The 1550s decade ran from January 1, 1550, to December 31, 1559.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:
January 23, 1556: Shaanxi earthquake, devastation kills 830,000 in China.

EventsEdit

1550

January–JuneEdit

July–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1551Edit

January–JuneEdit

July–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

  • Qizilbash forces under the command of Tahmasp I raid and destroy the cave monastery of Vardzia in Georgia.
  • In Henan province, China, during the Ming dynasty, a severe frost in the spring destroys the winter wheat crop. Torrential rains in mid summer cause massive flooding of farmland and villages (by some accounts submerged in a metre of water). In the fall, a large tornado demolishes houses and flattens much of the buckwheat in the fields. Famine victims either flee, starve, or resort to cannibalism. This follows a series of natural disasters in Henan in the years 1528, 1531, 1539, and 1545.
  • In Slovakia, Guta (modern-day Kolárovo) receives town status.
  • Portugal founds a sugar colony at Bahia.
  • Juan de Betanzos begins to write his Narrative of the Incas.
  • The new edition of the Genevan psalter, Pseaumes octantetrois de David, is published, with Louis Bourgeois as supervising composer, including the first publication of the hymn tune known as the Old 100th.

1552Edit

 
Bartolomeo Eustachi completes his Tabulae anatomicae.

January–JuneEdit

July–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1553Edit

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1554Edit

January–JuneEdit

July–DecemberEdit

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1555Edit

January–JuneEdit

July–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1556Edit

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Date unknownEdit

1557Edit

January–JuneEdit

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Date unknownEdit

1558Edit

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July–DecemberEdit

UnknownEdit

1559Edit


January–JuneEdit

July–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

ReferencesEdit

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