Poland national football team

The Poland national football team (Polish: Reprezentacja Polski w piłce nożnej) represents Poland in men's international football competitions since their first match in 1921. They are known by the nicknames "The White-Red" and "The Eagles", symbolized by their coat of arms featuring a white eagle on a red background.

Poland
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Biało-czerwoni (The White-Red)
Orły (The Eagles)
AssociationPolski Związek Piłki Nożnej (PZPN)
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachMichał Probierz
CaptainRobert Lewandowski
Most capsRobert Lewandowski (146)
Top scorerRobert Lewandowski (82)
Home stadiumStadion Narodowy
Stadion Śląski
FIFA codePOL
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 30 Increase 1 (15 February 2024)[1]
Highest5 (August 2017)
Lowest78 (November 2013)
First international
 Hungary 1–0 Poland 
(Budapest, Hungary; 18 December 1921)
Biggest win
 Poland 10–0 San Marino 
(Kielce, Poland; 1 April 2009)
Biggest defeat
 Denmark 8–0 Poland 
(Copenhagen, Denmark; 26 June 1948)
World Cup
Appearances9 (first in 1938)
Best resultThird place (1974, 1982)
European Championship
Appearances4 (first in 2008)
Best resultQuarter-finals (2016)

Poland has competed in nine FIFA World Cups, with their first appearance being in 1938, where they were eliminated by Brazil. The country's best result was third place, which Poland won in 1974 and 1982; this era is regarded as the golden era of Polish international football. At the UEFA European Championship, Poland's best result was a quarter-final appearance at the 2016 tournament before losing to eventual champions Portugal. Overall, they have competed in four European Championships since their debut in 2008. They were co-hosts of the 2012 edition, along with Ukraine.

Overall, Poland's best ever result at an international football tournament was gold won at the 1972 Munich Olympics, along with winning the silver medal at the 1976 Montreal Olympics and at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics.

History edit

Before independence edit

The first Polish football clubs were Lechia Lwów (1903), Czarni Lwów (1903), Pogoń Lwów (1904), KS Cracovia (1906) and Wisła Kraków (1906). The Polish national federation, called the Polish Football Union (Polski Związek Piłki Nożnej, PZPN), was founded on 20 December 1919, in Kraków when 31 delegates elected Edward Cetnarowski as the first president. The PZPN joined FIFA in 1923 and UEFA in 1955.

In a similar fashion to other European states, football appeared in Poland in the late 19th century. In 1888 Prof. Henryk Jordan, a court physician of the Habsburgs and the pioneer of sports in Poland, opened a sports park in Kraków's Błonia, a large open space surrounding the demolished city walls of that town. The park, along with the Sokół society founded in 1867, became the main centres to promote sports and healthy living in Poland. It was Jordan who began promoting football as a healthy sport in the open air; some sources also credit him with bringing the first football to Poland from his travels to Brunswick in 1890.[4] Other sources[5] mention Dr. Edmund Cenar as the one to bring the first ball and the one to translate The Cambridge Rules and parts of the International Football Association Board regulations to Polish language.

On 14 July 1894 during the Second Sokół Jamboree in Lwów at the General National Exhibition a short football match was played between the Sokół members of Lwów and those from Kraków. It lasted only six minutes and was seen as a curiosity rather than a potentially popular sport. Nevertheless, it was the first recorded football match in Polish history.[a] The Lwów team won after Włodzimierz Chomicki scored the only goal - the first known goal in Polish history.

This match precipitated the popularity of the new sport in Poland. Initially the rules and regulations were very simplified, with the size of the field and the ball varying greatly. Despite being discouraged by many educational societies and the state authorities, the new sport gained extreme popularity among pupils of various gymnasiums in Galicia. The first football teams were formed and in 1903–1904, four Lwów-based gymnasiums formed their own sport clubs: the IV Gymnasium for Boys formed a club later renamed to Pogoń Lwów, while the pupils of the I and II State Schools formed the Sława Lwów club, later renamed to Czarni Lwów. In the same season the Lechia Lwów was also formed. It is uncertain which of the clubs was created first as they were initially poorly organised; however, the Czarni Lwów are usually credited as being the first Polish professional football team. The following year, the popularity of the sport spread to nearby Rzeszów where Resovia Rzeszów was formed, while in the German-held part of Poland, the 1. FC Katowice and Warta Poznań were formed.

On 6 June 1906 a representation of Lwów youth came to Kraków for a repeat match, this time composed of two already organised teams, the Czarni and the team of the IV Gymnasium. Kraków's representation was beaten in both meetings, 4–0 and 2–0 respectively. That summer the Buffalo Bill Wild West Show set up camp at Kraków's Błonia, right outside of the traditional playground area and Jordan's garden. On 5 August 1906 the team of the Kraków-based Jan Sobieski Gymnasium played a match against the British and American members of Buffalo Bill's troupe, winning 1–0. The only goal scored by Stanisław Szeligowski was also the first goal scored by a Polish team in an international meeting. The success led to the popularisation of football in Kraków and to creation of the first Kraków-based professional football team, KS Cracovia – initially composed primarily of students of the Jan Sobieski Gymnasium.[4] By the autumn of that year there were already 16 teams in Kraków, including Wisła Kraków. In 1911, a Kraków-based Union of Polish Football for Galicia was formed and entered the Austrian Football Association. The union inspired the creation of a number of teams.

After the outbreak of World War I, most of the Galician football players, many of them members of either Strzelec or Sokół, joined Piłsudski's Polish Legions. The unit, fighting alongside the Austro-Hungarian Army, fought mostly in various parts of Russian-held Poland, which led to popularisation of the new sport in other parts of partitioned Poland. Eventually, Poland regained its independence in 1918.

1919–1939 edit

 
Poland national team, 1924
 
Poland team that played Brazil at the 1938 FIFA World Cup

The first football federation was established on 25 June 1911 in Lwów as the Polish Football Union (Związek Polski Piłki Nożnej). After World War I, members of PFU established the Polish Football Federation (Polski Związek Piłki Nożnej) in Warsaw on 20 December 1919. Two years later, they appointed Hungarian-born Jesza Poszony as the first coach of the Polish national team. Poland played its first official international match on 18 December 1921 in Budapest, where the side lost to Hungary 1–0.[6] Their first international win came on 28 May 1922 when they took on Sweden in Stockholm and beat them 2–1. Józef Klotz scored the first-ever goal for the national football team in that game.[7][8][9][10][11] Poland qualified for their first World Cup in 1937 when they beat Yugoslavia 4–0 and lost 1–0 in the two qualifying matches and ensured their place in the 1938 World Cup in France.

During their debut in the World Cup, Poland played Brazil and sent them to extra time, only to lose 6–5. Ernest Wilimowski, who played for Ruch Chorzów at the time, scored four of Poland's five goals.

Poland played what would be their last international match before the outbreak of World War II against Hungary, the runners-up in the 1938 World Cup. Poland defeated Hungary 4–2.

1939–1945 edit

When the Wehrmacht invaded Poland in September 1939, all Polish institutions and associations were dissolved, including the Polish Football Association PZPN. The German occupying forces forbade Poles to organise football matches. Consequently, there was no national team.[12]

Nine former national players were murdered by the German occupying forces. Three of them were killed in Auschwitz: Marian Einbacher, Adam Knioła (both Warta Poznań) and Antoni Łyko (Wisła Kraków). Stefan Fryc (Cracovia) and Bronisław Makowski (Wisła Kraków), who were both active in the resistance, were killed in mass shootings. Four Jewish players were murdered in Jewish ghettos: Józef Klotz, Zygmunt Krumholz (both Jutrzenka Kraków), Leon Sperling (Cracovia) and Zygmunt Steuermann (Hasmonea Lwów), brother of actress and Hollywood screenwriter Salka Viertel.[13]

1946–1974 edit

 
Kazimierz Górski was head coach of the national team between 1971 and 1976.

