Portugal national football team

The Portugal national football team (Portuguese: Seleção Portuguesa de Futebol) has represented Portugal in international men's football competition since 1921. The national team is controlled by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF), the governing body for football in Portugal. Portugal's home matches are played at various stadiums throughout Portugal, and its primary training ground and technical headquarters, Cidade do Futebol, is located in Oeiras. The current head coach of the team is Fernando Santos and the captain is Cristiano Ronaldo, who also holds the team record for most caps and for most goals.

Portugal
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)A Seleção (The Selection)
Os Navegadores (The Navigators)
AssociationPortuguese Football Federation
(Federação Portuguesa de Futebol, FPF)
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachFernando Santos
CaptainCristiano Ronaldo
Most capsCristiano Ronaldo (189)
Top scorerCristiano Ronaldo (117)
Home stadiumVarious
FIFA codePOR
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 9 Decrease 1 (23 June 2022)[1]
Highest2 (May–June 2010, October 2012, April–June 2014, September 2017 – April 2018)
Lowest25 (August 1998)
First international
 Spain 3–1 Portugal 
(Madrid, Spain; 19 December 1921)
Biggest win
 Portugal 8–0 Liechtenstein 
(Lisbon, Portugal; 18 November 1994)
 Portugal 8–0 Liechtenstein 
(Coimbra, Portugal; 9 June 1999)
 Portugal 8–0 Kuwait 
(Leiria, Portugal; 19 November 2003)
Biggest defeat
 Portugal 0–10 England 
(Lisbon, Portugal; 25 May 1947)
World Cup
Appearances8 (first in 1966)
Best resultThird place (1966)
European Championship
Appearances8 (first in 1984)
Best resultChampions (2016)
Nations League Finals
Appearances1 (first in 2019)
Best resultChampions (2019)
FIFA Confederations Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2017)
Best resultThird place (2017)
Websitefpf.pt

Portugal's first participation in a major tournament finals was at the 1966 World Cup, which saw a team featuring Ballon d'Or winner Eusébio finish in third place. Portugal also made it to the semi-finals of the UEFA Euro 1984, losing to hosts and eventual winners France. Under the team's first golden generation in the 1990s, Portugal began consistently been present in all the final stages of major tournaments, reaching the semi-finals of Euro 2000, the Euro 2004 final, which they lost to Greece on home soil, and the semi-finals of the 2006 World Cup, finishing in fourth place, the best result of the country in the World Cup since 1966. This was in great part due to the production of several players, such as Luís Figo, Rui Costa, Ricardo Carvalho, and Cristiano Ronaldo, who is regarded as one of the greatest players of all time.[3][4]

In 2014, Fernando Santos was appointed as the new head coach for the national team. Two years later at Euro 2016, Santos led Portugal to its first ever major trophy, defeating hosts France in the final. With the win, Portugal qualified and made its only appearance in the FIFA Confederations Cup held in Russia, where they finished in third place. Portugal qualified for and hosted the brand new 2018–19 Nations League Finals where they triumphed, defeating the Netherlands and earning the second major tournament victory in three finals.

Portugal is colloquially referred to as the Seleção das Quinas (a synecdoche based on the flag of the country) and has notable rivalries with Brazil, due to shared cultural traits and heritage,[5] France, due to several important meetings between the two teams at Euros and World Cups, and Spain, known as A Guerra Ibérica in Portuguese or "The Iberian War" in English, with the rivalry between two countries going back to 1581.[6]

History

Early World Cup attempts

Portugal was not invited to the 1930 World Cup, which only featured a final stage and no qualification round. The team took part in the 1934 FIFA World Cup qualification, but failed to eliminate their Spanish opponents, aggregating two defeats in the two-legged round, with a 9–0 loss in Madrid and 2–1 loss in Lisbon for an aggregate score of 11–1.[7][8]

In the 1938 FIFA World Cup qualification, the Seleção played one game against Syria held in neutral ground in Milan. They lost 2–1 and failed to qualify for the finals.[9] Because of the international conflict due to the World War II, there was no World Cup held until the 1950 competition and subsequently, the national team made very few games against other teams.[10] A 10–0 home friendly loss against England, two years after the war, still stands as their biggest ever defeat.[11]

1950s and early 1960s

On the restart of games, the team was to play a two-legged round against Spain, just like in the 1934 qualification. After a 5–1 defeat in Madrid, they managed to draw in the second game 2–2 and so the qualification ended with a 7–3 aggregate score. While they did not qualify on the pitch, they would later be invited to replace Turkey, which had withdrawn from participating; however, Portugal too refused to participate.[12][13]

For the qualification of the 1954 World Cup, the team would play Austria. The Austrians won the first game with a 9–1 result.[14] The best the national team could do was hold the Austrians to a goalless draw in Lisbon, and the round ended with a 9–1 aggregate defeat.[15]

In the 1958 qualification, Portugal won a qualification match for the first time, a 3–0 home victory over Italy. Nevertheless, they finished last in the group stage that also featured Northern Ireland; only the first-placed team, Northern Ireland, would qualify.[16]

The year 1960 was the year that UEFA created the European Football Championship. The first edition was a knock-out tournament, the last four teams participating in the final stage that only featured one leg while the earlier stages had two legs. In the first round, the Seleção das Quinas won 2–0 at East Germany and then 3–2 in Porto, advancing with a 5–2 two-legged win.[17][18] The quarter-final opponent was Yugoslavia. Despite winning the first game 2–1, they lost the second leg 5–1 in Belgrade, losing 6–3 on aggregate.[19]

