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Lake County, Indiana

Lake County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. In 2010, its population was 496,005,[10] making it Indiana's second-most populous county. The county seat is Crown Point.[11]

Lake County, Indiana
Former Lake County Courthouse in Crown Point, Indiana
Former Lake County Courthouse
in Crown Point, Indiana
Official seal of Lake County, Indiana
Seal
Location in the state of Indiana
Location in the state of Indiana
Indiana's location in the U.S.
Indiana's location in the U.S.
Coordinates: 41°25′N 87°22′W / 41.417°N 87.367°W / 41.417; -87.367Coordinates: 41°25′N 87°22′W / 41.417°N 87.367°W / 41.417; -87.367
Country United States
State Indiana
RegionNorthwest Indiana
Metro areaChicago Metropolitan
SettledOctober 1834[1]
EstablishedFebruary 16, 1837[2]
Named forLake Michigan
County seatCrown Point
Largest city Hammond (population)
 Gary (total area)
Incorporated
municipalities
Government
 • TypeCounty
 • BodyBoard of Commissioners
 • CommissionerKyle W. Allen, Sr. (D, 1st)
 • CommissionerJerry J. Tippy (R, 2nd)
 • CommissionerMichael C. Repay (D, 3rd)
 • County Council
Area
 • County626.5 sq mi (1,623 km2)
 • Land498.9 sq mi (1,292 km2)
 • Water127.6 sq mi (330 km2)
 • Metro
10,874 sq mi (28,160 km2)
Area rank12th largest county in Indiana
 • Region2,726 sq mi (7,060 km2)
Dimensions
 • Length36 mi (58 km)
 • Width16 mi (26 km)
Elevation
[5] (mean)
663 ft (202 m)
Highest elevation
[6] – NE Winfield Twp
801 ft (244 m)
Lowest elevation
[7] – at Lake Michigan
585 ft (178 m)
Population
 • County496,005
 • Estimate 
(2016)
485,846
 • Rank2nd largest county in Indiana 131st largest county in U.S.[8]
 • Density994/sq mi (384/km2)
 • Metro
9,522,434
 • Region
819,537
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (Central)
ZIP Codes
46303, 46307-08, 46311-12, 46319-25, 46327, 46341-42, 46355-56, 46373, 46375-77, 46394, 46401-11
Area code219
Congressional district1st
Indiana Senate districts1st, 2nd, 3rd and 6th
Indiana House of Representatives districts1st, 2nd, 3rd, 11th, 12th, 14th, 15th and 19th
FIPS code18-089
GNIS feature ID0450495
InterstatesI-65.svg I-80.svg Indiana Toll Road logo 1968.svg I-90.svg I-94.svg
U.S. RoutesUS 6.svg US 12.svg US 20.svg US 30.svg US 41.svg US 231.svg
State RoutesIndiana 2.svg Indiana 51.svg Indiana 53.svg Indiana 55.svg
Indiana 130.svg Indiana 152.svg Indiana 312.svg Indiana 912.svg
AirportsGary/Chicago International
Griffith-Merrillville
WaterwaysGrand Calumet River
Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal
Kankakee River
Lake Michigan
Amtrak stationsDyerHammond-Whiting
South Shore Line stationsHammondEast Chicago
Adam Benjamin Metro Center
Gary/Chicago AirportMiller
Public transitEast Chicago Transit
Gary Public Transportation
Websitewww.lakecountyin.org
  • Indiana county number 45
  • Second most-populous county in Indiana
Demographics (2010)[9]
White Black Asian
64.4% 25.9% 1.2%
Islander Native Other Hispanic
(any race)
0.0% 0.3% 8.2% 16.7%

This county is part of Northwest Indiana and the Chicago metropolitan area, and contains a mix of urban, suburban and rural areas.