On 11 June 1946, following the aftermath of World War II, Poland played their first international friendly match, a 3–1 defeat against Norway in Oslo. Poland's biggest success in the early years after the war was their victory against one of Europe's best at the time, Czechoslovakia. Poland defeated their southern neighbors 3–1.

Poland suffered the worst defeat in the team's history on 26 April 1948 with a 0–8 loss to Denmark in Copenhagen. 15 years later, they posted their second highest-ever victory in Szczecin when they defeated Norway 9–0 on 4 September 1963. The game marked the debut for Włodzimierz Lubański, who scored one goal in the game. Lubański became the all-time top scorer for Poland while playing from 1963 to 1980, scoring 48 goals in 75 appearances. The game remained their highest victory until the score was surpassed on 1 April 2009, when Poland defeated San Marino 10–0.

1974–1986 edit

For 1974 World Cup qualification, Poland qualified and eliminated England, who missed out on the World Cup for the first time since 1946.

 
Poland celebrates a victory over Brazil in the 1974 World Cup

In their opening match of the 1974 World Cup, Poland met Argentina. Within eight minutes Poland were up 2–0 as Grzegorz Lato opened the scoring in the seventh minute and just a minute later Andrzej Szarmach doubled the lead. In the 60th minute, Argentina cut the lead in half when Ramon Heredia scored. Two minutes later, however, Lato scored his second, which turned out to be the winning goal as Carlos Babington gave Argentina their second in the 66th. Poland won 3–2.

Poland thrashed Haiti 7–0 in their second game, with a hat-trick from Szarmach and two goals from Lato. In their final match of the group stage, Poland met Italy. Poland were already through to the second round but needed at least a draw to win the group. Poland defeated Italy 2–1, finishing at the top of the group. In the second round, Poland won 1–0 against Sweden, who had not conceded any goals in their first three matches. Lato scored the only goal of the game. In the next game, Yugoslavia conceded a penalty from Poland in the 24th minute, and Stanislav Karasi tied it up for Yugoslavia in the 43rd. Lato scored the winning goal.

Poland faced hosts West Germany in the rain; Gerd Müller scored the winning goal in the 76th minute for West Germany. The Poles eventually defeated Brazil in the third place match.

In 1978 World Cup qualifying, Poland denied Portugal their second World Cup appearance and their first in 12 years. In the World Cup, Grzegorz Lato scored the only goal against African side Tunisia in the second match. In the final first-round match Poland met Mexico, with a 3–1 win.

In the second round, Poland met three South American teams. In 1974, Poland had played and won against both Argentina and Brazil; both teams would get their revenge this time around. First, Argentina beat the Poles 2–0 with two goals from tournament top scorer Mario Kempes. Poland then defeated Peru 1–0 with a goal from Andrzej Szarmach. In Poland's last match of this World Cup, Brazil opened the scoring in the 12th minute on a goal from Nelinho. Even though Lato equalized one minute before half-time, it was not to be for Poland: two goals from Roberto in the 57th and 62nd minutes wrapped up a 3–1 win for Brazil.

 
Zbigniew Boniek, top scorer for Poland in the 1982 World Cup

On 29 November 1980, a dispute between players and technical staff began at a hotel in Warsaw, ending in the Okęcie Airport. Following the incident, several players of the Poland national team were banned from international duty, and Ryszard Kulesza resigned as head coach of the team.[14] At the 1982 FIFA World Cup, Poland were drawn in a group with Italy, Cameroon and Peru.[15] The first two games were consecutive 0–0 draws with Italy and Cameroon, but the final group game of the first round ended in a 5–1 win for Poland, meaning they would advance to the second round as group winners.[16][17][18]

In the first game of the second round, Poland beat Belgium 3–0 with a hat-trick from Boniek securing a classic performance in the match, though the player would receive a yellow card in the following game.[19][20] Nevertheless, Poland advanced as group winners to the knockout stage.[15] However, Poland would eventually be stopped in the semi-finals, losing 0–2 to Italy; however, they also secured a place in the third place play-off,[21] where Poland beat France 3–2, with the game also being regarded as "the end of the golden era of Polish football".[22]

 
Poland scoring v River Plate during their tour on Argentina, February 1986

In 1986 FIFA World Cup qualifying, Poland finished top of their qualifying group, with 3 wins, 2 draws and 1 defeat.[23] Poland's biggest win of the qualifying phase was a 4–1 win over Greece, while Poland's biggest defeat was a 0–2 defeat to Belgium.[24][25]

At the 1986 World Cup, Poland were drawn into a group with England, Morocco and Portugal.[26] The first match was a 0–0 draw against Morocco; in the second match, Poland beat Portugal 1–0.[27][28] In the final group game, they lost 0–3 to England, but Poland still advanced into the knockout stage as a result of Morocco winning 3–1 over Portugal.[29][30] In the round of sixteen, Poland were eliminated after suffering a 4–0 defeat to Brazil.[31]

1986–2001 edit

After the "Golden Era" from the 1970s and 1980s, Poland suffered a severe drought in international football; they did not qualify for three consecutive editions of the FIFA World Cup, from 1990 to 1998.

In 1990 World Cup qualifying, Poland finished third in the qualifying group, behind Sweden and England. They finished on 5 points with two wins, one draw and three defeats.[32] They began qualifying for the 1990 edition with a 1–0 win over Albania, before losing to Sweden (2–1) and England (3–0).[33][34][35] Poland then drew 0–0 with England, lost to Sweden 2–0 and beat Albania 2–1 in their final game, but were 4 points behind England, thus failing to qualify.[36][37][38]

In 1994 World Cup qualifying, Poland finished fourth in the qualifying group, behind Norway, the Netherlands and England.[39] Poland began qualifying with a 1–0 win over Turkey, followed by a 2–2 draw with the Netherlands, a 1–0 win over San Marino, and a 3–0 win in the reverse fixture.[40][41][42][43] Afterwards, Poland drew 1–1 with England, before falling to a 0–3 defeat in the reverse fixture.[44][45] Poland would then go on to suffer consecutive defeats, losing 1–0 and 3–0 to Norway, followed by a 2–1 defeat to Turkey and a 1–3 defeat to the Netherlands in the final fixture.[46][47][48][49]

 
Andrzej Juskowiak; top goalscorer for Poland in Euro 1996 qualifying (7 goals) and 1998 World Cup qualifying (3 goals)

In Euro 1996 qualifying, Poland drew a qualifying group with Romania, France, Slovakia, Israel and Azerbaijan.[50] Poland lost 2–1 to Israel in the first game, and then recorded a 1–0 win over Azerbaijan and a 0–0 draw with France.[51][52][53] Later, Poland lost 2–1 to Romania and beat Israel 4–3 and Slovakia 5–0 before consecutive draws with France (1–1) and Romania (0–0).[54][55][56][57] Poland lost 4–1 to Slovakia in the penultimate qualifying game, and drew 0–0 with Azerbaijan in the final group game.[58][59]

In 1998 World Cup qualifying, Poland finished third behind England and Italy.[60] They began qualifying with a 2–1 loss to England before beating Moldova (2–1) and drawing 0–0 with Italy.[61][62][63] Afterwards, they suffered successive defeats to Italy (3–0) and England (0–2).[64][65] They won the next two games with scores of 4–1 over Georgia and 3–0 over Moldova, with Andrzej Juskowiak scoring a hat-trick against the latter.[66][67] The final game was against Georgia, with Poland losing 0–3.[68]

During UEFA Euro 2000 qualifying, Poland was drawn in a group with England, Sweden, Bulgaria and Luxembourg. Poland finished third, tied with England in points earned, but failed to qualify due to goal difference.

