Oregon's 1st congressional district

Oregon's 1st congressional district is a congressional district located in the U.S state of Oregon. The district stretches from Portland's western suburbs and exurbs, to parts of the Oregon coast. The district includes the principal cities of Beaverton, Hillsboro, and Tigard, all located in the Portland metropolitan area. Geographically, the district is located in the northwest corner of Oregon. It includes Clatsop, Columbia, Washington, and Yamhill counties, and a portion of southwest Multnomah County in Portland.

Oregon's 1st congressional district
Oregon US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
Oregon's 1st congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Suzanne Bonamici
DBeaverton
Area2,941 sq mi (7,620 km2)
Distribution
  • 86.65% urban
  • 13.35% rural
Population (2019)858,875
Median household
income
$81,473[1]
Ethnicity
Occupation
Cook PVID+12[2]

The district has been represented by Democrat Suzanne Bonamici since 2012. Bonamici won a special election to replace David Wu, who resigned in the wake of accusations of sexual misconduct.[3][4]

Recent presidential electionsEdit

Election results from presidential races
Year Office Results
2000 President Gore 50 - 44%
2004 President Kerry 55 - 44%
2008 President Obama 61 - 36%
2012 President Obama 57 - 40%
2016 President Clinton 57 - 35%
2020 President Biden 63 - 34%

List of members representing the districtEdit

Member
(Residence)
Party Years Cong
ess
Electoral history
District created March 4, 1893
 
Binger Hermann
(Roseburg)
Republican March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1897
53rd
54th
Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1892.
Re-elected in 1894.
Resigned to become Commissioner of the General Land Office.
 
Thomas H. Tongue
(Hillsboro)
Republican March 4, 1897 –
January 11, 1903
55th
56th
57th
Elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902 but died before next term began.
Vacant January 11, 1903 –
June 1, 1903
57th
58th
 
Binger Hermann
(Roseburg)
Republican June 1, 1903 –
March 3, 1907
58th
59th
Elected to finish Tongue's term.
Re-elected in 1904.
Retired due to the Oregon land fraud scandal.
 
Willis C. Hawley
(Salem)
Republican March 4, 1907 –
March 3, 1933
60th
61st
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
66th
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
Elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Lost renomination.
 
James W. Mott
(Salem)
Republican March 4, 1933 –
November 12, 1945
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
79th
Elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Died.
Vacant November 12, 1945 –
January 18, 1946
79th
 
A. Walter Norblad
(Astoria, Stayton)
Republican January 18, 1946 –
September 20, 1964
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
Elected to finish Mott's term.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Died.
Vacant September 20, 1964 –
November 3, 1964
88th
 
Wendell Wyatt
(Astoria)
Republican November 3, 1964 –
January 3, 1975
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
Elected to finish Norblad's term.
Also elected to the next full term.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Retired.
 
Les AuCoin
(Forest Grove, Portland)
Democratic January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1993
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
Elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
 
Elizabeth Furse
(Helvetia)
Democratic January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 1999
103rd
104th
105th
Elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Retired.
 
David Wu
(Portland)
Democratic January 3, 1999 –
August 3, 2011
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
Elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Resigned due to sexual misconduct accusation.
Vacant August 3, 2011 –
January 31, 2012
112th
 
Suzanne Bonamici
(Beaverton)
Democratic January 31, 2012 –
present
112th
113th
114th
115th
116th
117th
Elected to finish Wu's term.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.

Recent election resultsEdit

Sources (official results only):

1996Edit

United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 1996: District 1
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Elizabeth Furse 144,588 51.90
Republican Bill Witt 126,146 45.28
Libertarian Richard Johnson 6,310 2.26
Socialist David Princ 1,146 0.41
Misc. Misc. 414 0.15
Democratic hold

1998Edit

United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 1998: District 1
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Wu 119,993 50.10
Republican Molly Bordonaro 112,827 47.11
Libertarian Michael De Paulo 4,218 1.76
Socialist John F. Hryciuk 2,224 0.93
Misc. Misc. 234 0.10
Democratic hold

2000Edit

United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2000: District 1
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Wu 176,902 58.28
Republican Charles Starr 115,303 37.99
Libertarian Beth A. King 10,858 3.58
Misc. Misc. 458 0.15
Democratic hold

2002Edit

United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2002: District 1
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Wu 149,215 62.69
Republican Jim Greenfield 80,917 33.99
Libertarian Beth A. King 7,639 3.21
Misc. Misc. 265 0.11
Democratic hold

2004Edit

United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2004: District 1
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Wu 203,771 57.51
Republican Goli Ameri 135,164 38.15
Constitution Dean Wolf 13,882 3.91
Misc. Misc. 1,521 0.43
Democratic hold

