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Minnesota's 1st congressional district

Minnesota's 1st congressional district extends across southern Minnesota from the border with South Dakota to the border with Wisconsin. The First District is primarily a rural district built on a strong history of agriculture, although this is changing rapidly due to strong population growth in Rochester and surrounding communities. The First District is also home to several of Minnesota's major mid-sized cities, including Rochester, Mankato, Winona, Austin, Owatonna, Albert Lea, New Ulm, and Worthington. This district is currently represented by Republican Jim Hagedorn of Blue Earth.

Minnesota's 1st congressional district
Minnesota US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
Minnesota's 1st congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Jim Hagedorn
RBlue Earth
Area13,322[1] sq mi (34,500 km2)
Distribution
  • 62.53[2]% urban
  • 37.47% rural
Population (2016)672,415[3]
Median income$61,310[4]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+5[5]
External image
THIS govtrack.us MAP, is a useful representation of the 1st CD's borders, based on Google Maps.

From early statehood until the latest redistricting after the 2000 census, the first district covered only southeast Minnesota. During the 20th century it was generally considered solidly Republican, though in recent years this is changing. In 2004, John Kerry received 48% of the vote in this Congressional district. Two years later, in 2006, Republican Representative Gil Gutknecht was defeated by Democrat Tim Walz. In March 2017, Walz announced that he would not run for reelection to Congress, and instead would run for governor of Minnesota. The district leans Republican with a CPVI of R + 5.[5]

Contents

List of members representing the districtEdit

Cong
ress
Representative Party Years Electoral history
District created March 4, 1861
37th Cyrus Aldrich Republican March 4, 1861 –
March 3, 1863
Redistricted from the at-large district.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
38th
39th
40th
 
William Windom
Republican March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1869
Redistricted from the 2nd district.
Retired.
41st  
Morton S. Wilkinson
Republican March 4, 1869 –
March 3, 1871
Lost renomination.
42nd
43rd
44th
45th
46th
47th
 
Mark H. Dunnell
Republican March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1883
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
48th
49th
 
Milo White
Republican March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1887
[Data unknown/missing.]
50th  
Thomas Wilson
Democratic March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1889
Lost re-election.
51st  
Mark H. Dunnell
Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1891
Lost re-election.
52nd William H. Harries Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
Lost re-election.
53rd
54th
55th
56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
 
James Albertus Tawney
Republican March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1911
Lost renomination.
61st
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
66th
67th
68th
 
Sydney Anderson
Republican March 4, 1911 –
March 3, 1925
Retired.
69th
70th
 
Allen J. Furlow
Republican March 4, 1925 –
March 3, 1929
Lost renomination.
71st
72nd
Victor Christgau Republican March 4, 1929 –
March 3, 1933
Lost renomination.
73rd District inactive, all representatives elected at-large. March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1935
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
 
August H. Andresen
Republican January 3, 1935 –
January 14, 1958
Died.
Vacant January 14, 1958 –
February 18, 1958
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
 
Al Quie
Republican February 18, 1958 –
January 3, 1979
Retired to run for Minnesota Governor.
96th
97th
 
Arlen Erdahl
Republican January 3, 1979 –
January 3, 1983
Lost renomination.
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
 
Tim Penny
Democratic–Farmer–Labor January 3, 1983 –
January 3, 1995
Retired.
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
 
Gil Gutknecht
Republican January 3, 1995 –
January 3, 2007
Lost re-election.
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
 
Tim Walz
Democratic–Farmer–Labor January 3, 2007 –
January 3, 2019
Elected in 2006.

Retired to run for Governor of Minnesota.
116th  
Jim Hagedorn
Republican January 3, 2019 –
Present
Elected in 2018.

Recent electionsEdit

2002Edit

2002 First Congressional District of Minnesota Elections
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Gil Gutknecht (Incumbent) 163,532 61 -
DFL Steve Andreasen 92,149 35 -
Green Gregory Mikkelson 9,954 4 -

2004Edit

2004 First Congressional District of Minnesota Elections
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Gil Gutknecht (Incumbent) 193,132 60 -1
DFL Leigh Pomeroy 115,088 35 -
Independence Gregory Mikkelson 15,569 5 -

2006Edit

2006 First Congressional District of Minnesota Elections
Party Candidate Votes % ±
DFL Tim Walz 141,622 53 -
Republican Gil Gutknecht (Incumbent) 126,487 47 -13

2008Edit

2008 First Congressional District of Minnesota Elections
Party Candidate Votes % ±
DFL Tim Walz (Incumbent) 207,748 62.5 +9.5
Republican Brian J. Davis 109,446 32.9 -
Independence Gregory Mikkelson 14,903 4.5 -

2010Edit

2010 First Congressional District of Minnesota Elections
Party Candidate Votes % ±
DFL Tim Walz (Incumbent) 122,390 49.4 -13.1
Republican Randy Demmer 109,261 44.1 +11.2
Independence Steven Wilson 13,243 5.3 +0.8

2012Edit

2012 First Congressional District of Minnesota Elections
Party Candidate Votes % ±
DFL Tim Walz (Incumbent) 193,211 57.5 +8.1
Republican Allen Quist 142,164 42.3 -1.8

2014Edit

2014 First Congressional District of Minnesota Elections
Party Candidate Votes % ±
DFL Tim Walz (Incumbent) 122,851 54.2 -3.3
Republican Jim Hagedorn 103,536 45.7 +3.4

2016Edit

2016 First Congressional District of Minnesota Elections
Party Candidate Votes % ±
DFL Tim Walz (Incumbent) 169,076 50.4 -3.8
Republican Jim Hagedorn 166,527 49.6 +3.9

2018Edit

2018 First Congressional District of Minnesota Elections
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Jim Hagedorn 146,202 50.1 +0.5
DFL Dan Feehan 144,891 49.7 -0.7

Election results from presidential racesEdit

Historical district boundariesEdit

 
2003 - 2013

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Minnesota congressional districts by urban and rural population and land area" (PDF). US Census Bureau. 2000. Retrieved 2007-04-02.
  2. ^ Geography, US Census Bureau. "Congressional Districts Relationship Files (state-based)". www.census.gov.  This article incorporates public domain material from this U.S government document.
  3. ^ Bureau, Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP), US Census. "My Congressional District". www.census.gov.
  4. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=27&cd=01
  5. ^ a b "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.

Coordinates: 43°53′56″N 93°42′42″W / 43.89889°N 93.71167°W / 43.89889; -93.71167