It is the home to a portion of the Indiana Dunes[12][13] and to Marktown, Clayton Mark's planned worker community in East Chicago.[14]

Contents

HistoryEdit

Early settlementEdit

Originally inhabited by Potawatomi tribes, Lake County was established on February 16, 1837.[2] From 1832 to 1836 the area that was to become Lake County was part of La Porte County.[15] From 1836 to 1837 it was part of Porter County.[15] It was named for its location on Lake Michigan.[16] The original county seat was Liverpool until Lake Court House, which later became Crown Point, was chosen in 1840.[17] Lake County's population grew slowly before the 1850s, when the railroads arrived to link Chicago to the rest of the country, and enabled tens of thousands of settlers and immigrants to buy land. Small-scale industrialization began, but was primarily relegated to the northern coast of the county. The 1900 Census gives a population of 37,892 residents.

Industrialization and immigrationEdit

The arrival of Inland Steel Company to East Chicago in 1903 and U.S. Steel to Gary in 1906 jump-started the county's population explosion. Immigrants poured into the area from all over Central and Eastern Europe (supplemented by a small Mexican immigrant community) and from many regions of the United States, such as Appalachia and the South. By 1930, Lake County's population surpassed 260,000, with first- and second-generation Americans constituting a majority of the population. Like the rest of Indiana, the Ku Klux Klan gained a large following in the 1920s in response to changing demographics. While the steel industry reigned supreme, other industries also found the County to be an ideal location for cheap land and well-developed transportation networks, such as automobiles, oil, chemicals, consumer goods, food processing, and construction supply companies.[18]

The Great Depression was devastating to Lake County, as it was to any other area that relied on heavy industry. The Depression, combined with industrial strife, changing demographics, and unionization, caused Lake County to become a stronghold of the Democratic Party; Lake County has supported the Democratic nominee for President in every election since 1932 (exceptions occurred in 1956 and 1972), and Indiana's 1st Congressional District has remained in the Democratic column in every election since 1930. World War II restored prosperity, as industry revived to support the war effort, and good economic times continued into the 1970s. More immigrants were attracted by the promise of middle-class industrial jobs, and in addition to refugees and immigrants from Europe, black Americans and Mexicans also arrived in even larger numbers than they had in the 1910-1930 period. As minority populations exploded in industrial cities like East Chicago and Gary, racial tensions surfaced once again, and white flight from the industrial cities took place, aided in large part by the construction of state and federal highways.[18]

Recent historyEdit

Lake County's population peaked at 546,000 in 1970. Severe industrial decline took place during the 1973 - 1991 period, brought on by foreign competition, new management philosophies that called for major workforce reductions, and productivity gains from technology. The decline was particularly intense in the steel industry: steel employment exceeded 60,000 in the 1960s, and declined progressively to just 18,000 by 2015. Lake County's population declined 13% to bottom out at 475,000 in 1990.

The industrial decline of the 1980s cast a long shadow over Lake County: the county did not regain the level of employment it had in 1980 until 1996, after which the employment level roughly flatlined. The county's economic output peaked in 1978, and has not since recovered, remaining 15-20% below the peak after adjusting for inflation. As prosperity declined, so did the immigration that powered the County's explosive population growth before 1950: per the 2000 Census, only 5.3% of Lake County's residents were foreign-born, compared to over 11% for the United States as a whole.[19]

However, the population recovered somewhat during the 1990s and 2000s, as the local economy adjusted. Suburban growth has also been driven by commuter populations of workers who are employed in Chicago and commute via expressways or the South Shore Line. In 2007, it was estimated that 44,000 workers commuted from Lake County, Indiana to Chicago for work.[19]The decline of industrial cities and growth of suburbs has been so sharp, that by 1990 a majority of the County's population lived outside of the four traditional industrial cities. Lake County still continues to struggle with urban decline and poverty, suburban sprawl and traffic jams, and a stagnating population.[18]

GeographyEdit

According to the 2010 census, the county has a total area of 626.56 square miles (1,622.8 km2), of which 498.96 square miles (1,292.3 km2) (or 79.63%) is land and 127.60 square miles (330.5 km2) (or 20.37%) is water.[20]

The northern and southern portions of the county (north of U.S. 30 and south of Lowell) are mainly low and flat, except for a few sand ridges and dunes and were both once very marshy and had to be drained. The lowest point, at 585 feet (178 m),[7] is along the Lake Michigan shoreline.