2001–2006 edit

Poland qualified for the 2002 World Cup, their first appearance at the World Cup since 1986.[69] Poland's biggest win overall in the qualifying phase was a 4–0 win over Armenia, while their biggest defeat was a 4–1 defeat to Belarus.[70][71]

The Polish drew a group featuring hosts South Korea, the United States and Portugal.[72] The first match was played against the hosts on 4 June, with Poland losing 2–0.[73] The second game was against Portugal on 10 June, which Poland lost 4–0, confirming their early elimination.[74] Poland then played the United States in the final group game on 14 June, winning 3–1; however, the U.S. advanced to the quarter-finals after defeating Mexico in the round of 16.[75] Despite the win, Poland finished last in the group, with a goal difference of –4 and 3 points.[7]

 
Tomasz Frankowski; top goalscorer during Poland's 2006 World Cup qualifying campaign, with 7 goals

Poland's qualifying for the 2006 FIFA World Cup saw eight wins and two defeats.[76] They finished behind England in the qualifying group; but as a result of being the second best second-placed team in the play-offs, they qualified automatically for the finals in Germany.[76] The biggest win of the qualifying phase for Poland was an 8–0 victory over Azerbaijan, in which Tomasz Frankowski scored a hat-trick.[77][78] The biggest defeat of the qualifying phase for Poland were two defeats against England, losing both home and away games by a scoreline of 1–2.[79][80]

At the 2006 World Cup, Poland drew Germany, Ecuador and Costa Rica in Group A.[81] Despite high hopes from the Polish press, media and fans, Poland's campaign at the World Cup was seen as an underachievement; as Poland lost two and won one game, finishing third in the group.[82] Poland's first match was a 2–0 defeat to Ecuador,[83] followed by a 1–0 defeat to Germany, with Oliver Neuville scoring a stoppage time winning goal;[84] the defeat to Germany, following Ecuador's 3–0 win over Costa Rica, officially ended Poland's chances of advancing further than the group stage.[85] The third and final group game saw Poland defeat Costa Rica 2–1, with Bartosz Bosacki getting on the scoresheet twice.[86][87]

2008 edit

 
Ebi Smolarek, who scored 9 goals during the qualifying phase

In Euro 2008 qualifying, Poland were drawn into a group with Portugal, Serbia, Finland, Belgium, Kazakhstan, Armenia and Azerbaijan.[88] Poland's campaign began in uncomfortable fashion, suffering a 1–3 defeat to Finland on 2 September 2006 and then drawing 1–1 with Serbia on 6 September.[89][90] In the third match, on 7 October, Poland won 1–0 over Kazakhstan, with Ebi Smolarek scoring the goal.[91] On 11 October, Poland beat Portugal 2–1, with Smolarek scoring the two goals.[92] Poland beat Belgium 1–0 on 15 November.[93] On 24 March 2007, Poland beat Azerbaijan 5–0, and on 28 March beat Armenia 1–0.[94][95] On 2 June, they beat Azerbaijan 3–1, with Smolarek and Krzynówek (2) scoring.[96] On 6 June, Poland lost 1–0 to Armenia, on 8 September drew 2–2 with Portugal, and on 12 September drew 0–0 with Finland.[97][98][99] On 13 October, Poland beat Kazakhstan 3–1 with a hat-trick from Smolarek.[100] They beat Belgium 2–0 with two goals from Smolarek on 17 November, and on 21 November drew 2–2 with Serbia in the final qualifying game, thus qualifying for the tournament as the 1st place team in the qualifying group following Portugal's 0–0 draw with Finland. This was Poland's first ever Euro appearance.[101][102][103]

At UEFA Euro 2008, they were drawn in Group B, with Germany, Austria and Croatia.[104] Germany and Poland played on 8 June at the Hypo-Arena in Klagenfurt, Austria, with Poland losing 2–0 with two goals from Lukas Podolski.[105] In the second game, Poland drew 1–1 with Austria, taking the lead through Brazil-born Roger Guerreiro, before conceding in the third minute of stoppage time following a controversial penalty.[106][107] Poland lost 1–0 in the final group game was against Croatia and finished bottom of the group.[108]

2010 edit

In 2010 FIFA World Cup qualifying, Poland were drawn in a group with Slovakia, Slovenia, the Czech Republic, Northern Ireland and San Marino. Poland finished fifth in the group, just above San Marino, with 11 points.[109] Poland began the campaign with a 1–1 draw against Slovenia on 6 September 2008.[110] On 10 October, Poland beat San Marino 2–0.[111] On 11 October, they won 2–1 against the Czech Republic.[112] After these wins, Poland lost consecutive matches against Slovakia (2–1) and Northern Ireland (3–2).[113][114] Poland then recorded their biggest ever win with a scoreline of 10–0 against San Marino. Six different players scored in the win on 1 April 2009.[115][116] In the last rounds of qualifying, Poland drew 1–1 with Northern Ireland and lost to Slovenia.[117][118] Poland then ended the campaign with consecutive losses to the Czech Republic and Slovakia.[119][120]

2012 edit

On 18 April 2007, in Cardiff, Poland and Ukraine were selected to host UEFA Euro 2012 by the UEFA Executive Committee. The bid defeated others from Italy, Greece, Turkey, and a joint bid by Croatia and Hungary. Poland and Ukraine's bid became the third successful joint-bid made to host the UEFA European Championship, after the Netherlands and Belgium in 2000, and Austria and Switzerland in 2008.

Poland were drawn into Group A, with Greece, Russia and the Czech Republic.[121] On 8 June, the opening match played between Poland and Greece at the Stadion Narodowy in Warsaw ended 1–1, with Poland taking the lead in the 17th minute through Robert Lewandowski before Greece equalized in the second half through Dimitris Salpingidis in the 51st minute. Both teams went down to 10 men during the game.[122][123] Poland's next game was on 12 June, again played at the Stadion Narodowy in Warsaw, with the game against Russia finishing 1–1. Russia took the lead through Alan Dzagoev in the 37th minute before Poland equalized through Błaszczykowski in the 57th minute.[124][125] Poland's final game was played against the Czech Republic on 16 June at the Stadion Miejski, in Wrocław, where Poland lost 1–0 following a goal from Petr Jiráček.[126][127] Poland finished bottom of the group with two points, prompting coach Franciszek Smuda to resign following the elimination.[121]

2014–2021 edit

Poland was drawn in Group H of 2014 FIFA World Cup qualifying, with England, Ukraine, Montenegro, Moldova and San Marino.[128]

On 7 September, Poland's first qualifying match ended in a 2–2 draw with Montenegro, with goals from Błaszczykowski and Mierzejewski.[129] On 11 September, they beat Moldova 2–0 with goals from Błaszczykowski and Wawrzyniak.[130] On 17 October, Poland drew 1–1 with England, with Glik scoring the equalizing goal.[131] On 22 March 2013, Poland lost 3–1 to Ukraine, conceding two goals in the first seven minutes alone, with Piszczek scoring Poland's only goal.[132] On 26 March, Poland beat San Marino 5–0, with a brace from Lewandowski, and goals from Piszczek, Teodorczyk and Kosecki.[133] On 6 September, Poland drew 1–1 with Montenegro, with Lewandowski scoring the equalizing goal only five minutes after Poland initially conceded.[134] On 10 September, they beat San Marino 5–1, with a brace from Zieliński, and goals from Błaszczykowski, Sobota and Mierzejewski.[135] However, Poland lost the last two games against Ukraine and England, 1–0 and 2–0, respectively.[136][137][138]