England and Luxembourg were the 1962 FIFA World Cup qualification adversaries of the national team. Portugal ended second in the group, behind England. Like in the previous World Cup qualification, only the team that topped the group would qualify.[20]

In the 1964 European Championship, Portugal played against Bulgaria in the qualifying rounds. The Portuguese lost in Sofia and won in Lisbon. With the round tied 4–4, a replay was needed in a neutral country.[21] In the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, Portugal lost 1–0 thanks to a late strike from Georgi Asparuhov.[21]

1966 World Cup and 1970s

In the 1966 World Cup qualification, Portugal was drawn into the same group as Czechoslovakia, Romania and Turkey.[22] They topped the group with only one draw and one defeat during all the six games and finally qualified for a FIFA World Cup, that year the final stage would be held in England. Notable results were both 1–0 away wins against Czechoslovakia and Turkey and a 5–1 home win against the Turks.[22]

The team started out with three wins in the group stage where they were in Group C when they beat Hungary 3–1,[23] Bulgaria 3–0, and two-time defending champions Brazil 3–1.[24] Secondly, they beat surprise quarter-finalist North Korea 5–3, with Eusébio getting four markers to overturn a 3–0 deficit.[25] Later, they reached the semi-finals where they were beaten by hosts England 2–1; in this game, Portugal would have played in Liverpool, but as England were the hosts, FIFA decided that the game should have been in the English capital, which led the Portuguese team travel unexpectedly from Liverpool to London.[26] Portugal then defeated the Soviet Union 2–1 in the third place match for their best World Cup finish to date.[27] Eusébio was the top scorer of the World Cup with nine goals.

In the Euro 1972 qualifiers, Portugal had to top its group that comprised the teams of Belgium, Denmark and Scotland to advance to the finals.[28][29] Portugal finished second to Belgium.[30]

For the 1974 World Cup qualification stages, Portugal were unable to defeat Bulgaria (drawing 2–2) in the decisive match, and thus failed to qualify.[31] Portugal faced tough competition from the strong Poland team for the place in the 1978 World Cup in Argentina.[32][33] They finished second place, behind Poland.[34]

Late 1970s, 1980s and early 1990s

Portugal was put alongside Austria, Belgium, Norway and Scotland to fight for the first spot in the group, which would allow them to go to the final stage of UEFA Euro 1980. Portugal took third place.[30]

 
Luís Figo playing for Portugal at the 2006 FIFA World Cup

For the 1982 qualification, the Portuguese team had to face Israel, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden for the top two group places.[35] Portugal finished in fourth place.[35]

During the qualifying campaign for Euro 1984, Portugal was grouped with Finland, Poland and the Soviet Union. Portugal won the group with a win over the Soviet Union.[36][37] Portugal ended in Group B, alongside Spain, West Germany and Romania.[38] In the first two matches, they tied 0–0 and 1–1 against West Germany and Spain, respectively.[38] A 1–0 win over Romania gave them second place in the group, to go through to the knockout stage, where they were matched against the hosts, France.[38] The game was tied after 90 minutes and went into extra time; Portugal made the score 2–1, but France scored in the 114th and 119th minutes to eliminate Portugal 3–2 and go through to the final.[38]

For the 1986 tournament, the Seleção played against Czechoslovakia, Malta, Sweden and West Germany for the two spots that would guarantee them a ticket to Mexico.[39] Needing a win in the last game against West Germany in Stuttgart, Portugal won the game to become the first team to beat West Germany at their home ground in an official match. The team exited early in the group stages after a win and two losses.[40] They started with a 1–0 win to England,[41] but later were beaten by Poland and Morocco 1–0 and 3–1 respectively.[42][43] Their staying in Mexico was marked by the Saltillo Affair, where players refused to train in order to win more prizes from the Portuguese Football Federation.

For the UEFA Euro 1988 the Portuguese team attempted to top their qualifying group in a group with Italy, Malta, Sweden and Switzerland; however, they finished in third.[44][45]

The 1990 World Cup qualification was in a group along with Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Luxembourg and Switzerland, Portugal fought to get one of the first two spots of the group.[46] Playing at home against Czechoslovakia, the game ended in a 0–0 allowing the Central Europeans to get the second place.[47]

During the draws for the Euro 1992 qualifying, the Netherlands, Greece, Finland and Malta were the other teams, ending in second behind the Dutch.[48]

For the 1994 World Cup qualification, Portugal played in the same group as Estonia, Italy, Malta, Scotland and Switzerland for the two highest places.[49] They ended in third behind Italy and Switzerland.[49]

1995 to 2006: The golden generation

At UEFA Euro 1996, Portugal finished first in Group D, and in the quarter-finals, they lost 1–0 to the Czech Republic. This team was known as the Golden generation, a group of youngsters who had won the FIFA U-20 World Cup in 1989 and 1991 and were now leading the national senior squad; they also reached the semi-finals of UEFA Euro 2000 but were eliminated in the group stage of the 2002 FIFA World Cup despite high reputations.[50]

 
Portugal lost the Euro 2004 final 0–1 to Greece with a header from Angelos Charisteas (pictured).

Portugal failed to qualify for the 1998 FIFA World Cup. In Euro 2000 qualifying, Portugal finished second in their group, one point short of first-placed Romania. However, after finishing as the top runner-up nation in qualifying, Portugal nonetheless secured passage to the tournament final stage. They then defeated England 3–2, Romania 1–0 and Germany 3–0 to finish first in Group A, then defeated Turkey in the quarter-finals. In the semi-final against France, Portugal were eliminated in extra time when Zinedine Zidane converted a penalty. Referee Günter Benkö awarded the spot kick for a handball after Abel Xavier blocked a shot. Xavier, Nuno Gomes and Paulo Bento were all given lengthy suspensions for subsequently shoving the referee.[51] The final result was 2–1.

