Liechtenstein national football team

The Liechtenstein national football team (German: Liechtensteinische Fußballnationalmannschaft) is the national football team of the Principality of Liechtenstein and is controlled by the Liechtenstein Football Association. The organisation is known as the Liechtensteiner Fussballverband in German. The team's first match was an unofficial match against Malta in Seoul, a 1–1 draw in 1981. Their first official match came two years later, a 0–1 defeat from Switzerland. Liechtenstein's largest win, a 4–0 win over Luxembourg in a 2006 FIFA World Cup qualifier on 13 October 2004, was both its first ever away win and its first win in any FIFA World Cup qualifier. Conversely, Liechtenstein is the only country that lost an official match against San Marino. Liechtenstein suffered its biggest ever loss in 1996, during qualification for the 1998 FIFA World Cup, losing 1–11 to Macedonia, the result also being Macedonia's largest ever win to date.

Liechtenstein
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)The Blues-Reds
AssociationLiechtenstein Football Association
(Liechtensteiner Fussballverband)
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachHelgi Kolviðsson
CaptainMartin Büchel
Most capsPeter Jehle (132)
Top scorerMario Frick (16)
Home stadiumRheinpark Stadion
FIFA codeLIE
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 180 Steady (16 July 2020)[1]
Highest118 (January 2008, July 2011, September 2011)
Lowest191 (July 2017)
First international
 Liechtenstein 1–1 Malta 
(Daejeon, South Korea; 14 June 1981)
Biggest win
 Luxembourg 0–4 Liechtenstein 
(Luxembourg, Luxembourg; 13 October 2004)
Biggest defeat
 Liechtenstein 1–11 Macedonia 
(Eschen, Liechtenstein; 9 November 1996)

HistoryEdit

Liechtenstein are only a relatively recent affiliate to FIFA, and did not participate in any qualifying series until the UEFA Euro 1996 qualifiers. There they managed to surprise the Republic of Ireland by holding them to a 0–0 draw on 3 June 1995. On 14 October 1998, they managed their first victory in a qualifying campaign after winning 2–1 against Azerbaijan in a Euro 2000 qualifying match.

Since then, the presence of Liechtenstein clubs in the Swiss league system and of a handful of professional players (most notably Mario Frick) has seen the side's competitiveness improve slightly. The Euro 2004 qualifiers saw Liechtenstein improve to the extent they restricted England to 2–0 wins. The 2006 World Cup qualifiers, however, brought even better results as two wins over Luxembourg and draws against both Slovakia and Portugal meant that Liechtenstein finished with 8 points.

In the Euro 2008 qualifiers, Liechtenstein beat Latvia through a solitary goal from Mario Frick. The result caused the Latvian manager to resign after the match. They repeated their heroics against Iceland managing to beat them 3–0 on 17 October 2007 for their second qualifying group win. On the 26 March 2008 Liechtenstein had an embarrassing 7–1 loss to fellow small nation in Europe, Malta. This was recorded as Malta's largest win.[3]

The Liechtensteiner Fussballverbund voted Rainer Hasler to be their "Golden Player" — their best player over the last 50 years — to mark UEFA's golden jubilee.

In the 2010 World Cup qualifiers, Liechtenstein secured a scoreless draw against Azerbaijan and a 1–1 draw against Finland, finishing bottom of Group 4 on two points.[4]

In the Euro 2012 qualifiers, Liechtenstein were narrowly beaten 2–1 by Scotland in Hampden Park thanks to a goal by Stephen McManus in the seventh minute of additional time.[5] They produced a shock 2–0 win at home against Lithuania; their goals were scored by Philippe Erne and Michele Polverino.[5] In the following qualifying game, they managed a scoreless draw away to Lithuania.[5]

In 2018, Liechtenstein entered the first ever UEFA Nations League, in group 4 of league D.[6] Their first Nations League match saw Armenia beat them 2–0 away. Liechtenstein were able to claim their first Nations League victory, beating Gibraltar 2–0.[7]

Liechtenstein all-time record against all nationsEdit

Competitive recordEdit

World Cup recordEdit

Year Round Position W D L GF GA
  1930 to   1994 Did not enter
  1998 Did not qualify 6th, last (qualifying) 0 0 10 3 52
    2002 5th, last (qualifying) 0 0 8 0 23
  2006 6th out of 7 (qualifying) 2 2 8 13 23
  2010 6th, last (qualifying) 0 2 8 2 23
  2014 6th, last (qualifying) 0 2 8 4 25
  2018 6th, last (qualifying) 0 0 10 1 39
  2022 To be determined To be determined
      2026 To be determined To be determined
Total 0/21 2 6 52 23 185