In UEFA Euro 2016 qualifying, Poland were drawn in Group D, with Germany, Scotland, the Republic of Ireland, Georgia and Gibraltar.[139]

On 11 October 2014, Poland beat 2014 World Cup champions Germany 2–0.[140] Three days later, Poland drew 2–2 with Scotland.[141] They drew 1–1 with the Republic of Ireland in March 2015 after conceding a goal from Shane Long in stoppage time.[142] By October, they beat the Republic of Ireland to score enough points for securing automatic qualification for the Euros.[143]

(Left): Jakub Błaszczykowski playing for Poland during the Euro 2016 quarter-final match with Portugal, on 30 June 2016; (right): Robert Lewandowski, who finished the 2018 FIFA World Cup qualifying campaign with 16 goals; breaking the European qualifying record for goals scored, as well as becoming all-time top goalscorer for Poland.[144]

At UEFA Euro 2016, Poland were drawn in Group C, with Germany, Northern Ireland and Ukraine.[145]

Poland's first match was with Northern Ireland on 12 June at the Stade de Nice in Nice; they won the game 1–0 with a goal from Arkadiusz Milik in the 51st minute.[146] The next match was with Germany at the Stade de France in Saint-Denis on 16 June; with the finishing 0–0.[147] Poland's final group game was with Ukraine on 21 June, at the Stade Vélodrome in Marseille, a game they won 1–0 with a goal from Jakub Błaszczykowski.[148] In the round of sixteen, Poland were drawn to play Switzerland on 25 June at the Stade Geoffroy-Guichard in Saint-Étienne. Poland took the lead through a goal from Błaszczykowski, but conceded a bicycle kick from Xherdan Shaqiri in the 82nd minute, finishing the game 1–1 in regular time. Poland then beat Switzerland in a penalty shootout, 5–4.[149][150] Poland then faced Portugal in the quarter-finals; another penalty shootout occurred after a 1–1 draw. Poland lost the shootout 5–3.[151]

 
The Poland national team line-up before the third and final group game against Japan on 28 June 2018. Poland won the game 1–0.[152]

In 2018 FIFA World Cup qualifying, Poland were drawn in Group E, with Denmark, Montenegro, Romania, Armenia and Kazakhstan.[153]

Despite drawing with Kazakhstan on 4 September 2016's opening match, Lewandowski scored 16 goals during qualifying, breaking the European qualifying scoring record, as well as becoming the all-time top goalscorer of Poland.[154]

Poland played at the 2018 FIFA World Cup, their first World Cup since 2006, in Group H, against Senegal, Colombia and Japan.[155] Despite the group being considered close, Poland were tipped as favorites to advance.[156][157][158]

Poland's tournament was disappointing overall; they lost to Senegal in the opening match, 2–1 on 19 June in Moscow.[159] Five days later, on 24 June, they lost to Colombia in Kazan 3–0,[160] mathematically eliminating them from the round of 16. They did beat Japan 1–0 in their final group game in Volgograd.[161] Poland finished at the bottom of their group.

Qualifying for UEFA Euro 2020 was based on performance in the inaugural 2018–19 UEFA Nations League. In 2018, Poland was drawn into Group 3 in the 2018–19 UEFA Nations League A, along with Portugal and Italy. Poland was relegated to League B with two home defeats and two away draws, only to be allowed to remain on League A following UEFA rule changes.

Poland opened their UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying by a single-margin 1–0 win against Austria in Vienna.[162] Three days later, Poland followed up their suit by beating Latvia 2–0 at home.[163]

On 7 June 2019, Poland defeated North Macedonia 1–0 by a lone goal from Piątek.[164] They then beat Israel 4–0 in Warsaw.[165] Poland then lost 2–0 to Slovenia in Ljubljana.[166] A following 0–0 home draw to Austria meant that Poland's top spot was under bank, with Slovenia approaching very quickly.[167]

In October, Poland embattled two opponents, Latvia and North Macedonia, for its UEFA Euro 2020 quest. Poland managed a convincing 3–0 away win over Latvia, eliminating them from the competition.[168] Slovenia's shock away defeat to North Macedonia relieved pressure for Poland, with Slovenia falling from second to fourth place.[169] Eventually, Poland beat North Macedonia 2–0 at home,[170] and with Slovenia falling at home to Austria,[171] Poland qualified for the Euros for the fourth consecutive time.

Being allowed to remain in League A, Poland was drawn against Italy, the Netherlands, and Bosnia and Herzegovina. The performance of this tournament doubled as part of the upcoming 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification as playoff campaigns.

Poland started their League games without Lewandowski. In their first match, an away game against the Netherlands, the Poles lost 1–0.[172] Then, Poland made a trip to Bosnia; the Bosnian team, including Edin Džeko, had held Italy 1–1 away before. However, Poland managed a comeback from a goal down, with Kamil Glik and Kamil Grosicki scoring to beat Bosnia 2–1.[173] In October, Poland hosted Italy and Bosnia at home; a goalless draw with Italy combined with a 3–0 win over Bosnia made them temporarily occupy the top spot of the group.[174][175] However, in November, Poland suffered a 2–0 defeat despite Italy being depleted by COVID-19.[176] Poland lost to the Netherlands 2–1 at home, ending in third place.[177]

Poland participated in UEFA Euro 2020, postponed to 2021 due to COVID-19. A 2–1 loss to Slovakia,[178] followed by a 1–1 draw to Spain, preceded a 3–2 defeat to Sweden to eliminate the Poles.[179][180]

2022–present edit

Poland advanced to the second round (play-offs) of World Cup qualification to determine the final three European teams that would join the group winners at the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar. Poland was scheduled to face Russia in Moscow on 24 March 2022 in the semi-final of a four-team playoff bracket that also included Sweden and the Czech Republic. However, following the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, FIFA indefinitely suspended Russia from all international competition. Poland advanced automatically to the play-off finals, where they defeated Sweden to qualify.[181] At the 2022 World Cup, Poland was drawn into Group C, where they were scheduled to play against Argentina, Saudi Arabia, and Mexico.[182] The first match ended with a goalless draw against Mexico.[183] Goals from Piotr Zieliński and Robert Lewandowski gave Poland a 2–0 win against Saudi Arabia in the second match.[184] Following their loss to Argentina, Poland advanced to the knockout stage ahead of Mexico on goal difference, their first knockout stage appearance since 1986.[185] During the match, Wojciech Szczęsny denied Lionel Messi on a penalty kick opportunity. Szczęsny became the third keeper ever to stop two penalties in a single World Cup,[186] with the others being Brad Friedel in 2002 for the United States and Jan Tomaszewski in 1974, also for Poland.[187] In the round of 16, Poland lost 3–1 to France, in which Robert Lewandowski scored a penalty in stoppage time.[188][189]

Czesław Michniewicz did not renew his contract as manager and his place was taken by award-winning coach Fernando Santos to take on the mission of qualifying for Euro 2024.[190][191] Defeats to the Czech Republic, Moldova and Albania brought his dismissal.[191] In September 2023, Fernando Santos was replaced by Michał Probierz, who started with a win against the Faroe Islands in Euro 2024 qualifying, but then drew with Moldova.[192] Poland later ended qualification for Euro 2024 with a 1–1 draw to the Czech Republic, ending all hopes for Poland to clinch automatic qualification. However, because of Poland's Nations League performance, the Poles were able to salvage a place in the play-offs, where Poland will be scheduled to face Estonia; the winner of this fixture will face either Wales or Finland for the decisive ticket to the tournament.