During 2002 FIFA World Cup qualifying, Portugal won the group.[52] Several problems and poor judgement decisions occurred during the preparation and tournament itself – shopping sprees by players were widely reported in the Portuguese press.[52] Questionable managing choices and some amateurism, including the same lack of agreement on prizes.[52] Portugal entered the tournament as favourites to win Group D.[52] However, they were upset 3–2 by the United States.[52] They then rebounded with a 4–0 smashing of Poland.[52] Needing a draw to advance, they lost the final group game to hosts South Korea.[53] Portugal underachieved and ended third in its group stage, subsequently eliminated. Manager António Oliveira was fired after the World Cup.

 
Ronaldo, pictured playing against Germany at Euro 2012, assumed the captaincy in the wake of Euro 2008.

The next major competition, the UEFA Euro 2004, was held in Portugal. On the preparation, the Football Federation made a contract with Luiz Felipe Scolari to manage the team until the tournament ended.[54] The Portuguese team entered the tournament being a favourite to win it.[citation needed] The host nation lost the first game against Greece 1–2.[55] They got their first win against Russia 2–0 and also beat Spain 1–0.[56][57] They went on to play against England, in a 2–2 draw that went into penalties, with Portugal winning.[58] Portugal beat the Netherlands 2–1 in the semi-final.[59] They were beaten by Greece 1–0 in the final.[60]

After the tournament ended, a lot of players belonging to the Geração de Ouro (Golden Generation), abandoned their international footballing careers, with only Luís Figo remaining in the team, despite a temporary retirement.[61][62]

The silver lining for Portugal was the emergence of Cristiano Ronaldo. Ronaldo was selected in the UEFA Euro All Stars Team.[63] While Portugal was playing in the competition, Scolari agreed in a new two-year deal with the Federation.

Portugal finished first in the qualifying round for the 2006 World Cup.[64] Portugal finished first place in Group D of the World Cup, with victories over Angola (1–0), Iran (2–0) and Mexico (2–1).[65][66] Portugal defeated the Netherlands 1–0 in the Round of 16 in Nuremberg in an acrimonious match marked by 16 yellow cards, with four players sent off.[67] Portugal drew 0–0 after extra-time with England, but won 3–1 on penalties to reach their first World Cup semi-final since 1966.[68][69] Portugal lost 1–0 against France in the semi-finals.[70] Portugal faced Germany in the third place play-off match in a 3–1 defeat.[71]

Ultimately, the team won the "Most Entertaining Team" award for their play during the World Cup. Once again Scolari was asked to accept a new deal with the Federation that would maintain with as the manager until the end of the next competition.

2006 to 2014: Post-golden generation and mixed results

For Euro 2008 Portugal finished second in qualification behind Poland,[72] and won their first two group games against Turkey and the Czech Republic, although a loss to co-hosts Switzerland set up a quarter-final matchup with Germany which the team lost 3–2.[73] After the tournament, Scolari left to take over at Chelsea.[74] Afterwards, Carlos Queiroz was appointed as the head coach of the Portugal national team.[75][76][77][78]

Portugal came second in the qualifying stages for the 2010 FIFA World Cup under Carlos Queiroz, then beat Bosnia and Herzegovina in a play-off, thereby reaching every tournament in the decade.[79][80][81] A 19-match undefeated streak, in which the team conceded only three goals, ended with a loss to eventual champions Spain in the round of 16, 1–0.[82] Queiroz was later criticized for setting up his team in an overly cautious way.[83] After the World Cup, squad regulars Simão, Paulo Ferreira, Miguel and Tiago all retired from international football.[84][85][86] Queiroz was banned from coaching the national team for one month after he tried to block a doping test to the team while preparing for the World Cup, as well as directing insulting words to the testers.[87] In consequence, he received a further six-month suspension. Several media outbursts from Queiroz[88] against the heads of the Portuguese Football Federation followed, which partly prompted his dismissal. Paulo Bento was appointed as his replacement at head coach.[89]

Bento's team qualified for Euro 2012, They were drawn with Germany, Denmark, and the Netherlands in a widely speculated "group of death".[90][91][92][93] They lost their first game 0–1 to Germany, then beat Denmark 3–2.[94][95] The final group stage match was against the Netherlands. After Van der Vaart had given the Dutch a 1–0 lead, Ronaldo netted twice to ensure a 2–1 victory.[96][97][98] Portugal finished second in the group and qualified for the knockout phase. Portugal defeated the Czech Republic 1–0 in the quarter-finals with a header from Ronaldo.[99] The semi-final match was against Spain. The game ended 0–0 and Portugal lost 4–2 on penalties.[100]

In 2014 FIFA World Cup qualifying, Portugal won 4–2 on aggregate in a play-off against Sweden with all four goals being scored by Ronaldo, and was drawn into Group G with the United States, Germany and Ghana. Their first match against the Germans was their worst-ever defeat in a World Cup, a 4–0 loss.[101] They went on to draw 2–2 against the United States and won 2–1 against Ghana.[102][103] However, the team were eliminated due to inferior goal difference to the Americans.[104]