The central part of the county is higher and hillier. As you travel south from the low and relatively flat lake plain in the northern part of the county, the land gradually rises in elevation until the peak of the Valparaiso Moraine. The highest point, at 801 feet (244 m),[6] is in northeastern Winfield Township near 109th Street and North Lakeshore Drive in Lakes of the Four Seasons. From here the land descends south into the Kankakee Outwash Plain until the Kankakee River is reached.

The geographic center of Lake County is approximately 200 feet (61 m) northwest of Burr Street and West 113th Avenue in Center Township 41°24′53.8″N 87°24′14.3″W / 41.414944°N 87.403972°W / 41.414944; -87.403972.

National protected areaEdit

AirportsEdit

Major highwaysEdit

Interstate 65 in Lake County is called the Casimir Pulaski Memorial Highway. Interstate 80/94/US 6 is the Frank Borman Expressway from the Illinois state line east to the Indiana Toll Road interchange in the eastern portion of the county. Interstate 94 has been referred to as the Chicago-Detroit Industrial Freeway. US 6 is part of the Grand Army of the Republic Highway. Broadway (Indiana 53) is also the Carolyn Mosby Memorial Highway. Indiana 51 is known for its entire length as the Adam Benjamin Memorial Highway. US 30 is part of the historic Lincoln Highway. US 12 from Gary eastward is part of Dunes Highway. Cline Avenue (Indiana 912) from US 12 north and westward is known as the Highway Construction Workers Memorial Highway.

RailroadsEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

MunicipalitiesEdit

Lakes of the Four Seasons, IndianaSchneider, IndianaSt. John, IndianaCrown Point, IndianaHobart, IndianaLowell, IndianaLake Dalecarlia, IndianaCedar Lake, IndianaDyer, IndianaWinfield, IndianaGary, IndianaMerrillville, IndianaLake Station, IndianaNew Chicago, IndianaGriffith, IndianaSchererville, IndianaMunster, IndianaEast Chicago, IndianaHammond, IndianaWhiting, IndianaHighland, Lake County, Indiana 

The municipalities in Lake County, and their populations as of the 2010 Census, are:

CitiesEdit

TownsEdit

Census-designated placesEdit

Unincorporated communitiesEdit

TownshipsEdit

The 11 townships of Lake County, with their populations as of the 2010 Census, are:

EconomyEdit

Despite the decline of heavy industry, manufacturing was still the largest employment sector in Lake County in 2010 with over 45,000 workers employed, followed closely by healthcare and social assistance at 44,000 workers, public administration at 40,000 workers, retail trade at 37,000 workers, accommodation and food services at 25,000 workers, and construction at 15,000 workers.[19]

Lake County's GDP in 2010 was measured at nearly $25 billion. Manufacturing was also the largest sector of the economy in economic terms, contributing over $5.8 billion to the county's GDP in 2010. It was followed by healthcare and social assistance at $2.6 billion, public administration at $2.5 billion, and retail trade at $1.9 billion. While Lake County's average income was approximately 24% higher than the national average in 1978, in 2010 Lake County had fallen significantly behind the United States as a whole, with average income being approximately 12.9% lower. The national average surpassed Lake County sometime around 1986.

Businesses with the largest number of employees in the county are: [21]


EducationEdit

Public school districtsEdit

The administration of public schools in Lake County is divided among 16 corporations and governing bodies, more than any other Indiana county.[22]

Private schoolsEdit

Elementary and secondary schools operated by the Diocese of Gary:

  • Andrean High School, Merrillville (9-12)
  • Aquinas School at St. Andrew's, Merrillville (PK-8)
  • Bishop Noll Institute, Hammond (9-12)
  • Our Lady of Grace, Highland (PK-8)
  • St. Casimir, Hammond (PK-8)
  • St. John Bosco, Hammond (PK-8)
  • St. John the Baptist, Whiting (PK-8)
  • St. John the Evangelist, St. John (PK-8)
  • St. Mary, Crown Point (PK-8)
  • St. Mary, Griffith (PK-8)
  • St. Michael, Schererville (PK-8)
  • St. Stanislaus, East Chicago (PK-8)
  • St. Thomas More, Munster (PK-8)

Other parochial and private schools:

