Morocco national football team

The Morocco national football team (Arabic: منتخب المغرب لكرة القدم‎, Berber: ⵜⴰⵔⴰⴱⴱⵓⵓⵜ ⴰⵏⴰⵎⵓⵔ ⵏ ⵍⵎⵖⵔⵉⴱ), nicknamed The Atlas Lions, represents Morocco in men's international football competitions. It is controlled by the Royal Moroccan Football Federation, also known as FRMF. The team's colours are red and green. The team is a member of both FIFA and the Confederation of African Football (CAF).

Morocco
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)The Atlas Lions
AssociationRoyal Moroccan Football Federation (FRMF)
ConfederationCAF (Africa)
Sub-confederationUNAF (North Africa)
Head coachVahid Halilhodžić
CaptainRomain Saïss
Most capsNoureddine Naybet (115)[1]
Top scorerAhmed Faras (36)[1]
Home stadiumVarious
FIFA codeMAR
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 33 Decrease 1 (16 September 2021)[2]
Highest10 (April 1998 [3])
Lowest95 (September 2010)
First international
 Morocco 3–3 Iraq 
(Beirut, Lebanon; 19 October 1957)
Biggest win
 Morocco 13–1 Saudi Arabia 
(Casablanca, Morocco; 6 September 1961)
Biggest defeat
 Brazil 3–0 Morocco 
(Nantes, France; 16 June 1998)
World Cup
Appearances5 (first in 1970)
Best resultRound of 16 (1986)
Africa Cup of Nations
Appearances18 (first in 1972)
Best resultChampions (1976)
African Nations Championship
Appearances4 (first in 2014)
Best resultChampions (2018 and 2020)

The Atlas Lions were considered the best African national football team when they ranked 10th in the FIFA World Rankings in April 1998, as the first African national team to be ranked by FIFA in the top ten. They are also the only African national team to have been at the top of the FIFA World Rankings[clarification needed] for three consecutive years, from 1997 to 1999. Internationally, Morocco won the African Nations Cup in 1976 and have participated in the FIFA World Cup five times. Their best result came in 1986, when they were the first and the only African national team to finish top of a group at the World Cup. In that 1986 FIFA World Cup Group F, Morocco finished ahead of England, Portugal and Poland after holding both Poland and England to goalless draws, and beating Portugal 3–1. Thus they became the first African and first Arab national team, and only the second from outside Europe and the Americas (after North Korea in 1966), to reach the second round at the World Cup. In the subsequent round of 16 knockout, they narrowly lost to eventual runners-up West Germany 1–0.

HistoryEdit

Pre-independence periodEdit

The Moroccan national team was founded in 1928 and played its first game on 22 December of that year against the B team of France, to whom it lost 2–1. This team, formed by the best footballers of the LMFA or the Moroccan Football League (settlers or natives), was active in friendly matches against other North African teams such as those of Algeria and Tunisia. These associations of settler clubs and local footballers, in addition to having their own championship, clashed with each other in a tournament that Morocco won several times, such as in 1948–1949.

The LMFA also faced some club teams such as NK Lokomotiva Zagreb in January 1950, as well as France A and France B. Against France A the LMFA made a 1–1 draw in Casablanca in 1941.

On 9 September 1954, an earthquake struck the Algerian region of Orléansville (now Chlef) and caused the destruction of the city and the death of over 1,400 people. On 7 October 1954, the French Football Association and the Maghreb inhabitants organized a charity match to raise funds for the families of the victims of the catastrophic event. In the match, held at the Parc de Princes in Paris, a team made up of Moroccans, Algerians and Tunisians played against the national team of France. Led by star Larbi Benbarek, the Maghreb selection managed to win 3–2, a month before the Toussaint Rouge attacks by the Algerian National Liberation Front which marked the beginning of the Algerian War.