2014–present: Euro 2016 and first international glories

Portugal began the Euro 2016 qualifiers with a 0–1 home defeat against Albania, which resulted in Bento being dismissed from his managerial post to be replaced by Fernando Santos in September 2014.[105] Under Santos, the team qualified as group winners and were drawn in Group F alongside newcomers Iceland, Austria and Hungary; the Portuguese advanced into the knockout stage as the third-best third place team following three straight draws. Portugal beat Croatia 1–0 in the Round of 16 after a goal from Ricardo Quaresma in extra time[106] and then defeated Poland 5–3 on penalties to reach the semi-finals,[107] where they defeated Wales 2–0 in regulation time with goals from Ronaldo and Nani to reach the final at the Stade de France against hosts France.[108] The early stages of the final saw Ronaldo limp off the pitch injured; in extra time, substitute Eder turned hero when he scored the match's only goal in the 109th minute, defying all odds.[109][110] Ronaldo won the Silver Boot, scoring three goals and providing three assists.[111][112]

Following their Euro 2016 victory, Portugal participated in the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup. Portugal faced Mexico on 17 June in their opening match, which ended in a 2–2 draw.[113] Three days later, Portugal faced hosts Russia 1–0 winning effort, with the only goal of the match being scored by Cristiano Ronaldo.[114] On 24 June, Portugal defeated New Zealand 4–0 to top their group and advance to the semi-finals of the competition.[115][116] Ronaldo was also man of the match in all three of Portugal's group stage matches.[117] Portugal lost to Chile on penalties after a goalless draw in the semi-finals,[118] but rebounded in the third place game, defeating Mexico 2–1 after extra time.[119]

 
Portugal lining up before a match at the 2018 FIFA World Cup

In the 2018 FIFA World Cup preliminary draw, Portugal were placed in Group B along with Switzerland, Hungary, Faroe Islands, Andorra and Latvia. Portugal would only lose one match against Switzerland 2–0. However, Portugal got their revenge on their last group stage match defeating Switzerland 2–0, to top their group and qualify for the 2018 World Cup.

In the 2018 FIFA World Cup, Portugal were drawn into Group B with Spain, Morocco and Iran. In their opening match on 15 June, Portugal were against Spain, which ended in a 3–3 draw, with Cristiano Ronaldo scoring a hat-trick.[120] Ronaldo scored the only goal in a 1–0 victory against Morocco, breaking Puskás' record.[121] Portugal faced Iran on 25 June, in their final group match, which ended in a 1–1 draw, leading Portugal to progress to the knockout round as group runners-up behind Spain.[122] On 30 June, Portugal were eliminated following a 2–1 defeat to Uruguay in the round of 16.[123]

 
Gonçalo Guedes, who scored the winning goal against the Netherlands in the 2019 UEFA Nations League Final

Following the World Cup, Portugal was part of the inaugural UEFA Nations League, were the Seleção were placed in league A and were drawn into Group 3 with Italy and Poland. On 9 March 2018, UEFA announced that Portugal had expressed interest in bidding for the Nations League finals, which was later announced that the group winners would be appointed as the host.[124] Portugal started the league defeating Italy in a home 1–0 victory, with André Silva scoring the match's only goal.[125] In their second match, Portugal defeated Poland in a 3–2 away victory.[126][127] In the two remaining matches, Portugal faced Italy and Poland in a 0–0 away draw and Poland 1–1 home, respectively, to advance to the Nations League finals, thereby automatically winning hosting rights, which were confirmed by the UEFA Executive Committee on 3 December 2018.[128] In the semi-finals on 5 June 2019, Cristiano Ronaldo made his return to the team scoring a hat-trick against Switzerland to secure the hosts a spot in the final.[129] Four days later, in the finals at the Estádio do Dragão in Porto, Portugal defeated the Netherlands 1–0, with the only being scored by Gonçalo Guedes in the 60th minute.[130][131]

Portugal was drawn in Group B for the UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying with Lithuania, Luxembourg, Ukraine, and Serbia. Portugal won five games, drew two and lost one to qualify for the final tournament from the second place. In the process, Fernando Santos overtook Luiz Felipe Scolari's record as Portugal's coach with the most victories overall. Santos' team was drawn with France, Germany and Hungary in a widely speculated "group of death". Portugal advanced to the next round by defeating Hungary, drawing with France and losing to Germany. There, they faced Belgium and lost 0–1, finishing 13th overall, which is Portugal's lowest placement in Euros history.

Portugal was drawn into Group A of the 2022 FIFA World Cup qualifiers with Azerbaijan, Luxembourg, Republic of Ireland, and Serbia. After losing to Serbia at home on the final matchday, Portugal finished second and advanced to the playoffs as opposed to qualifying directly.[132] On 24 March 2022, Portugal beat Turkey 3–1 in the playoff semi-final,[133] and five days later they defeated North Macedonia 2–0 in the playoff final to secure a berth in the 2022 FIFA World Cup.[134]

Team image

Kits

Portugal's traditional home kit is mainly red with a green trim, reflecting the colors of the nation's flag. Over the years, the particular shade of red has alternated between a darker burgundy and a lighter scarlet. Both green and red shorts have been used to complete the strip.

The team's away kits, on the other hand, have varied more considerably. White has typically been preferred as a dominant color, either with blue shorts, or red and green highlights. In recent times, all-black has been utilized, as has a turquoise-teal color, the latter of which was prominently featured during the title-winning Euro 2016 campaign.