2006Edit

United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2006: District 1
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Wu 169,409 62.83
Republican Derrick Kitts 90,904 33.71
Libertarian Drake Davis 4,497 1.67
Democratic hold

2008Edit

United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2008: District 1
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Wu 237,567 72.6
Independent Joel Haugen 58,279 17.7
Constitution Scott Semrau 14,172 4.27
Libertarian H. Joe Tabor 10,992 3.31
Pacific Green Chris Henry 7,128 2.14
Misc. Misc. 4,110 1.23
Democratic hold

2010Edit

United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2010: District 1
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Wu 160,357 54.7
Republican Rob Cornilles 122,858 41.9
Constitution Don LaMunyon 3,855 1.32
Pacific Green Chris Henry 2,955 1.01
Libertarian H. Joe Tabor 2,492 0.85
Misc. Misc. 392 0.13
Democratic hold

2012 special electionEdit

A special election was held on January 31, 2012 to replace the most recent incumbent David Wu, who created a vacancy in the office with his resignation effective August 3, 2011. The winner of the election, Suzanne Bonamici, served the remainder of Wu's two-year term.

Oregon's 1st congressional district special election, 2012[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Suzanne Bonamici 111,570 53.82
Republican Rob Cornilles 81,985 39.55
Progressive Steven Reynolds 6,679 3.22
Libertarian James Foster 6,524 3.15
Misc. Misc. 527 0.25
Total votes 207,285 100.0
Democratic hold

2012Edit

United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2012: District 1[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Suzanne Bonamici 197,845 59.60
Republican Delinda Morgan 109,699 33.04
Progressive Steven Reynolds 15,009 4.52
Constitution Bob Ekstrom 8,919 2.69
Misc. Misc. 509 0.15
Total votes 331,980 100
Democratic hold

2014Edit

United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2014: District 1[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Suzanne Bonamici 160,038 57.31
Republican Jason Yates 96,245 34.47
Libertarian James Foster 11,213 4.02
Pacific Green Steven C. Reynolds 11,163 4.00
Misc. Misc. 594 0.20
Total votes 279,253 100
Democratic hold

2016Edit

United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2016: District 1[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Suzanne Bonamici 225,391 59.6
Republican Brian Heinrich 139,756 37
Libertarian Kyle Sheahan 12,357 3.2
Misc. Misc. 691 0.2
Turnout   57.7
Total votes 378,195 100
Democratic hold

2018Edit

United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2018: District 1[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Suzanne Bonamici 231,198 63.6
Republican John Verbeek 116,446 32.1
Libertarian Drew Layda 15,121 4.2
Misc. Misc. 484 0.1
Turnout   55.5
Total votes 363,249 100
Democratic hold

2020Edit

United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2020: District 1
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Suzanne Bonamici 297,071 64.6
Republican Christopher Christensen 161,928 35.2
Misc. Misc. 900 0.2
Turnout  
Total votes 459,899 100
Democratic hold

Historical district boundariesEdit

 
2003 - 2013

Following the 2000 United States Census, the district gained some of Multnomah County, which had previously been part of the 3rd district. After the 2010 United States Census, the district boundaries were changed to move Downtown Portland from the 1st to the 3rd district.[10][11]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Specific
  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=41&cd=01
  2. ^ "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  3. ^ "Wu special set for Jan. '12". Politico. August 4, 2011.
  4. ^ "Representative in Congress, 1st District". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved 31 January 2012.
  5. ^ "January 31, 2012, Special Election Official Results" (PDF). Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved November 2, 2018.
  6. ^ "November 6, 2012, General Election Abstract of Votes" (PDF). Oregon Elections Division. Retrieved December 5, 2012.
  7. ^ "Oregon 2014 General Election" (PDF). Oregon Secretary of State. November 4, 2014. Retrieved January 7, 2015.
  8. ^ "Oregon 2016 General Election" (PDF). Oregon Secretary of State. November 8, 2016. Retrieved January 25, 2019.
  9. ^ "Oregon 2018 General Election" (PDF). Oregon Secretary of State. November 6, 2018. Retrieved January 25, 2019.
  10. ^ Mapes, Jeff (June 29, 2011). "Oregon legislators reach agreement on congressional redistricting". The Oregonian. Retrieved July 27, 2011.
  11. ^ "Oregon's Congressional Districts (Senate Bill 990)" (PDF). Oregon Legislative Assembly. Retrieved July 27, 2011.
General

Coordinates: 45°30′N 123°12′W / 45.500°N 123.200°W / 45.500; -123.200