Team image edit

Names edit

The official FIFA country code for Poland is POL. This abbreviation is used to identify the team in FIFA, UEFA, and other matches. The same abbreviation is also used under the International Organization for Standardization. "Polish national football team" can be translated into Polish as "Reprezentacja Polski w piłce nożnej". The team's most common nicknames include "Biało-czerwoni", which means "The white-reds", and "Orły", which translates into "The Eagles". In English, the team is also widely known as "The White Eagles", based on Poland's national coat of arms.

Supporters edit

 
Polish football fans

The Polish team enjoys widespread support in Poland and among Polish diaspora worldwide. Some fans of the team are reportedly fanatic and often violent, with connections to Polish organized crime syndicates.[193] Supporters of the team have been involved in a number of incidents, such as during UEFA Euro 2012, held in Poland, when Polish and Russian supporters clashed prior to the encounter between the two countries' teams.[194]

A notable chant among Polish fans is "Polska, biało-czerwoni" ("Poland, the White-Reds").[195]

National kits edit

 
Poland scarf

The national kits of Poland reflect the colours of the national flag, which are white and red. Apart from minor details (in the 1920s the socks in the home kit were striped), the design remains unchanged since 1921. The home kit consists of a white shirt, red shorts, and white socks; the away kit is all red (though sometimes worn with white shorts). On the rare occasions when both home and away kits clash with the opponent's, a colours third kit is available, usually in either black or blue (currently navy blue with white-red sleeves).

The kit has traditionally been adorned with the coat of arms of Poland, i.e. the crowned white eagle. Until 2006, the coat of arms featured only the inscription "POLSKA" in capital letters above the eagle, and not, as with many other national teams, the national football federation logo. The Euro 2012 kits were the first to feature the logo of the PZPN. When the kit was first launched it did not include the coat of arms, but it was restored shortly thereafter. Since 2009, the kits have been provided by Nike.

Kit supplier Period
  Polsport until 1974
  Adidas 1974–1992
  Admiral 1992–1993
  Dorbill 1993
  Adidas 1993
  Lotto 1993–1994
  Puma 1994–1996
  Nike 1996–1999
  Adidas 1999
  Puma 1999–2000
  Tico 2000
  Puma 2001–2008
  Nike 2009–present

Stadiums edit

Main stadiums edit

Stadion Śląski in Chorzów was built in 1956; the stadium has a seating capacity of 47,246. The stadium was renovated to expand its seating capacity to 55,211 and was reopened in October 2017. In 1993, the stadium was designated as the official home stadium of the Poland national team. In 2011, Stadion Narodowy in Warsaw was completed with a capacity of 58,580 and since then, it has become a major stadium of Polish team and hosts most of Euro and World Cup qualifications matches.

Other stadiums edit

Poland has also played at the following stadiums:

Results and fixtures edit

The list below includes match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

  Win   Draw   Loss   Fixture

2023 edit

24 March 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Czech Republic   3–1   Poland Prague, Czech Republic
20:45
Report Stadium: Fortuna Arena
Attendance: 19,045
Referee: Anastasios Sidiropoulos (Greece)
27 March 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Poland   1–0   Albania Warsaw, Poland
20:45
Report Stadium: Stadion Narodowy
Attendance: 56,227
Referee: Slavko Vinčić (Slovenia)
16 June 2023 Friendly Poland   1–0   Germany Warsaw, Poland
20:45 CEST (UTC+02:00)
Report Stadium: Stadion Narodowy
Attendance: 57,098
Referee: Orel Grinfeld (Israel)
20 June 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Moldova   3–2   Poland Chișinău, Moldova
20:45 CEST (UTC+02:00)
Report
Stadium: Zimbru Stadium
Attendance: 9,442
Referee: Filip Glova (Slovakia)
7 September 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Poland   2–0   Faroe Islands Warsaw, Poland
20:45 CEST (UTC+02:00)
Report Stadium: Stadion Narodowy
Attendance: 54,129
Referee: David Smajc (Slovenia)
10 September 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Albania   2–0   Poland Tirana, Albania
20:45 CEST (UTC+02:00)
Report Stadium: Arena Kombëtare
Attendance: 21,900
Referee: José María Sánchez (Spain)
12 October 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Faroe Islands   0–2   Poland Tórshavn, Faroe Islands
20:45 CEST (UTC+02:00) Report
Stadium: Tórsvøllur
Attendance: 3,220
Referee: Allard Lindhout (Netherlands)
15 October 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Poland   1–1   Moldova Warsaw, Poland
20:45 CEST (UTC+02:00)
Report
Stadium: Stadion Narodowy
Attendance: 51,672
Referee: Artur Soares Dias (Portugal)
17 November 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Poland   1–1   Czech Republic Warsaw, Poland
20:45 CET (UTC+01:00)
Report
Stadium: Stadion Narodowy
Attendance: 56,310
Referee: Daniele Orsato (Italy)
21 November 2023 Friendly Poland   2–0   Latvia Warsaw, Poland
21:45 UTC+2
Report Stadium: Stadion Narodowy
Attendance: 31,000
Referee: Ondrej Berka (Czech Republic)

2024 edit

21 March 2024 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Poland   v   Estonia Warsaw, Poland
20:45 Report Stadium: Stadion Narodowy
26 March 2024 Friendly or UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Wales   or Finland   v   Poland Cardiff, Wales or Helsinki, Finland
5 September 2024 (2024-09-05) 2024-25 UEFA Nations League A Scotland   v   Poland Glasgow, Scotland
20:45 (19:45 UTC+1) Report Stadium: Hampden Park
8 September 2024 (2024-09-08) 2024-25 UEFA Nations League A Croatia   v   Poland Croatia
20:45 Report Stadium: TBD
12 October 2024 (2024-10-12) 2024-25 UEFA Nations League A Poland   v   Portugal Poland
20:45 Report Stadium: TBD
15 October 2024 (2024-10-15) 2024-25 UEFA Nations League A Poland   v   Croatia Poland
20:45 Report Stadium: TBD
15 November 2024 (2024-11-15) 2024-25 UEFA Nations League A Portugal   v   Poland Portugal
20:45 (19:45 UTC±0) Report Stadium: TBD
18 November 2024 (2024-11-18) 2024-25 UEFA Nations League A Poland   v   Scotland Poland
20:45 Report Stadium: TBD

Non-playing staff edit

As of 14 November 2023[196]
Position Name
Head coach   Michał Probierz
Assistant coaches   Michał Bartosz
  Robert Góralczyk
  Sebastian Mila
Goalkeeping coaches   Andrzej Dawidziuk
  Tomasz Kuszczak
Fitness coaches   Radosław Gwiazda
  Mateusz Oszust
Match analyst   Hubert Małowiejski
Video analyst   Jakub Rejmoniak
Doctor   Jacek Jaroszewski
Physiotherapists   Paweł Bamber
  Marcin Bator
  Adam Kurek
  Wojciech Herman
Team manager   Jakub Kwiatkowski
Communications manager   Tomasz Kozłowski
Logistics manager   Łukasz Gawrjołek
Technical director   Paweł Kosedowski
Assistant technical director   Paweł Sidorowicz
Cooks   Tomasz Leśniak
  Radosław Marcińczyk
Nutritionist   Wojciech Zep
Security officer   Robert Siwek

Coaching history edit

Caretaker manager are listed in italics.