Media coverage

Portugal's qualifying, Nations League and friendly matches are broadcast by free-to-air public broadcaster RTP and pay-TV network Sport TV.[citation needed]

Coaching staff

Position Name
Head Coach   Fernando Santos
Assistant Coach   Ilídio Vale[135]
Assistant Coach   Nuno Sampaio[135]
Assistant Coach   Fernando Meira[135]
Goalkeeping Coach   Rui Ouriques[135]

Coaching history

As of 29 March 2022
Manager Years Played Won Drawn Lost Win %
  Committee 1921–1923 3 0 0 3 0.00
  Ribeiro dos Reis[136] 1925–1926 5 1 0 4 20.00
  Cândido de Oliveira[136] 1926–1929, 1935–1945, 1952 28 6 9 13 21.43
  Maia Loureiro 1929 1 0 0 1 0.00
  Laurindo Grijó 1930 4 2 0 2 50.00
  Tavares da Silva[136] 1931, 1945–1947, 1951, 1955–1957 29 10 4 15 34.48
  Salvador do Carmo 1932–1933, 1950, 1953–1954 12 3 4 5 25.00
  Virgílio Paula 1947–1948 3 1 0 2 33.33
  Armando Sampaio 1949 4 1 1 2 25.00
  José Maria Antunes 1957–1960, 1962–1964, 1968–1969 31 9 4 18 29.03
  Armando Ferreira 1961, 1962 6 1 1 4 16.67
  Fernando Peyroteo 1961 2 0 0 2 0.00
  Manuel da Luz Afonso 1964–1966 20 15 2 3 75.00
  José Gomes da Silva 1967, 1970–1971 13 5 4 4 38.46
  José Augusto 1972–1973 15 9 4 2 60.00
  José Maria Pedroto[136] 1974–1976 15 6 4 5 40.00
  Juca 1977–1978, 1980–1982, 1987–1989 34 15 7 12 44.12
  Mário Wilson 1978–1980 10 5 2 3 50.00
  Otto Glória 1964–1966, 1982–1983 7 3 1 3 42.86
  Fernando Cabrita 1983–1984 9 5 2 2 55.56
  José Augusto Torres 1984–1986 17 8 1 8 47.06
  Ruy Seabra 1986–1987 6 1 4 1 16.67
  Artur Jorge 1990–1991, 1996–1997 26 11 10 5 42.31
  Carlos Queiroz 1991–1993, 2008–2010 50 25 17 8 50.00
  Nelo Vingada 1994 2 0 2 0 0.00
  António Oliveira[136] 1994–1996, 2000–2002 43 25 10 8 58.14
  Humberto Coelho 1997–2000 24 16 4 4 66.67
  Agostinho Oliveira 2002–2003 7 2 3 2 28.57
  Luiz Felipe Scolari 2003–2008 74 42 18 14 56.76
  Paulo Bento 2010–2014 44 24 11 9 54.55
  Fernando Santos 2014– 99 61 23 15 62.88

Results and fixtures

2021

27 June 2021 UEFA Euro 2020 R16 Belgium   1–0   Portugal Seville, Spain
21:00 CEST (UTC+02:00)
  • T. Hazard   42'
Report Stadium: La Cartuja
Attendance: 11,504
Referee: Felix Brych (Germany)
1 September 2021 (2021-09-01) 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Portugal   2–1   Republic of Ireland Faro/Loulé, Portugal
19:45 WEST (UTC+01:00)
Report
Stadium: Estádio Algarve
Attendance: 7,831
Referee: Matej Jug (Slovenia)
4 September 2021 (2021-09-04) Friendly Qatar   1–3   Portugal Debrecen, Hungary
18:45 CEST (UTC+02:00)
Report
Report (UEFA)
Stadium: Nagyerdei Stadion
Referee: Gergő Bogár (Hungary)
7 September 2021 (2021-09-07) 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Azerbaijan   0–3   Portugal Baku, Azerbaijan
20:00 AZT (UTC+04:00) Report
Stadium: Olympic Stadium
Attendance: 20,574
Referee: Marco Guida (Italy)
9 October 2021 (2021-10-09) Friendly Portugal   3–0   Qatar Faro/Loulé, Portugal
20:15 WEST (UTC+01:00)
Report
Report (UEFA)
Stadium: Estádio Algarve
Referee: Fedayi San (Switzerland)
12 October 2021 (2021-10-12) 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Portugal   5–0   Luxembourg Faro/Loulé, Portugal
19:45 WEST (UTC+01:00)
Report Stadium: Estádio Algarve
Attendance: 18,553
Referee: Benoît Bastien (France)
11 November 2021 (2021-11-11) 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Republic of Ireland   0–0   Portugal Dublin, Republic of Ireland
19:45 GMT (UTC±00:00) Report Stadium: Aviva Stadium
Attendance: 50,737
Referee: Jesús Gil Manzano (Spain)
14 November 2021 (2021-11-14) 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Portugal   1–2   Serbia Lisbon, Portugal
19:45 WET (UTC±00:00)
Report
Stadium: Estádio da Luz
Attendance: 58,873
Referee: Daniele Orsato (Italy)