The beginnings of Morocco (1955–1963)Edit

In 1955, the Royal Moroccan Football Federation was established, at the end of the French protectorate of Morocco, which had lasted since 1912.

On 19 October 1957, at the 2nd edition of the Pan Arab Games in Lebanon, Morocco made its debut as an independent country against Iraq, at the Camille Chamoun Sports City Stadium, and drew 3–3. At the tournament, Morocco took the first win in its history against Libya, winning 5–1, then beat Tunisia 3–1 to reach the semi-finals. After a 1–1 draw with Syria, lots were drawn to decide who would progress to the final, and Syria were selected at Morocco's expense. Morocco withdrew from the third-place play-off against Lebanon and finished fourth overall.

Between 1957 and 1958, Morocco held numerous friendly matches against the National Liberation Front team, the representative of Algeria before its independence in 1958. In 1959, the team took part for the first time in an international competition, the qualifying rounds of the 1960 Rome Olympics. Drawn into a group with Tunisia and Malta, Morocco finished second on goal difference and failed to progress. That same year, the football federation of Morocco joined FIFA.

In 1960, Morocco competed in World Cup qualification for the first time. Drawn against Tunisia in the first round, Morocco won the first leg 2–1, while Tunisia won the second leg 2–1. A play-off held in Palermo, Italy also finished in a tie, so a coin toss was used to determine who progressed. Morocco won the toss, and beat Ghana 1–0 on aggregate to reach the inter-continental play-offs. Drawn against Spain, Morocco lost 4–2 on aggregate and thus failed to qualify.

In 1961, Morocco held the Pan-Arab Games and won the football tournament, winning all five of their matches. Their third match, against Saudi Arabia, resulted in Morocco's biggest-ever victory, winning 13–1. They also claimed their first two wins against a European team, beating East Germany 2–1 and 2–0.

In 1963, the Moroccan team came close to qualifying for the African Cup of Nations. In the decisive play-off against Tunisia, they were defeated 4–1 in Tunis and won 4–2 at home, they were therefore eliminated. At the Mediterranean Games in Naples 1963, they finished fourth after a 2–1 defeat in the final for third place against Spain's reserve team.

First appearances in international competitions (1963–1976)Edit

Morocco participated for the first time in the final phase of an international competition at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. Having qualified under the leadership of manager Mohamed Massoun [fr], the Moroccans were included in a group of three teams due to the renunciation of North Korea. Morocco lost both their matches, against Hungary (6–0, the team's worst-ever defeat) and Yugoslavia (3–1, despite taking the lead in the second minute via Ali Bouachra).

In 1966, the Moroccan Football Association joined the Confederation of African Football and was able to participate in the competitions organized by the CAF.

At the 1967 Mediterranean Games in Tunis, the Moroccans were eliminated in the first round, finishing fourth in a group containing Italy, France, and Algeria.

During qualifying for the 1968 Olympics, Morocco refused to play against Israel, and were eventually replaced by Ghana.

In the two-year period 1968–1969, the team was engaged in qualifying for the Mexican World Championship in 1970. Their debut was positive, they eliminated Senegal (1–0) and Tunisia after a draw, which at the time was necessary after three draws (of which last in Marseille, by 2–2). In the final round of the preliminaries, against Sudan and Nigeria, Morocco obtained five points, finishing ahead of Nigeria and qualifying for the first time for the final round of a world championship. Shortly after, Morocco lost the decisive play-off against Algeria to enter the final stage of the 1970 Africa Cup of Nations.

Morocco thus became the first African national team to qualify for a world championship after having played in an elimination tournament (at 1934 FIFA World Cup in Italy, Egypt was the first African national team to take part in the World Cup, but without having played the qualifications before). The Moroccan team, coached by the Yugoslav Blagoje Vidinić, consisted exclusively of players in the Moroccan league, including Driss Bamous and Ahmed Faras.