  • St. Paul's Lutheran School, Munster (PK-8)
  • Trinity Lutheran School, Crown Point (PK-8)
  • Trinity Lutheran School, Hobart (PK-8)

Colleges and universitiesEdit

Public librariesEdit

The county is served by seven different public library systems:

  • Crown Point Community Library has its main location with a branch in Winfield.[24]
  • East Chicago Public Library has its main location and the Robart A. Pastrick branch.[25]
  • Gary Public Library has its main location, the Du Bois Library, as well as the Brunswick, Kennedy and Woodson branches.[26]
  • Hammond Public Library[27]
  • Lake County Public Library has its main location in Merrillville as well as Cedar Lake, Dyer-Schererville, Griffith-Calumet Township, Highland, Hobart, Lake Station-New Chicago, Munster and St. John branches.[28]
  • Lowell Public Library has its main location with branches in Schneider and Shelby.[29]
  • Whiting Public Library[30]

HospitalsEdit

MediaEdit

The Times, based in Munster, is the largest daily newspaper in Lake County and Northwest Indiana and the second largest in the state. Lake County is also served by the Post-Tribune, a daily newspaper based in Merrillville.

Lakeshore Public Television operates WYIN-TV Gary on channel 56 and is the local PBS station in the Chicago television market.

These eight broadcast radio stations serve Lake County and are part of the Chicago market:

  • WJOB (1230 AM) – Hammond
  • WWCA (1270 AM) – Gary
  • WLTH (1370 AM) – Gary
  • WLPR (89.1 FM) – Lowell
  • WRTW (90.5 FM) – Crown Point
  • WPWX (92.3 FM) – Hammond
  • WXRD (103.9 FM) – Crown Point
  • WZVN (107.1 FM) – Lowell

Climate and weatherEdit

Climate data for Lowell, Indiana (1981-2010 normals, extremes 1963-present)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 66
(19)
73
(23)
85
(29)
91
(33)
95
(35)
104
(40)
101
(38)
104
(40)
98
(37)
92
(33)
77
(25)
70
(21)
104
(40)
Average high °F (°C) 31.2
(−0.4)
35.8
(2.1)
47.5
(8.6)
60.8
(16)
71.3
(21.8)
80.7
(27.1)
83.8
(28.8)
82.0
(27.8)
76.4
(24.7)
63.6
(17.6)
49.4
(9.7)
35.1
(1.7)
59.8
(15.5)
Daily mean °F (°C) 22.8
(−5.1)
26.7
(−2.9)
37.4
(3)
49.3
(9.6)
59.8
(15.4)
69.7
(20.9)
73.1
(22.8)
71.1
(21.7)
64.2
(17.9)
51.9
(11.1)
40.2
(4.6)
27.1
(−2.7)
49.4
(9.7)
Average low °F (°C) 14.4
(−9.8)
17.7
(−7.9)
27.4
(−2.6)
37.9
(3.3)
48.2
(9)
58.7
(14.8)
62.4
(16.9)
60.3
(15.7)
52.0
(11.1)
40.2
(4.6)
31.0
(−0.6)
19.1
(−7.2)
39.1
(3.9)
Record low °F (°C) −28
(−33)
−23
(−31)
−9
(−23)
7
(−14)
26
(−3)
33
(1)
41
(5)
38
(3)
28
(−2)
18
(−8)
2
(−17)
−29
(−34)
−29
(−34)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 1.96
(49.8)
1.75
(44.4)
2.57
(65.3)
3.78
(96)
4.38
(111.3)
4.69
(119.1)
4
(100)
3.98
(101.1)
3.14
(79.8)
3.44
(87.4)
3.43
(87.1)
2.34
(59.4)
39.46
(1,000.7)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 8.8
(22.4)
8.2
(20.8)
3.4
(8.6)
0.3
(0.8)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.2
(0.5)
0.7
(1.8)
7.7
(19.6)
29.3
(74.5)
Source: NOAA (normals, 1981–2010)[37]
 