2022

24 March 2022 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification play-off Portugal   3–1   Turkey Porto, Portugal
20:45 CET (UTC+01:00)
Report
Stadium: Estádio do Dragão
Referee: Daniel Siebert (Germany)
29 March 2022 (2022-03-29) 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification play-off Portugal   2–0   North Macedonia Porto, Portugal
20:45 CET (UTC+01:00)
Report Stadium: Estádio do Dragão
Referee: Anthony Taylor (England)
2 June 2022 2022 UEFA NL Spain   1–1   Portugal Seville, Spain
20:45
Report
Stadium: Benito Villamarín
Attendance: 41,236
Referee: Michael Oliver (England)
5 June 2022 2022 UEFA NL Portugal   4–0    Switzerland Lisbon, Portugal
19:45
Report Stadium: Estádio José Alvalade
Attendance: 42,325
Referee: Orel Grinfeeld (Israel)
9 June 2022 2022 UEFA NL Portugal   2–0   Czech Republic Lisbon, Portugal
19:45
Report Stadium: Estádio José Alvalade
Attendance: 44,100
Referee: Matej Jug (Slovenia)
12 June 2022 2022 UEFA NL Switzerland    1–0   Portugal Geneva, Switzerland
20:45
Report Stadium: Stade de Genève
Attendance: 26,300
Referee: Fran Jović (Croatia)
24 September 2022 2022 UEFA NL Czech Republic   v   Portugal Prague, Czech Republic
20:45 Stadium: Sinobo Stadium
27 September 2022 2022 UEFA NL Portugal   v   Spain Braga, Portugal
19:45 Stadium: Estádio Municipal
24 November 2022 2022 FIFA WC Portugal   v   Ghana Doha, Qatar
19:00 AST (UTC+03:00) Stadium: Stadium 974
28 November 2022 2022 FIFA WC Portugal   v   Uruguay Lusail, Qatar
22:00 AST (UTC+03:00) Stadium: Lusail Iconic Stadium
2 December 2022 2022 FIFA WC South Korea   v   Portugal Al Rayyan, Qatar
18:00 AST (UTC+03:00) Stadium: Education City Stadium

Players

Current squad

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Rui Patrício (1988-02-15) 15 February 1988 (age 34) 104 0   Roma
12 1GK Rui Silva (1994-02-07) 7 February 1994 (age 28) 1 0   Betis
22 1GK Diogo Costa (1999-09-19) 19 September 1999 (age 22) 5 0   Porto

2 2DF Diogo Dalot (1999-03-18) 18 March 1999 (age 23) 5 0   Manchester United
3 2DF Pepe (vice-captain) (1983-02-26) 26 February 1983 (age 39) 128 7   Porto
4 2DF Domingos Duarte (1995-03-10) 10 March 1995 (age 27) 3 0   Granada
5 2DF David Carmo (1999-07-19) 19 July 1999 (age 22) 0 0   Braga
13 2DF Danilo Pereira (1991-09-09) 9 September 1991 (age 30) 61 2   Paris Saint-Germain
19 2DF Nuno Mendes (2002-06-19) 19 June 2002 (age 20) 15 0   Paris Saint-Germain
20 2DF João Cancelo (1994-05-27) 27 May 1994 (age 28) 36 7   Manchester City
2DF Raphaël Guerreiro (1993-12-22) 22 December 1993 (age 28) 56 3   Borussia Dortmund

6 3MF João Palhinha (1995-07-09) 9 July 1995 (age 26) 14 2   Sporting CP
8 3MF Bruno Fernandes (1994-09-08) 8 September 1994 (age 27) 46 8   Manchester United
10 3MF Bernardo Silva (1994-08-10) 10 August 1994 (age 27) 70 8   Manchester City
11 3MF Vitinha (2000-02-13) 13 February 2000 (age 22) 3 0   Porto
14 3MF William Carvalho (1992-04-07) 7 April 1992 (age 30) 73 5   Betis
16 3MF Otávio (1995-02-09) 9 February 1995 (age 27) 7 2   Porto
18 3MF Rúben Neves (1997-03-13) 13 March 1997 (age 25) 30 0   Wolverhampton Wanderers
23 3MF Matheus Nunes (1998-08-27) 27 August 1998 (age 23) 8 1   Sporting CP
3MF João Moutinho (3rd captain) (1986-09-08) 8 September 1986 (age 35) 146 7   Wolverhampton Wanderers

7 4FW Ricardo Horta (1994-09-15) 15 September 1994 (age 27) 4 1   Braga
9 4FW André Silva (1995-11-06) 6 November 1995 (age 26) 51 19   RB Leipzig
15 4FW Rafael Leão (1999-06-10) 10 June 1999 (age 23) 9 0   AC Milan
17 4FW Gonçalo Guedes (1996-11-29) 29 November 1996 (age 25) 32 7   Valencia
21 4FW Diogo Jota (1996-12-04) 4 December 1996 (age 25) 27 9   Liverpool
4FW Cristiano Ronaldo (captain) (1985-02-05) 5 February 1985 (age 37) 189 117   Manchester United

Recent call-ups

The following players have also been called up to the Portugal squad within the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK José Sá (1993-01-17) 17 January 1993 (age 29) 0 0   Wolverhampton Wanderers v.   Spain, 2 June 2022 INJ

DF José Fonte (1983-12-22) 22 December 1983 (age 38) 50 1   Lille v.   North Macedonia, 29 March 2022
DF Cédric Soares (1991-08-31) 31 August 1991 (age 30) 34 1   Arsenal v.   North Macedonia, 29 March 2022
DF Tiago Djaló (2000-04-09) 9 April 2000 (age 22) 0 0   Lille v.   North Macedonia, 29 March 2022
DF Gonçalo Inácio (2001-08-25) 25 August 2001 (age 20) 0 0   Sporting CP v.   North Macedonia, 29 March 2022
DF Rúben Dias (1997-05-14) 14 May 1997 (age 25) 37 2   Manchester City v.   Serbia, 14 November 2021
DF Nélson Semedo (1993-11-16) 16 November 1993 (age 28) 24 0   Wolverhampton Wanderers v.   Serbia, 14 November 2021
DF Ricardo Pereira (1993-10-06) 6 October 1993 (age 28) 7 0   Leicester City v.   Republic of Ireland, 1 September 2021 INJ

