one season for the team, winning six games before retiring from major league baseball. Lavender returned to Georgia, worked on his farm in Montezuma, Georgia, and played professional baseball in an independent league. He died in Cartersville, Georgia at the age of 75.

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Norman Mailer
"Chicago was a town where nobody could forget how the money was made. It was picked up from floors still slippery with blood." — Norman Mailer

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Marshall Field and Company Building
The Marshall Field and Company Building, which now houses Macy's at State Street in Chicago, Illinois, was built in 1891-1892, and was the flagship location of the Marshall Field and Company and Marshall Field's chain of department stores. Since 2006, it is the main Chicago mid-western location of the Macy's department stores. The building is located in the Chicago "Loop" area of the downtown central business district in Cook County, Illinois, U.S.A., and it takes up the entire city block bounded clockwise from the west by North State Street, East Randolph Street, North Wabash Avenue, and East Washington Street.

Marshall Field's established numerous important business "firsts" in this building and in a long series of previous elaborate decorative structures on this site for the last century and a half, and it is regarded as one of the three most influential establishments in the nationwide development of the department store and in the commercial business economic history of the United States. Both the building name and the name of the stores formerly headquartered at this building changed names on September 9, 2006 as a result of the merger of the previous May's Department Stores (Marshall Field's former owner and parent) with the Federated Department Stores which led to the integration of the Marshall Field's stores into the Macy's now nationwide retailing network.

The building, which is the third largest store in the world, was both declared a National Historic Landmark and listed on the National Register of Historic Places on June 2, 1978, and it was designated a Chicago Landmark on November 1, 2005. The building architecture is known for its multiple atria (several balconied atrium - "Great Hall") and for having been built in stages over the course of more than two decades. Its ornamentation includes a Louis Comfort Tiffany, (1848-1933), (later Tiffany & Co. studios of New York City) mosaic vaulted ceiling and a pair of well-known outdoor street-corner clocks at State and Washington, and later at State and Randolph Streets, which serve as symbols of the store since 1897.

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  • Crown Fountain

...that Chicago's Crown Fountain (pictured) displays LED images of faces, which typically create the illusion of puckered lips spouting water?

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