Satellite imagery of Lake County, IN

In recent years, average temperatures in Lowell have ranged from a low of 14.4 °F (−9.8 °C) in January to a high of 83.8 °F (28.8 °C) in July, although a record low of −29 °F (−34 °C) was recorded in December 1989 and a record high of 104 °F (40 °C) was recorded in June 1988. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 1.75 inches (44 mm) in February to 4.69 inches (119 mm) in June. Temperatures at or below 0 °F (−18 °C) occur on average 11 days annually and exceed 90 °F (32 °C) degrees on 14 days.[37] In winter, lake-effect snow increases snowfall totals compared to the areas to the west.[38] In spring and early summer, the immediate shoreline areas sometimes experience lake-breeze that can drop temperatures by several degrees compared to areas further inland.[39] In summer, thunderstorms are common, occurring an average 40–50 days every year,[40] and on about 13 days, these thunderstorms produce severe winds.[41]

GovernmentEdit

The county government is a constitutional body, and is granted specific powers by the Constitution of Indiana, and by the Indiana Code.

County Council: The county council is the legislative branch of the county government and controls all the spending and revenue collection in the county. Representatives are elected from county districts. The council members serve four-year terms. They are responsible for setting salaries, the annual budget, and special spending. The council also has limited authority to impose local taxes, in the form of an income and property tax that is subject to state level approval, excise taxes, and service taxes.[42][43]

Board of Commissioners: The executive body of the county is made of a board of commissioners. The commissioners are elected county-wide, in staggered terms, and each serves a four-year term. One of the commissioners, typically the most senior, serves as president. The commissioners are charged with executing the acts legislated by the council, collecting revenue, and managing the day-to-day functions of the county government.[42][43]

Court: The county maintains a small claims court that can handle some civil cases. The judge on the court is elected to a term of four years and must be a member of the Indiana Bar Association. The judge is assisted by a constable who is also elected to a four-year term. In some cases, court decisions can be appealed to the state level circuit court.[43]

County Officials: The county has several other elected offices, including sheriff, coroner, auditor, treasurer, recorder, surveyor, and circuit court clerk Each of these elected officers serves a term of four years and oversees a different part of county government. Members elected to county government positions are required to declare party affiliations and to be residents of the county.[43]

County elected officialsEdit

PoliticsEdit

Lake County has long been a Democratic stronghold, giving pluralities to Democrats in every Presidential election since 1932 with the exceptions of 1956 and 1972.

Lake is part of Indiana's 1st congressional district, which is held by Democrat Pete Visclosky.[45] In the State Senate, Lake is part of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 6th districts, which are held by three Democrats and one Republican. In the Indiana House of Representatives, Lake is part of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 11th, 12th, 14th, 15th and 19th districts, which are held by four Democrats and four Republicans.

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[46]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 37.3% 75,625 57.7% 116,935 5.1% 10,241
2012 33.9% 68,431 64.8% 130,897 1.4% 2,819
2008 32.4% 67,742 66.6% 139,301 1.0% 1,996
2004 38.2% 71,903 61.0% 114,743 0.7% 1,376
2000 36.0% 63,389 62.0% 109,078 2.0% 3,527
1996 29.2% 47,873 61.2% 100,198 9.6% 15,789
1992 28.9% 53,867 55.2% 102,778 15.9% 29,653
1988 43.0% 79,929 56.6% 105,026 0.4% 780
1984 44.3% 94,870 55.1% 117,984 0.6% 1,289
1980 46.0% 95,408 48.8% 101,145 5.2% 10,786
1976 42.4% 90,119 56.7% 120,700 0.9% 1,922
1972 56.2% 115,480 43.1% 88,510 0.7% 1,352
1968 36.5% 77,911 46.8% 99,897 16.7% 35,766
1964 35.2% 73,722 64.4% 134,978 0.4% 823
1960 37.0% 78,278 62.7% 132,554 0.3% 526
1956 52.0% 92,803 47.6% 85,000 0.4% 657
1952 44.7% 74,073 54.7% 90,721 0.6% 1,051
1948 38.8% 51,413 58.1% 77,025 3.1% 4,157
1944 38.8% 48,147 60.6% 75,066 0.6% 737
1940 38.8% 45,898 60.8% 71,985 0.4% 447
1936 32.5% 33,689 66.1% 68,551 1.5% 1,510
1932 46.6% 42,596 50.3% 46,060 3.1% 2,836
1928 59.7% 48,768 39.6% 32,321 0.8% 630
1924 64.6% 30,990 22.8% 10,918 12.6% 6,060
1920 69.2% 26,296 18.8% 7,136 12.1% 4,596
1916 55.0% 13,262 41.3% 9,946 3.8% 903
1912 29.6% 5,176 29.4% 5,136 41.0% 7,171
1908 61.0% 9,499 35.3% 5,502 3.7% 578
1904 64.1% 6,429 29.3% 2,933 6.6% 666
1900 58.0% 5,337 40.6% 3,733 1.4% 131
1896 58.1% 4,883 40.7% 3,418 1.2% 102
1892 48.0% 2,958 48.9% 3,010 3.1% 192
1888 54.2% 2,543 44.1% 2,068 1.7% 80