Prior to 1966 the Polish team was chosen by a selection committee.[197]

Players edit

Current squad edit

The following players were called up for the UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying match against Czech Republic and friendly match against Latvia on 17 and 21 November 2023.[198]

Caps and goals updated as of 21 November 2023, after the match against Latvia, as recognized by the PZPN.[199][200]

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Wojciech Szczęsny (1990-04-18) 18 April 1990 (age 33) 79 0   Juventus
1GK Łukasz Skorupski (1991-05-05) 5 May 1991 (age 32) 9 0   Bologna
1GK Marcin Bułka (1999-10-04) 4 October 1999 (age 24) 1 0   Nice

2DF Jan Bednarek (1996-04-12) 12 April 1996 (age 27) 54 1   Southampton
2DF Tomasz Kędziora (1994-06-11) 11 June 1994 (age 29) 32 1   PAOK
2DF Jakub Kiwior (2000-02-15) 15 February 2000 (age 24) 19 1   Arsenal
2DF Tymoteusz Puchacz (1999-01-23) 23 January 1999 (age 25) 12 0   1. FC Kaiserslautern
2DF Mateusz Wieteska (1997-02-11) 11 February 1997 (age 27) 4 0   Cagliari
2DF Bartłomiej Wdowik (2000-09-25) 25 September 2000 (age 23) 1 0   Jagiellonia Białystok

3MF Kamil Grosicki (1988-06-08) 8 June 1988 (age 35) 93 17   Pogoń Szczecin
3MF Przemysław Frankowski (1995-04-12) 12 April 1995 (age 28) 38 2   Lens
3MF Sebastian Szymański (1999-05-10) 10 May 1999 (age 24) 29 2   Fenerbahçe
3MF Damian Szymański (1995-06-16) 16 June 1995 (age 28) 17 2   AEK Athens
3MF Paweł Wszołek (1992-04-30) 30 April 1992 (age 31) 14 2   Legia Warsaw
3MF Nicola Zalewski (2002-01-23) 23 January 2002 (age 22) 14 0   Roma
3MF Bartosz Slisz (1999-03-29) 29 March 1999 (age 24) 6 0   Atlanta United
3MF Jakub Piotrowski (1997-10-04) 4 October 1997 (age 26) 3 1   Ludogorets Razgrad
3MF Karol Struski (2001-01-18) 18 January 2001 (age 23) 1 0   Aris Limassol

4FW Robert Lewandowski (captain) (1988-08-21) 21 August 1988 (age 35) 146 82   Barcelona
4FW Karol Świderski (1997-01-23) 23 January 1997 (age 27) 28 10   Hellas Verona
4FW Adam Buksa (1996-07-12) 12 July 1996 (age 27) 13 6   Antalyaspor

Recent call-ups edit

The following players have been called up for the national team in the last twelve months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Bartłomiej Drągowski (1997-08-19) 19 August 1997 (age 26) 2 0   Panathinaikos v.   Faroe Islands, 12 October 2023 WD
GK Kamil Grabara (1999-01-08) 8 January 1999 (age 25) 1 0   Copenhagen v.   Faroe Islands, 7 September 2023 INJ

DF Paweł Bochniewicz (1996-01-30) 30 January 1996 (age 28) 3 0   Heerenveen v.   Latvia, 21 November 2023 INJ
DF Patryk Peda (2002-04-16) 16 April 2002 (age 21) 3 0   SPAL v.   Latvia, 21 November 2023 U21
DF Matty Cash (1997-08-07) 7 August 1997 (age 26) 14 1   Aston Villa v.   Czech Republic, 17 November 2023 INJ
DF Bartosz Bereszyński (1992-07-12) 12 July 1992 (age 31) 54 0   Empoli v.   Moldova, 15 October 2023
DF Sebastian Walukiewicz (2000-04-05) 5 April 2000 (age 23) 3 0   Empoli v.   Moldova, 15 October 2023
DF Paweł Dawidowicz (1995-05-20) 20 May 1995 (age 28) 8 0   Hellas Verona v.   Albania, 10 September 2023
DF Przemysław Wiśniewski (1998-07-27) 27 July 1998 (age 25) 0 0   Spezia v.   Moldova, 20 June 2023
DF Arkadiusz Reca (1995-06-17) 17 June 1995 (age 28) 15 0   Spezia v.   Germany, 16 June 2023 INJ
DF Bartosz Salamon (1991-05-01) 1 May 1991 (age 32) 11 0   Lech Poznań v.   Albania, 27 March 2023
DF Robert Gumny (1998-06-04) 4 June 1998 (age 25) 6 0   FC Augsburg v.   Albania, 27 March 2023
DF Michał Karbownik (2001-03-13) 13 March 2001 (age 22) 4 0   Hertha BSC v.   Albania, 27 March 2023
DF Kamil Piątkowski (2001-06-21) 21 June 2001 (age 22) 3 0   Granada v.   Czech Republic, 24 March 2023 INJ

MF Piotr Zieliński (1994-05-20) 20 May 1994 (age 29) 86 10   Napoli v.   Latvia, 21 November 2023 WD
MF Mateusz Łęgowski (2003-01-29) 29 January 2003 (age 21) 1 0   Salernitana v.   Latvia, 21 November 2023 U21
MF Patryk Dziczek (1998-02-25) 25 February 1998 (age 26) 2 0   Piast Gliwice v.   Czech Republic, 17 November 2023 INJ
MF Jakub Kamiński (2002-06-05) 5 June 2002 (age 21) 14 1   VfL Wolfsburg v.   Moldova, 15 October 2023
MF Filip Marchwiński (2002-01-10) 10 January 2002 (age 22) 2 0   Lech Poznań v.   Moldova, 15 October 2023
MF Grzegorz Krychowiak (1990-01-29) 29 January 1990 (age 34) 100 5   Abha v.   Albania, 10 September 2023 RET
MF Karol Linetty (1995-02-02) 2 February 1995 (age 29) 47 5   Torino v.   Albania, 10 September 2023
MF Michał Skóraś (2000-02-15) 15 February 2000 (age 24) 7 0   Club Brugge v.   Albania, 10 September 2023
MF Kacper Kozłowski (2003-10-16) 16 October 2003 (age 20) 6 0   Vitesse v.   Albania, 10 September 2023
MF Krystian Bielik (1998-01-04) 4 January 1998 (age 26) 11 0   Birmingham City v.   Moldova, 20 June 2023
MF Ben Lederman (2000-05-08) 8 May 2000 (age 23) 0 0   Raków Częstochowa v.   Moldova, 20 June 2023
MF Jakub Błaszczykowski (1985-12-14) 14 December 1985 (age 38) 109 21 Retired v.   Germany, 16 June 2023 RET

FW Adrian Benedyczak (2000-11-24) 24 November 2000 (age 23) 0 0   Parma v.   Czech Republic, 17 November 2023 INJ
FW Arkadiusz Milik (1994-02-28) 28 February 1994 (age 30) 72 17   Juventus v.   Moldova, 15 October 2023
FW Krzysztof Piątek (1995-07-01) 1 July 1995 (age 28) 27 11   İstanbul Başakşehir v.   Albania, 27 March 2023

INJ Withdrew from the squad due to an injury.
WD Player withdrew from the squad
RET Retired from the national team.
U21 Joined Poland national under-21 football team.