On 3 June 1970, against West Germany in front of 12,942 spectators, Morocco surprisingly opened the scoring with a goal in the twenty-first game of Houmane Jarir. In the second half, however, the West Germans scored with Uwe Seeler and Gerd Müller and won by 2–1. The Lions of the Atlas then played against Peru in front of 13,537 spectators. This time the Moroccans conceded three goals in ten minutes to lose 3–0. On 11 June 1970, the eliminated Moroccans drew with Bulgaria 1–1, with a comeback goal in the sixtieth game of Maouhoub Ghazouani. It was the first point obtained by an African national team at the World Cup.

In the 1972 Africa Cup of Nations qualification, the Lions of the Atlas ousted Algeria, then they faced Egypt, beating them 3–0 in the first leg and suffering a 3–2 defeat on the way back, yet they qualified for the first time for the final phase of the continental tournament. In the group stage, they had three 1–1 draws against Congo, Sudan and Zaire and were eliminated in the first round. All three Moroccan goals brought the signature of Ahmed Faras.

Qualifying for the 1972 Olympics with two wins and two draws, Morocco debuted in Group A with a white-neat draw 0–0 with the United States, then lost 3–0 against West Germany and defeated Malaysia 6–0 with an Ahmed Faras hat-trick, qualifying for the second round. Due to defeats against USSR (3–0), Denmark (3–1) and Poland (5–0), they were then eliminated.

In the 1974 world championship qualifiers, Morocco passed three CAF qualifying rounds, entering the final round with Zambia and Zaire. Badly beaten 4–0 at home by Zaire, who then won two consecutive matches against Zambia, the Moroccans went to Zaire for the return match and lost there 3–0, conceding three goals in the second half, after Faras leaving the field due to injury. Morocco filed an appeal, trying to get the match to play again, and did not appear at the final challenge against Zambia. Protesting against FIFA in protest, he also decided not to take part in the 1974 Africa Cup of Nations.

In 1974, Morocco played only two games, both against Algeria, achieving a 2–0 win and a 0–0 draw. After 1974, Morocco resumed its regular FIFA and CAF competitions. They managed to get the qualification for the 1976 Africa Cup of Nations by eliminating Ghana at the last round, but failed to qualify for the 1976 Olympics, as eliminated by Nigeria.

Between successes and defeats (1976–1986)Edit

Morocco, coached by the Romanian Virgil Mărdărescu and captained by Ahmed Faras, took the continental throne, finishing in first place the final round of the 1976 African Cup of Nations, in his second participation in the final phase of the competition.

The final phase, in Ethiopia, foresaw a novelty, the first two classified of each of the two groups of four teams would have met in a final round from four teams, contending the title of Champion of Africa. The elimination rounds were cancelled, and replaced by a mini-championship. On 29 February 1976, the tournament started with the first matches of group A, but Morocco, entered in group B, started on 1 March 1976. Inserted in a group with Sudan, Zaire and Nigeria, Mărdărescu's team equalized 2–2 with Sudan (Mustapha Fetoui [fr]'s Moroccan goals on the 5th and Ahmed Abouali on the 58th minute), then, thanks to Abdel Ali Zahraoui's goal on the eightieth minute of play, they beat Zaire. In the last game they won a comeback 3–1 against Nigeria (Nigerian goal on the 5th with a penalty and Moroccan trio with Ahmed Faras on the 8th, Abdallah Tazi on 19th and Larbi Chebbak on the 81st), obtaining so the first place in the group and qualifying for the final round (a group stage of four teams) together with the Nigerians, second in the standings in the group B. The final round put Morocco against Egypt. The Moroccans, had an advantage with a goal by Faras, suffered a draw, but took the lead two minutes before the end of the match again with Zahraoui and won 2–1. The next match against the Nigerians ended with a success, thanks to two goals from Ahmed Faras and Redouane Guezzar [fr] scored in the last eight minutes of play to overturn the provisional opponent advantage (2–1). The final match, against Guinea, would have decided the African Champion team. On 14 March 1976, in Addis Ababa, the Guineans, aimed to victory, took the lead in the first half, but four minutes to the end of the match Ahmed Makrouh [fr] scored the goal of the final draw (1–1), which gave to Morocco the first cup of its history.