2008 presidential primaryEdit

In the 2008 Democratic presidential primary on May 6, 2008, Lake County was one of the last counties to report results.[47] Lake County had reported no results at 11 p.m. ET,[48] and at midnight ET, only 28% of Lake County's vote had been reported.[49] A large number of absentee ballots and a record turnout delayed the tallies, and polls closed an hour later than much of the state because Lake County is in the Central Time Zone.[48] Early returns showed Senator Barack Obama leading by a potentially lead-changing margin, leaving the race between Senator Hillary Clinton and Obama "too close to call" until final tallies were reported.

Culture and contemporary lifeEdit

Entertainment and the artsEdit

Major attractionsEdit

Professional sports teamsEdit

RecreationEdit

List of parks and recreational facilities – Lake County Parks and Recreation
  • Bellaboo's Play and Discovery Center – Lake Station
  • Buckley Homestead – Lowell
  • Cedar Creek Family Golf Center – Cedar Lake
  • Deep River County Park – Hobart
  • Deep River Waterpark – Crown Point
  • Gibson Woods Nature Preserve – Hammond
  • Grand Kankakee Marsh – Hebron
  • Lake Etta – Gary
  • Lemon Lake – Crown Point
  • Oak Ridge Prairie & Oak Savannah Trail – Griffith
  • Stoney Run County Park – Hebron
  • Three Rivers County Park – Lake Station
  • Turkey Creek Golf Course – Merrillville
  • Whihala Beach – Whiting
List of recreational facilities – Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
18401,468
18503,991171.9%
18609,145129.1%
187012,33934.9%
188015,09122.3%
189023,88658.3%
190037,89258.6%
191082,864118.7%
1920159,95793.0%
1930261,31063.4%
1940293,19512.2%
1950368,15225.6%
1960513,26939.4%
1970546,2536.4%
1980522,965−4.3%
1990475,594−9.1%
2000484,5641.9%
2010496,0052.4%
Est. 2016485,846[50]−2.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[51]
1790-1960[52] 1900-1990[53]
1990-2000[54] 2010-2013[10]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 496,005 people, 188,157 households, and 127,647 families residing in the county.[55] The population density was 994.1 inhabitants per square mile (383.8/km2). There were 208,750 housing units at an average density of 418.4 per square mile (161.5/km2).[20] The racial makeup of the county was 64.4% white, 25.9% black or African American, 1.2% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 5.8% from other races, and 2.4% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 16.7% of the population.[55] In terms of ancestry, 16.1% were German, 11.1% were Irish, 9.6% were Polish, 5.4% were English, and 3.7% were American.[56]

Of the 188,157 households, 34.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.7% were married couples living together, 17.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.2% were non-families, and 27.4% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.19. The median age was 37.4 years.[55]

The median income for a household in the county was $47,697 and the median income for a family was $58,931. Males had a median income of $50,137 versus $33,264 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,142. About 12.2% of families and 16.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.3% of those under age 18 and 8.4% of those age 65 or over.[57]