Player records edit

As of 21 November 2023[201]
Players in bold are still active with Poland.

Most appearances edit

 
Robert Lewandowski is Poland's top goalscorer and their most capped player.
Rank Player Caps Goals Career
1 Robert Lewandowski 146 82 2008–present
2 Jakub Błaszczykowski 109 21 2006–2023
3 Kamil Glik 103 6 2010–present
4 Michał Żewłakow 102 3 1999–2011
5 Grzegorz Krychowiak 100 5 2008–2023
Grzegorz Lato 100 45 1971–1984
7 Kazimierz Deyna 97 41 1968–1978
8 Jacek Bąk 96 3 1993–2008
Jacek Krzynówek 96 15 1998–2009
10 Kamil Grosicki 93 17 2008–present

Top goalscorers edit

Rank Player Goals Caps Ratio Career
1 Robert Lewandowski (list) 82 146 0.56 2008–present
2 Włodzimierz Lubański 48 75 0.64 1963–1980
3 Grzegorz Lato 45 100 0.45 1971–1984
4 Kazimierz Deyna 41 97 0.42 1968–1978
5 Ernest Pol 39 46 0.85 1955–1965
6 Andrzej Szarmach 32 61 0.52 1973–1982
7 Gerard Cieślik 27 45 0.6 1947–1958
8 Zbigniew Boniek 24 80 0.3 1976–1988
9 Ernest Wilimowski 21 22 0.95 1934–1939
Jakub Błaszczykowski 21 109 0.19 2006–2023

Most clean sheets edit

Rank Player Clean sheets Caps Ratio Career
1 Wojciech Szczęsny 33 79 0.42 2009–present
2 Łukasz Fabiański 27 57 0.47 2006–2021
3 Józef Wandzik 25 52 0.48 1985–1995
4 Artur Boruc 24 65 0.37 2004–2017
5 Jerzy Dudek 23 60 0.38 1998–2013
Jan Tomaszewski 23 63 0.37 1971–1981
7 Adam Matysek 20 34 0.59 1991–2002
8 Hubert Kostka 13 32 0.41 1962–1972
Jarosław Bako 13 35 0.37 1988–1993
Józef Młynarczyk 13 42 0.31 1979–1986

Players who received citizenship edit

Players in bold are still active with Poland.
Players in italic are without Polish origin
Rank Player Caps Goals Career
1   Ludovic Obraniak 34 6 2008–2014
2   Roger Guerreiro 25 4 2008–2011
  Emmanuel Olisadebe 25 11 2000–2004
3   Thiago Cionek 21 0 2014-2018
  Adam Matuszczyk 21 1 2010-2013
4   Eugen Polanski 19 0 2011–2014
5   Damien Perquis 14 1 2011–2013
  Sebastian Boenisch 14 0 2010-2013
  Matty Cash 14 1 2021-present
6   Vahan Gevorgyan 1 0 2004
  Sebastian Tyrała 1 0 2008
  Taras Romanczuk 1 0 2018

Competitive record edit

  Champions    Runners-up    Third place     Tournament played fully or partially on home soil  

FIFA World Cup edit

FIFA World Cup record Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad Pld W D L GF GA
  1930 Did not enter Did not enter
  1934 Did not qualify 1 0 0 1 1 2
  1938 Round of 16 11th 1 0 0 1 5 6 Squad 2 1 0 1 4 1
  1950 Did not enter Did not enter
  1954 Withdrew Withdrew
  1958 Did not qualify 5 3 0 2 9 7
  1962 2 0 1 1 2 3
  1966 6 2 2 2 11 10
  1970 6 4 0 2 19 8
  1974 Third place 3rd 7 6 0 1 16 5 Squad 4 2 1 1 6 3
  1978 Second group stage 5th 6 3 1 2 6 6 Squad 6 5 1 0 17 4
  1982 Third place 3rd 7 3 3 1 11 5 Squad 4 4 0 0 12 2
  1986 Round of 16 14th 4 1 1 2 1 7 Squad 6 3 2 1 10 6
  1990 Did not qualify 6 2 1 3 4 8
  1994 10 3 2 5 10 15
  1998 8 3 1 4 10 12
    2002 Group stage 25th 3 1 0 2 3 7 Squad 10 6 3 1 21 11
  2006 21st 3 1 0 2 2 4 Squad 10 8 0 2 27 9
  2010 Did not qualify 10 3 2 5 19 14
  2014 10 3 4 3 18 12
  2018 Group stage 25th 3 1 0 2 2 5 Squad 10 8 1 1 28 14
  2022 Round of 16 15th 4 1 1 2 3 5 Squad 11 7 2 2 32 11
      2026 To be determined To be determined
      2030
  2034
Total Third place 9/22 38 17 6 15 49 50 127 67 23 37 260 152

Olympic Games edit

Year Round Pld W D L GF GA Squad
  1896 No football tournament
  1900 Did not enter
  1904
  1908
  1912
  1920
  1924 Round 1 1 0 0 1 0 5 Squad
  1928 Did not qualify
  1932 No football tournament
  1936 Fourth place 4 2 0 2 11 10 Squad
  1948 Did not qualify
  1952 Round 1 2 1 0 1 2 3 Squad
  1956 Did not qualify
  1960 Group stage 3 1 0 2 7 5 Squad
  1964 Did not qualify
  1968
  1972 Gold medalists 7 6 1 0 21 5 Squad
  1976 Silver medalists 5 3 1 1 11 5 Squad
  1980 Did not qualify
  1984
  1988
Since 1992 See Poland Olympic football team
Total 6/22 22 13 2 7 52 33

UEFA European Championship edit

UEFA European Championship record Qualifying record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad Pld W D L GF GA
  1960 Did not qualify 2 0 0 2 2 7
  1964 2 0 0 2 0 4
  1968 6 3 1 2 13 9
  1972 6 2 2 2 10 6
  1976 6 3 2 1 9 5
  1980 8 5 2 1 13 4
  1984 6 1 2 3 6 9
  1988 8 3 2 3 9 11
  1992 6 2 3 1 8 6
  1996 10 3 4 3 14 12
    2000 8 4 1 3 12 8
  2004 8 4 1 3 11 7
    2008 Group stage 14th 3 0 1 2 1 4 Squad 14 8 4 2 24 12
    2012 3 0 2 1 2 3 Squad Qualified as co-hosts
  2016 Quarter-finals 5th 5 2 3 0 4 2 Squad 10 6 3 1 33 10
  2020 Group stage 21st 3 0 1 2 4 6 Squad 10 8 1 1 18 5
  2024 To be determined To be determined
    2028
    2032
Total Quarter-finals 4/20 14 2 7 5 11 15 110 52 28 30 182 115

UEFA Nations League edit

UEFA Nations League record
Season Division Group Pld W D L GF GA P/R Rank
2018–19 A 3 4 0 2 2 4 6   10th
2020–21 A 1 6 2 1 3 6 6   10th
2022–23 A 4 6 2 1 3 6 12   11th
2024–25 A To be determined
Total 16 4 4 8 16 24 11th
Poland's UEFA Nations League history
First match   Italy 1–1 Poland  
(Bologna, Italy; 7 September 2018)
Biggest win   Poland 3–0 Bosnia and Herzegovina  
(Wrocław, Poland; 14 October 2020)
Biggest defeat   Belgium 6–1 Poland  
(Brussels, Belgium; 8 June 2022)
Best result 10th place in 2018–19 and 2020–21
Worst result 11th place in 2022–23

FIFA rankings history edit

Source:[202]

1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
28 29 33 53 48 31 32 43 33 34 25 25 22 24 22 34 58 73 66 55 76 41 34 15 7 20 19 19 21

Head-to-head record edit

Statistics updated as of 21 November 2023. List including all matches officially recognized by the Polish Football Association (also those not recognized by FIFA).