MF Renato Sanches (1997-08-18) 18 August 1997 (age 24) 32 3   Lille v.   Serbia, 14 November 2021
MF João Mário (1993-01-19) 19 January 1993 (age 29) 50 2   Benfica v.   Republic of Ireland, 11 November 2021 INJ
MF Sérgio Oliveira (1992-06-02) 2 June 1992 (age 30) 13 0   Roma UEFA Euro 2020

FW João Félix (1999-11-10) 10 November 1999 (age 22) 22 3   Atlético Madrid v.   North Macedonia, 29 March 2022
FW Rafa Silva (1993-05-17) 17 May 1993 (age 29) 25 0   Benfica v.   Republic of Ireland, 11 November 2021 INJ
FW Francisco Trincão (1999-12-29) 29 December 1999 (age 22) 7 0   Wolverhampton Wanderers v.   Qatar, 9 October 2021 COV
FW Pedro Gonçalves (1998-06-28) 28 June 1998 (age 23) 2 0   Sporting CP v.   Republic of Ireland, 1 September 2021 INJ

COV Player withdrew from the squad due to contracting COVID-19.
INJ Player withdrew from the squad due to an injury.
PRE Preliminary squad.
RET Player retired from international football.
OTH Player withdrew from the squad due to other reasons.

Individual records

Most capped players

 
Cristiano Ronaldo is Portugal's most capped player and all-time top scorer.
As of match played 12 June 2022[139]
Players in bold are still active with Portugal.
Rank Player Caps Goals First cap Latest cap
1 Cristiano Ronaldo 189 117 20 August 2003 9 June 2022
2 João Moutinho 146 7 17 August 2005 9 June 2022
3 Pepe 128 7 21 November 2007 12 June 2022
4 Luís Figo 127 32 12 October 1991 8 July 2006
5 Nani 112 24 1 September 2006 2 July 2017
6 Fernando Couto 110 8 19 December 1990 30 June 2004
7 Rui Patrício 104 0 17 November 2010 12 June 2022
8 Bruno Alves 96 11 5 June 2007 7 June 2018
9 Rui Costa 94 26 31 March 1993 4 July 2004
10 Ricardo Carvalho 89 5 11 October 2003 22 June 2016

Top goalscorers

As of match played 5 June 2022[140]
Players in bold are still active for the national team.
Rank Player Goals Caps Average First cap Latest cap
1 Cristiano Ronaldo (list) 117 189 0.62 20 August 2003 9 June 2022
2 Pauleta (list) 47 88 0.53 20 August 1997 8 July 2006
3 Eusébio (list) 41 64 0.64 8 October 1961 13 October 1973
4 Luís Figo 32 127 0.25 12 October 1991 8 July 2006
5 Nuno Gomes 29 79 0.37 24 January 1996 11 October 2011
6 Hélder Postiga 27 71 0.38 13 June 2003 14 November 2014
7 Rui Costa 26 94 0.28 31 March 1993 4 July 2004
8 Nani 24 112 0.21 1 September 2006 2 July 2017
9 João Pinto 23 81 0.30 12 October 1991 14 June 2002
10 Nené 22 66 0.33 21 April 1971 23 June 1984
Simão 22 85 0.26 18 October 1998 29 June 2010

Goal records

Most goals scored in one World Cup
9 – Eusébio (1966)[141]
Most goals scored in World Cups
9 – Eusébio (1966)[141]
Most goals scored in one European Championship
5 – Cristiano Ronaldo (2020)
Most goals scored in European Championships
14 – Cristiano Ronaldo (2004, 2008, 2012, 2016 and 2020)[142]
Oldest goalscorer
37 years, 9 months and 18 days – José Fonte (3–0 against Qatar on 9 October 2021)
Youngest goalscorer
17 years, 9 months and 25 days – Fernando Chalana (2–1 against Cyprus on 5 December 1976)
Most hat-tricks
10 – Cristiano Ronaldo (includes four goals against Andorra on 7 October 2016 and Lithuania on 10 September 2019)[143]
Most pokers
2 – Cristiano Ronaldo
Youngest player to score a hat-trick
20 years, 11 months and 4 days – André Silva (6–0 against Faroe Islands on 10 October 2016)[144]

Other records

Most matches played in World Cup
17 – Cristiano Ronaldo (2006, 2010, 2014 and 2018)[120]
Most matches played in European Championship
25 – Cristiano Ronaldo (2004, 2008, 2012, 2016 and 2020)[145]
Oldest player (outfield and goalkeeper)
39 years, 3 months and 14 days – Pepe (2–0 against Czech Republic on 9 June 2022) 
Longest national career
18 years, 9 months and 20 days  – Cristiano Ronaldo (From 20 August 2003 to 9 June 2022) 
Longest national career for an outfield player
18 years, 9 months and 20 days  – Cristiano Ronaldo (From 20 August 2003 to 9 June 2022) 
Youngest debutant
17 years, 6 months and 24 days – Paulo Futre (5–0 against Finland on 21 September 1983)[146]
Youngest player to reach 100 caps
27 years, 8 months and 11 days – Cristiano Ronaldo (1–1 against Northern Ireland on 16 October 2012)[147]