European Championship recordEdit

Year Round Position W D L GF GA
  1960 to   1992 Did not enter
  1996 Did not qualify 6th, last (qualifying) 0 1 9 1 40
    2000 6th, last (qualifying) 1 1 8 2 39
  2004 5th, last (qualifying) 0 1 7 2 22
    2008 7th, last (qualifying) 2 1 9 9 32
    2012 5th, last (qualifying) 1 1 6 3 17
  2016 5th out of 6 (qualifying) 1 2 7 2 26
  2020 6th, last (qualifying) 0 2 8 2 31
Total 0/16 5 9 54 20 190

Recent results and forthcoming fixturesEdit

2019Edit

5 September 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifyingBosnia and Herzegovina  5–0  LiechtensteinZenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina
20:45
Report Stadium: Bilino Polje Stadium
Referee: Glenn Nyberg (Sweden)
8 September 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifyingGreece  1–1  LiechtensteinHeraklion, Greece
20:45
Report
Stadium: Pankritio Stadium
Referee: Alexander Harkam (Austria)
12 October 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifyingLiechtenstein  1–1  ArmeniaVaduz, Liechtenstein
20:45
Report
Stadium: Rheinpark Stadion
Referee: István Kovács (Romania)
15 October 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifyingLiechtenstein  0–5  ItalyVaduz, Liechtenstein
20:45 CEST (UTC+02:00) Report
Stadium: Rheinpark Stadion
Referee: Andris Treimanis (Latvia)
15 November 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifyingFinland  3–0  LiechtensteinHelsinki, Finland
18:00
Report Stadium: Telia 5G Areena
Referee: Benoît Bastien (France)

2020Edit

7 October 2020 (2020-10-07) FriendlyLuxembourg  v  LiechtensteinLuxembourg City, Luxembourg
TBD Stadium: Stade Josy Barthel
11 November 2020 (2020-11-11) FriendlyMalta  v  LiechtensteinTa' Qali, Malta
TBD Stadium: National Stadium, Ta' Qali

2020 UEFA European Championship qualificationEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification            
1   Italy 10 10 0 0 37 4 +33 30 Qualify for final tournament 2–0 2–0 2–1 9–1 6–0
2   Finland 10 6 0 4 16 10 +6 18 1–2 1–0 2–0 3–0 3–0
3   Greece 10 4 2 4 12 14 −2 14 0–3 2–1 2–1 2–3 1–1
4   Bosnia and Herzegovina 10 4 1 5 20 17 +3 13 0–3 4–1 2–2 2–1 5–0
5   Armenia 10 3 1 6 14 25 −11 10 1–3 0–2 0–1 4–2 3–0
6   Liechtenstein 10 0 2 8 2 31 −29 2 0–5 0–2 0–2 0–3 1–1
Source: UEFA

Manager historyEdit

 
Helgi Kolviðsson, the team manager since 2018.

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

The following players were called up for the UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying matches against Finland and Bosnia and Herzegovina on 15 and 18 November 2019 respectively.[8]
Caps and goals are current as of 18 November 2019 after the match against Bosnia and Herzegovina.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Benjamin Büchel (1989-07-04) 4 July 1989 (age 31) 29 0   Vaduz
21 1GK Lorenzo Lo Russo (1993-07-08) 8 July 1993 (age 27) 0 0   Linth 04
12 1GK Justin Ospelt (1999-09-07) 7 September 1999 (age 20) 0 0   Vaduz

15 2DF Seyhan Yildiz (1989-04-30) 30 April 1989 (age 31) 37 1   Balzers
20 2DF Sandro Wolfinger (1991-08-24) 24 August 1991 (age 28) 33 2   Eschen/Mauren
3 2DF Maximilian Göppel (1997-08-31) 31 August 1997 (age 22) 30 1   Vaduz
2 2DF Daniel Brändle (1992-01-23) 23 January 1992 (age 28) 27 0   Pullach
6 2DF Andreas Malin (1994-01-31) 31 January 1994 (age 26) 19 0   Dornbirn
2DF Jens Hofer (1997-10-01) 1 October 1997 (age 22) 6 0   Vaduz

13 3MF Martin Büchel (Captain) (1987-02-19) 19 February 1987 (age 33) 82 2   Red Star Zürich
17 3MF Robin Gubser (1991-04-17) 17 April 1991 (age 29) 38 1   Eschen/Mauren
8 3MF Aron Sele (1996-09-02) 2 September 1996 (age 23) 19 0   Vaduz
14 3MF Livio Meier (1998-01-10) 10 January 1998 (age 22) 12 0   Eschen/Mauren
19 3MF Philipp Ospelt (1992-10-07) 7 October 1992 (age 27) 4 0   Eschen/Mauren
5 3MF Noah Frommelt (2000-12-18) 18 December 2000 (age 19) 1 0   Balzers
7 3MF Ridvan Kardesoglu (1996-10-12) 12 October 1996 (age 23) 1 0   Chur 97
16 3MF Fabio Wolfinger (1996-11-05) 5 November 1996 (age 23) 1 0   Eschen/Mauren
4 3MF Marco Wolfinger (1989-04-18) 18 April 1989 (age 31) 0 0   Balzers