Morocco then failed to qualify for the 1974 FIFA World Cup, the 1978 FIFA World Cup and the 1982 FIFA World Cup. At the 1978 Africa Cup of Nations, they were eliminated in the first round, while at the 1980 Africa Cup of Nations they won the third place, beating in the consolation final Egypt 2–0. They then won the 1983 Mediterranean Games, played at home, thanks to a 3–0 success in the final against Turkey B.

Morocco did not qualify for either the 1982 Africa Cup of Nations or that of 1984 Africa Cup of Nations. At the 1986 Africa Cup of Nations, they finished fourth, beaten 3–2 in the consolation final by the Ivory Coast (Moroccan goals by Abdelfettah Rhiati and Mohammed Sahil).

Golden Generation (1986–2000)Edit

The subsequent participation in the 1986 FIFA World Cup which took place in Mexico. Morocco, coached by the Brazilian José Faria, had a valid team at their disposal, with Aziz Bouderbala, Salahdine Hmied, Merry Krimau and Mohamed Timoumi.

In Mexico, Morocco surprisingly won a group with Portugal, England and Poland, thanks to two draws against the English and Polish teams and a 3–1 win against the Portuguese (Abderrazak Khairi scored twice and goals from Abdelkrim Merry Krimau). However, they were narrowly eliminated by West Germany in the first knockout round, thanks to a goal from Lothar Matthäus one minute from the end of regulation time. Morocco became the first African and Arab national team to have passed the first round of a world championship.

Two years later, the Moroccan team presented itself at the 1988 African Cup of Nations as a host country with high expectations. After winning the first round, they were eliminated in the semifinals by Cameroon and finished in fourth place after losing the consolation final against Algeria (1–1 after extra time and 4–3 after the penalty shots).

Failure to qualify for the 1990 FIFA World Cup opened a period of crisis. In the 1992 African Cup of Nations, the team was eliminated in the first round. They did not participate, then, either in the 1994 Africa Cup or in the 1996 African Cup.

At the end of the millennium, the North African team took part in two consecutive world championships: in the United States in 1994 and in France in 1998. On both occasions they were eliminated in the first round, although in the second case it came close to qualifying.

In 1994, Morocco were knocked out after three defeats against Belgium (1–0), Saudi Arabia (2–1, Moroccan goal of Mohammed Chaouch) and Netherlands (2–1, Moroccan goal of Hassan Nader), while in 1998 they left in a controversial way. Having drawn in the first match with Norway 2–2 (goals from star Mustapha Hadji and Abdeljalil Hadda) and lost 3–0 against Brazil, Morocco coached by the French Henri Michel clearly beat (3–0) the Scotland (goal by Abdeljalil Hadda and two goals by Salaheddine Bassir) in Saint-Étienne, but by the time the qualifying seemed to have been achieved, they were overtaken in the standings by Norway, who was incredibly strong on Brazil (2–1) scoring the decisive goal in the last minutes of the game, thanks to a much discussed penalty.

At the 1998 Africa Cup of Nations, after winning their group, Morocco were defeated and eliminated from South Africa (2–1). They failed to qualify for the 2002 FIFA World Cup.

Difficult years (2006–2016)Edit

In 2012, the national team won the 2012 Arab Cup, a tournament reserved for Arab national teams with a team made up only of players playing in the Moroccan championship.