Competitive record

  Champions    Runners-up    Third place    Fourth place  

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup record Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1930 Did not enter Declined participation
  1934 Did not qualify 2nd 2 0 0 2 1 11
  1938 2nd 1 0 0 1 1 2
  1950 2nd 2 0 1 1 3 7
  1954 2nd 2 0 1 1 1 9
  1958 3rd 4 1 1 2 4 7
  1962 2nd 4 1 1 2 9 7
  1966 Third place 3rd 6 5 0 1 17 8 1st 6 4 1 1 9 4
  1970 Did not qualify 4th 6 1 2 3 8 10
  1974 2nd 6 2 3 1 10 6
  1978 2nd 6 4 1 1 12 6
  1982 4th 8 3 1 4 8 11
  1986 Group stage 17th 3 1 0 2 2 4 2nd 8 5 0 3 12 10
  1990 Did not qualify 3rd 8 4 2 2 11 8
  1994 3rd 10 6 2 2 18 5
  1998 3rd 10 5 4 1 12 4
    2002 Group stage 21st 3 1 0 2 6 4 1st 10 7 3 0 33 7
  2006 Fourth place 4th 7 4 1* 2 7 5 1st 12 9 3 0 35 5
  2010 Round of 16 11th 4 1 2 1 7 1 P/O 12 7 4 1 19 5
  2014 Group stage 18th 3 1 1 1 4 7 P/O 12 8 3 1 24 11
  2018 Round of 16 13th 4 1 2 1 6 6 1st 10 9 0 1 32 4
  2022 Qualified P/O 10 7 2 1 22 7
      2026 To be determined To be determined
Total Third place 8/22 30 14 6 10 49 35 149 83 35 31 284 146
*Draws include knockout matches decided via penalty shoot-out.

UEFA European Championship

UEFA European Championship record Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
  1960 Did not qualify 4 3 0 1 8 8
  1964 3 1 0 2 4 5
  1968 6 2 2 2 6 6
  1972 6 3 1 2 10 6
  1976 6 2 3 1 5 7
  1980 8 4 1 3 10 11
  1984 Semi-finals 3rd 4 1 2 1 4 4 6 5 0 1 11 6
  1988 Did not qualify 8 2 4 2 6 8
  1992 8 5 1 2 11 4
  1996 Quarter-finals 5th 4 2 1 1 5 2 10 7 2 1 29 7
    2000 Semi-finals 3rd 5 4 0 1 10 4 10 7 2 1 32 4
  2004 Runners-up 2nd 6 3 1* 2 8 6 Qualified as hosts
    2008 Quarter-finals 7th 4 2 0 2 7 6 14 7 6 1 24 10
    2012 Semi-finals 3rd[a] 5 3 1* 1 6 4 10 6 2 2 27 14
  2016 Champions 1st 7 3 4* 0 9 5 8 7 0 1 11 5
  2020 Round of 16 13th 4 1 1 2 7 7 8 5 2 1 22 6
  2024 To be determined To be determined
Total 1 title 8/16 39 19 10 10 56 38 115 66 26 23 216 107
*Draws include knockout matches decided via penalty shoot-out. Red border colour indicates that the tournament was held on home soil.

UEFA Nations League

UEFA Nations League record
Season** Division Group Pld W D* L GF GA P/R Rank
  2018–19 A 3 6 4 2 0 9 4   1st
  2020–21 A 3 6 4 1 1 12 4   5th
  2022–23 A To be determined
Total 12 8 3 1 21 8 1 title
*Draws include knockout matches decided via penalty shoot-out.
**Group stage played home and away. Flag shown represents host nation for the finals stage. Red border colour indicates the finals stage will be held on home soil

FIFA Confederations Cup

FIFA Confederations Cup record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA
  1992 Did not qualify
  1995
  1997
  1999
   2001
  2003
  2005
  2009
  2013
  2017 Third place 3rd 5 3 2* 0 9 3
Total Third place 1/10 5 3 2 0 9 3
*Draws include knockout matches decided via penalty shoot-out.

Olympics Games

19681988 national amateur football team. Football at the Summer Olympics has been an under-23 tournament since 1992.

Olympics Games Record
Year Round Pld W D* L GF GA
  1896 No football tournament
  1900 Did not enter
  1904
  1908
  1912
  1920
  1924
  1928 Quarter-finals 3 2 0 1 7 5
  1932 No football tournament
  1936 Did not enter
  1948
  1952
  1956
  1960
  1964
  1968
  1972
  1976
  1980
  1984 Did not qualify
  1988
  1992
  1996 Fourth place 6 2 2 2 6 10
  2000 Did not qualify
  2004 Group stage 3 1 0 2 6 9
  2008 Did not qualify
  2012
  2016 Quarter-finals 4 2 1 1 5 6
  2020 Did not qualify
Total Fourth place 16 7 3 6 24 30
*Draws include knockout matches decided via penalty shoot-out.

Minor tournaments

Year Round Position GP W D* L GF GA
  1964 Taça de Nações Third place, round-robin 3rd 3 0 1 2 2 7
  1972 Brazil Independence Cup Runners-up 2nd 8 6 1 1 17 5
  1992 U.S. Cup Round-robin 4th 3 0 1 2 0 3
  1995 SkyDome Cup Winners, round-robin 1st 2 1 1 0 2 1
Total 1 title 16 7 4 5 21 16
*Draws include knockout matches decided via penalty shoot-out.

All-time results

The following table shows Portugal's all-time international record, correct as of 29 March 2022.

Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA
Total 647 315 151 181 1096 741

Source: Portugal - Historical results

Honours

Rivalries

Footnotes

  1. ^ Though there was no third place play-off, UEFA decided in the 2012 edition to award the semi-final losers (Germany and Portugal) bronze medals for the first time.[148]

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