18 4FW Nicolas Hasler (1991-05-04) 4 May 1991 (age 29) 67 3   Thun
11 4FW Dennis Salanović (1996-02-26) 26 February 1996 (age 24) 41 4   Thun
9 4FW Yanik Frick (1998-05-27) 27 May 1998 (age 22) 11 1   Rapperswil-Jona
10 4FW Noah Frick (2001-10-16) 16 October 2001 (age 18) 2 0   Vaduz

Recent call-upsEdit

The following players were called up in the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Claudio Majer (1996-03-23) 23 March 1996 (age 24) 0 0   Eschen/Mauren v.   Italy, 15 October 2019

DF Daniel Kaufmann (1990-12-22) 22 December 1990 (age 29) 57 1   Balzers v.   Italy, 15 October 2019
DF Fabian Eberle (1992-07-27) 27 July 1992 (age 28) 7 0   Konolfingen v.   Italy, 15 October 2019

MF Sandro Wieser (1993-02-03) 3 February 1993 (age 27) 53 2   Vaduz v.   Greece, 8 September 2019
MF Simon Kühne (1994-04-30) April 30, 1994 (age 26) 22 0   Eschen/Mauren v.   Greece, 8 September 2019

Notes:

  • PRE = Preliminary squad
  • INJ = Injured

Player historyEdit

Peter Jehle (left) is Liechtenstein's most capped player, and Mario Frick their all-time record goalscorer and second most capped player.
As of 18 November 2019

Most capped playersEdit

Rank Player Caps Goals Years
1 Peter Jehle 132 0 1998–2018
2 Mario Frick 125 16 1993–2015
3 Martin Stocklasa 113 5 1996–2014
4 Franz Burgmeier 112 9 2001–2018
5 Thomas Beck 92 5 1998–2013
6 Martin Büchel 82 2 2004–
7 Daniel Hasler 81 1 1993–2007
8 Michele Polverino 79 6 2007–2019
9 Martin Telser 73 1 1996–2007
10 Ronny Büchel 72 0 1998–2010

Top goalscorersEdit

Rank Player Caps Goals Years
1 Mario Frick 125 16 1993–2015
2 Franz Burgmeier 112 9 2001–2018
3 Michele Polverino 79 6 2007–2019
4 Martin Stocklasa 113 5 1996–2014
Thomas Beck 92 5 1998–2013
6 Dennis Salanović 41 4 2014–
7 Nicolas Hasler 67 3 2010–
8 Martin Büchel 82 2 2004–
Michael Stocklasa 71 2 1998–2012
Sandro Wieser 53 2 2008–
Fabio D'Elia 50 2 2001–2010
Mathias Christen 36 2 2008–2014
Sandro Wolfinger 33 2 2013–
Benjamin Fischer 23 2 2005–2011

In literatureEdit

Prompted by the team's poor record in competitive games, British writer Charlie Connelly followed the entire qualifying campaign for the 2002 FIFA World Cup. As recorded in the subsequent book Stamping Grounds: Liechtenstein's Quest for the World Cup, Liechtenstein lost all eight games without scoring a goal.[9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking". FIFA. 16 July 2020. Retrieved 16 July 2020.
  2. ^ Elo rankings change compared to one year ago. "World Football Elo Ratings". eloratings.net. 1 August 2020. Retrieved 1 August 2020.
  3. ^ Ltd, Allied Newspapers. "Malta beat Liechtenstein 7-1". Times of Malta. Retrieved 2018-11-07.
  4. ^ "Liechtenstein and Finland football teams played to a 1:1 draw, 9 September 2009". eu-football.info. Retrieved 2018-11-07.
  5. ^ a b c "Liechtenstein missing goal hero Philippe Erne". BBC Sport. BBC. 27 September 2011. Retrieved 27 September 2011.
  6. ^ UEFA.com. "UEFA Nations League - Standings". UEFA.com. Retrieved 2018-11-07.
  7. ^ "UEFA league D4".
  8. ^ https://www.lfv.li/fileadmin/user_upload/Dateien/Nationalmannschaften/A-Nationalmannschaft/Aufgebote-Nationalmannschaft/2019/Aufgebot_WOF-November.pdf
  9. ^ Stamping Grounds : Exploring Liechtenstein and its World Cup Dream. 2014-06-11. ISBN 9780349141121.

External linksEdit