Places by population and race[9]
Place Population (2010) White Black or African
American
Asian Other
[note 1]
Hispanic or Latino
(of any race)
Lake County 496,005 64.4% 25.9% 1.2% 8.5% 16.7%
Cedar Lake, town 11,560 94.9% 0.5% 0.4% 4.2% 6.5%
Crown Point, city 27,317 88.2% 6.3% 1.8% 3.7% 8.1%
Dyer, town 16,390 90.1% 2.5% 2.9% 4.5% 9.3%
East Chicago, city 29,698 35.5% 42.9% 0.1% 21.5% 50.9%
Gary, city 80,294 10.7% 84.8% 0.2% 4.3% 5.1%
Griffith, town 16,893 75.8% 16.9% 0.8% 6.5% 13.3%
Hammond, city 80,830 59.4% 22.5% 1.0% 17.1% 34.1%
Highland, town 23,727 88.6% 4.2% 1.6% 5.6% 12.8%
Hobart, city 29,059 85.3% 7.0% 1.0% 6.7% 13.9%
Lake Dalecarlia, CDP 1,355 97.3% 0.2% 0.1% 2.4% 3.4%
Lake Station, city 12,572 79.7% 3.6% 0.3% 16.4% 28.0%
Lakes of the Four Seasons, CDP[note 2] 7,033 93.4% 1.2% 1.0% 4.4% 8.5%
Lowell, town 9,276 95.9% 0.5% 0.3% 3.3% 6.9%
Merrillville, town 35,246 46.4% 44.5% 1.2% 7.9% 12.9%
Munster, town 23,603 85.6% 3.5% 5.8% 5.1% 10.2%
New Chicago, town 2,035 81.0% 2.2% 0.7% 16.1% 27.4%
St. John, town 14,850 93.5% 1.3% 1.3% 3.9% 8.2%
Schererville, town 29,243 86.8% 5.4% 2.8% 5.0% 10.6%
Schneider, town 277 97.1% 0.0% 1.1% 1.8% 2.5%
Shelby, CDP 539 95.5% 1.7% 0.2% 2.6% 0.9%
Whiting, city 4,997 76.3% 3.5% 0.7% 19.5% 40.7%
Winfield, town 4,383 88.5% 3.7% 3.5% 4.3% 8.9%
Places by population and standard of living[58][59]
Place Population (2010) Per
capita
income
Median
household
income
Median
home
value
Lake County 496,005 $23,792 $49,315 $137,400
Cedar Lake, town 11,560 $25,477 $59,090 $151,400
Crown Point, city 27,317 $31,454 $64,876 $174,900
Dyer, town 16,390 $35,020 $78,881 $197,500
East Chicago, city 29,698 $13,457 $27,171 $86,800
Gary, city 80,294 $15,764 $26,956 $66,900
Griffith, town 16,893 $26,548 $53,225 $141,600
Hammond, city 80,830 $18,148 $38,677 $94,800
Highland, town 23,727 $30,036 $61,930 $155,200
Hobart, city 29,059 $24,740 $54,468 $134,400
Lake Dalecarlia, CDP 1,355 $25,035 $52,321 $165,400
Lake Station, city 12,572 $16,953 $36,955 $82,400
Lakes of the Four Seasons, CDP[note 2] 7,033 $32,908 $84,242 $182,600
Lowell, town 9,276 $23,619 $60,549 $146,500
Merrillville, town 35,246 $23,605 $53,470 $132,600
Munster, town 23,603 $34,735 $70,708 $197,600
New Chicago, town 2,035 $18,083 $38,672 $97,700
St. John, town 14,850 $36,490 $97,868 $254,600
Schererville, town 29,243 $33,984 $68,004 $204,300
Schneider, town 277 $18,774 $50,972 $89,500
Shelby, CDP 539 $29,700 $61,667 $89,700
Whiting, city 4,997 $21,427 $44,368 $111,500
Winfield, town 4,383 $23,792 $49,315 $137,400

See alsoEdit

BibliographyEdit

  • Forstall, Richard L. (editor) (1995). U. S. Population of States and Counties - 1790 Through 1990. National Technical Information Services (NTIS). ISBN 0-934213-48-8.
  • Schoon, Kenneth J. (2003). Calumet Beginnings: Ancient Shorelines and Settlements at the South End of Lake Michigan. Indiana University Press. ISBN 0-253-34218-X.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Other = Combined percentages for American Indian or Alaska Native; Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander; other races; and two or more races
  2. ^ a b Population is 3,936 within Lake County; 3,097 reside in Porter County

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit