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Introduction

Indiana is the 19th U.S. state and is located in the Midwest region of the United States of America. With over six million residents, it is ranked 15th in population and 17th in population density. It is 38th in land area. Indiana is bounded on the north by Lake Michigan and the state of Michigan; on the east by Ohio; on the south by Kentucky, with which it shares the Ohio River as a border; and on the west by Illinois. Indiana is one of the Great Lakes states. As of 2006, Indiana has an estimated population of 6,313,520, which is an increase of 47,501, or 0.8%, from the prior year and an increase of 233,003, or 3.8%, since the year 2000. The total gross state product in 2005 was US$214 billion in 2000 chained dollars. Indiana's per capita income, as of 2005, was US$31,150. The Calumet region of northwest Indiana is the largest steel producing area in the U.S.

Indiana is a diverse state with a few large urban areas and a number of smaller industrial cities. It is best known for the Indianapolis 500 American automobile race, held annually over the Memorial Day weekend, and a strong basketball tradition, often called Hoosier Hysteria. Residents of Indiana are called Hoosiers. The state's name means "Land of the Indians" and Angel Mounds State Historic Site, one of the best preserved prehistoric Native American sites in the United States, can be found in southern Indiana.

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Reno Gange
The Reno Brothers Gang, was a group of criminals from Rockport, Indiana, and the first outlaw brotherhood in the United States. The gang was led by Frank Reno (pictured) and operated in the Midwestern United States during and just after the American Civil War. Though short-lived, they carried out the first three peacetime train robberies in U.S. history. Most of the stolen money was never recovered.

The gang was hunted and captured by the Pinkerton Detective Agency until all its members were captured. The gang was broken after two lynchings incidents that by vigilante mobs in 1868 that killed ten of the members at Hangman Crossing and New Albany. The murders created an international diplomatic incident with Canada and Great Britain, a general public uproar, and international newspaper coverage. No one was ever identified or prosecuted for the crimes.

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Ryan White at a fundraiser in 1989
Ryan Wayne White (December 6, 1971 – April 8, 1990) was a young man from Kokomo, Indiana who became a national poster child for HIV/AIDS, after being expelled from school because of his infection. A hemophiliac, he became infected with HIV from a tainted blood treatment and, when diagnosed in 1984, was given six months to live. Though doctors said he posed no risk to other students, AIDS was poorly understood at the time and when White tried to return to school, many parents and teachers in Kokomo rallied against him. A lengthy legal battle with the school system ensued, and media coverage of the struggle made White into a national celebrity and spokesman for AIDS research and public education. He appeared frequently in the media with celebrities such as singer Elton John, pop star Michael Jackson and talk show host Phil Donahue. Surprising his doctors, White lived five years longer than predicted and died shortly before completing high school in April 1990.

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Gary is the largest city in Lake County, Indiana, USA. The city is located in the southeastern portion of Chicagoland and is approximately 25 miles from downtown Chicago. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 102,746 and is the largest Indiana city that is not a county seat. The city sits on the southern end of the former lake bed of the prehistoric Lake Chicago, and the current Lake Michigan. Most of the city's soil nearly one foot below the surface is pure sand. The city was founded in 1906 by the United States Steel Corporation as the home for its new plant, and named after the chairman of U.S. Steel, Elbert H. Gary.

State facts

The State of Indiana
Flag of Indiana State seal of Indiana
Flag of Indiana Seal
Nickname(s):
The Hoosier State
Motto(s): The Crossroads of America
Map of the United States with Indiana highlighted
Official languageEnglish
CapitalIndianapolis
Largest cityIndianapolis
Largest metroIndianapolis-Carmel MSA
AreaRanked 38th
 • Total36,418 sq mi
(94,321 km2)
 • Width140 miles (225 km)
 • Length270 miles (435 km)
 • % water1.5
 • Latitude37° 46′ N to 41° 46′ N
 • Longitude84° 47′ W to 88° 6′ W
PopulationRanked 15th
 • Total6,080,485
 • Density169.5/sq mi  (65.46/km2)
Ranked 16th
Elevation
 • Highest pointHoosier Hill[1]
1,257 ft (383 m)
 • Mean689 ft  (210 m)
 • Lowest pointOhio River[1]
320 ft (98 m)
Admitted to the UnionDecember 11, 1816 (19th)
GovernorEric Holcomb (R) (2017)
Lieutenant GovernorSuzanne Crouch (R) (2017)
LegislatureIndiana General Assembly
 • Upper houseSenate
 • Lower houseHouse of Representatives
U.S. SenatorsJoe Donnelly (D)
Todd Young (R)
U.S. House delegationList
Time zones 
 • 80 countiesEastern UTC-5/-4
 • 12 counties in
Evansville and
Gary Metro Areas
Central: UTC-6/-5
ISO 3166US-IN
AbbreviationsIN
Websitewww.in.gov

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Thomas Riley Marshall
Money will accomplish much in business, love and war but it isn't worth a cent in nature.... You could take the golden eagles of America and put them in the alfalfa fields of Indiana and you would not get a single blade more of grass.

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Coordinates: 40°N 86°W / 40°N 86°W / 40; -86

  1. ^ a b "Elevations and Distances in the United States". U.S Geological Survey. 29 April 2005. Retrieved 2006-11-06.