Key
Positive balance (more Wins)
Neutral balance (Wins = Losses)
Negative balance (more Losses)
Opponent Pld W D L GF GA GD Confederation %Won
  Albania 15 10 3 2 20 10 +10 UEFA 67%
  Algeria 2 2 0 0 6 1 +5 CAF 100%
  Andorra 3 3 0 0 11 1 +10 UEFA 100%
  Argentina 12 3 2 7 12 20 −8 CONMEBOL 25%
  Armenia 7 5 1 1 15 4 +11 UEFA 71%
  Australia 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1 AFC 0%
  Austria 10 5 2 3 19 17 +2 UEFA 50%
  Azerbaijan 6 5 1 0 20 1 +19 UEFA 83%
  Belarus 6 2 2 2 9 10 −1 UEFA 33%
  Belgium 21 7 6 8 27 27 0 UEFA 33%
  Bolivia 2 2 0 0 3 1 +2 CONMEBOL 100%
  Bosnia and Herzegovina 5 4 1 0 9 3 +3 UEFA 80%
  Brazil 12 1 2 9 19 37 −18 CONMEBOL 8%
  Bulgaria 25 12 9 4 47 30 +17 UEFA 48%
  Cameroon 3 0 2 1 0 3 −3 CAF 0%
  Canada 6 6 0 0 20 4 +16 CONCACAF 100%
  Chile 2 1 1 0 3 2 +1 CONMEBOL 50%
  China 2 2 0 0 2 0 +2 AFC 100%
  Colombia 6 2 0 4 8 10 −2 CONMEBOL 33%
  Costa Rica 3 3 0 0 8 3 +5 CONCACAF 100%
  Croatia 5 1 1 3 3 7 −4 UEFA 20%
  Cuba 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 CONCACAF 0%
  Cyprus 7 4 3 0 14 5 +9 UEFA 57%
  Czech Republic/  Czechoslovakia 29 8 6 15 39 56 −17 UEFA 28%
  Denmark 23 8 2 13 38 49 −11 UEFA 35%
  Ecuador 3 1 1 1 5 4 +1 CONMEBOL 33%
  Egypt 2 0 1 1 0 4 −4 CAF 0%
  England 21 1 8 12 13 33 −20 UEFA 5%
  Estonia 9 7 1 1 18 4 +14 UEFA 78%
  Faroe Islands 5 5 0 0 16 1 +15 UEFA 100%
  Finland 33 22 8 3 72 26 +42 UEFA 66%
  France 17 3 5 9 19 30 −11 UEFA 18%
  Georgia 5 4 0 1 13 4 +9 UEFA 80%
  East Germany 19 9 4 6 26 27 −1 UEFA 47%
  Germany/  West Germany 22 2 7 13 12 34 −22 UEFA 9%
  Ghana 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4 CAF 100%
  Gibraltar 2 2 0 0 15 1 +14 UEFA 100%
  Greece 17 10 4 3 30 12 +18 UEFA 59%
  Guatemala 2 1 1 0 3 2 +1 CONCACAF 50%
  Haiti 3 2 0 1 11 3 +8 CONCACAF 66%
  Hungary 34 8 5 21 43 92 −49 UEFA 24%
  Iceland 7 5 2 0 15 7 +8 UEFA 71%
  India 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 AFC 100%
  Iran 3 3 0 0 6 2 +4 AFC 100%
  Iraq 5 2 2 1 7 3 +4 AFC 40%
  Republic of Ireland 28 11 11 6 44 30 +14 UEFA 39%
  Israel 13 7 4 2 32 15 +17 UEFA 54%
  Italy 18 3 8 7 10 23 −13 UEFA 17%
  Ivory Coast 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 CAF 100%
  Japan 7 5 0 2 14 10 +4 AFC 71%
  Kazakhstan 5 4 1 0 12 3 +9 UEFA 80%
  North Korea 2 1 1 0 7 2 +5 AFC 50%
  South Korea 3 1 1 1 5 6 −1 AFC 33%
  Kuwait 2 1 1 0 3 1 +2 AFC 50%
  Latvia 16 12 2 2 42 15 +27 UEFA 75%
  Libya 1 1 0 0 5 0 +5 CAF 100%
  Liechtenstein 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 UEFA 100%
  Lithuania 11 5 4 2 17 8 +9 UEFA 45%
  Luxembourg 7 6 1 0 26 5 +21 UEFA 86%
  North Macedonia 5 4 1 0 11 2 +9 UEFA 80%
  Malta 4 4 0 0 13 0 +13 UEFA 100%
  Mexico 9 3 3 3 9 13 −4 CONCACAF 33%
  Moldova 8 5 2 1 13 6 +7 UEFA 63%
  Montenegro 4 2 2 0 9 6 +3 UEFA 50%
  Morocco 5 2 2 1 9 3 +6 CAF 40%
  Netherlands 19 3 7 9 19 28 −9 UEFA 16%
  New Zealand 2 1 1 0 2 0 +2 OFC 50%
  Nigeria 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 CAF 0%
  Northern Ireland 10 4 2 4 14 13 +1 UEFA 40%
  Norway 19 12 3 4 58 26 +32 UEFA 63%
  Paraguay 1 0 0 1 0 4 −4 CONMEBOL 0%
  Peru 3 3 0 0 9 2 +7 CONMEBOL 100%
  Portugal 13 3 5 5 13 18 −5 UEFA 23%
  Romania 36 7 15 14 57 56 +1 UEFA 19%
  Russia/  Soviet Union 19 4 6 9 18 34 −16 UEFA 21%
  San Marino 10 10 0 0 45 2 +43 UEFA 100%
  Saudi Arabia 4 4 0 0 7 2 +5 AFC 100%
  Scotland 11 3 6 2 15 14 +1 UEFA 27%
  Senegal 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1 CAF 0%
  Serbia/  Yugoslavia 26 10 7 9 51 54 −3 UEFA 38%
  Singapore 1 1 0 0 6 1 +5 AFC 100%
  Slovakia 9 3 1 5 14 14 0 UEFA 33%
  Slovenia 8 3 3 2 9 9 0 UEFA 38%
  South Africa 2 1 0 1 1 1 0 CAF 50%
  Spain 11 1 2 8 9 28 −19 UEFA 9%
  Sweden 28 9 4 15 41 59 −18 UEFA 32%
   Switzerland 11 4 6 1 21 12 +9 UEFA 36%
  Thailand 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 AFC 100%
  Tunisia 4 3 0 1 9 2 +7 CAF 75%
  Turkey 17 11 3 3 39 12 +27 UEFA 65%
  Ukraine 9 4 2 3 11 9 +2 UEFA 44%
  United Arab Emirates 2 2 0 0 9 2 +7 AFC 100%
  Uruguay 4 1 2 1 4 5 −1 CONMEBOL 25%
  United States 17 7 3 7 36 22 +14 CONCACAF 41%
  Wales 10 7 2 1 13 6 +7 UEFA 70%
Total 884 386 217 281 1,508 1,184 +325 FIFA 44%

Honours edit

Major edit

Minor edit

Notes edit

  1. ^ In fact, there was a previous meeting mentioned by the press in Kraków in 1892, though no details are known.

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External links edit