Ascent (2016–Present)Edit

The national team won the championship of African nations in 2018, a tournament reserved for African national teams with a team formed only by players playing in the Moroccan championship. Back to participate in the final phase of a World Cup after 20 years, in 2018 FIFA World Cup, Morocco went out in the first round, after two 0–1 defeats against Iran and Portugal. In the last match against Spain they took the lead 2–1 but was unable to keep it, and drew 2–2, ultimately managed to eliminate Iran as well. Morocco entered the 2019 AFCON with high confidence, having played the previous World Cup. However, in spite of three straight group stage wins, Morocco was shockingly knocked out by less known Benin in the round of sixteen.

Home stadiumEdit

Morocco traditionally play their home games at Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium in Rabat and the Stade Mohamed V in Casablanca as the main stadiums during their World Cup qualifiers, but they have recently used the new stadiums Stade de Marrakech in Marrakech, also the Stade Adrar in Agadir, Stade Ibn Batouta in Tangier and Fez Stadium in Fez.

Results and fixturesEdit

The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

2021Edit

26 March 2021 AFCON Q Mauritania   0–0   Morocco Nouakchott, Mauritania
20:00 Report Stadium: Stade Cheikha Ould Boïdiya
Referee: Joshua Bondo (Botswana)
30 March 2021 AFCON Q Morocco   1–0   Burundi Rabat, Morocco
20:00
Report Stadium: Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium
Referee: Blaise Yuven Ngwa (Cameroon)
8 June Friendly Morocco   1–0   Ghana Rabat, Morocco
20:00 (UTC+1)
Report Stadium: Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium
Referee: Adalbert Diouf (Senegal)
12 June Friendly Morocco   1–0   Burkina Faso Rabat, Morocco
20:00 (UTC+1)
Report Stadium: Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium
Referee: Abdel Aziz Mohamed Bouh (Mauritania)
2 September 2021 2022 FWC Q Morocco   2–0   Sudan Rabat, Morocco
20:00 (UTC+1)
Report Stadium: Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium
Attendance: 0
Referee: Maguette N'Diaye (Senegal)
6 October 2021 2022 FWC Q Morocco   5–0   Guinea-Bissau Rabat, Morocco
21:00 (UTC+1)
Report Stadium: Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium
Referee: Boubou Traoré (Mali)
9 October 2021 2022 FWC Q Guinea-Bissau   0–3   Morocco Casablanca, (Morocco)
20:00 (UTC+1) Report
Stadium: Stade Mohamed V
Referee: Jean Jacques Ndala Ngambo (Democratic Republic of the Congo)
12 October 2021 2022 FWC Q Guinea   1–4   Morocco Agadir, Morocco
20:00 (UTC+1)
Report
Stadium: Stade Adrar
Referee: Sidi Alioum (Cameroon)
Note: The match was originally scheduled on 6 September 2021, 16:00 UTC+0, but was postponed due to security concerns following the 2021 Guinean coup d'état.
11–13 November 2021 2022 FWC Q Sudan   v   Morocco Sudan
14–16 November 2021 2022 FWC Q Morocco   v   Guinea Morocco
1 December 2021 2021 FAC Morocco   v   Palestine Al Wakrah, Qatar
19:00 Stadium: Al Janoub Stadium
4 December 2021 2021 FAC Jordan   v   Morocco Al Rayyan, Qatar
13:00 Stadium: Ahmed bin Ali Stadium
7 December 2021 2021 FAC Morocco   v   Saudi Arabia Doha, Qatar
18:00 Stadium: Al Thumama Stadium

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

The following players were called up for the 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification matches against   Guinea-Bissau (twice) and   Guinea on 6, 9 and 12 October 2021.[5]
Caps and goals are correct as of 12 October 2021, after the match against Guinea.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Yassine Bounou (1991-04-05) 5 April 1991 (age 30) 35 0   Sevilla
12 1GK Munir Mohamedi (1989-05-10) 10 May 1989 (age 32) 41 0   Hatayspor
22 1GK Anas Zniti (1988-10-28) 28 October 1988 (age 32) 3 0   Raja Casablanca
1GK Sami Tlemcani (2004-02-21) 21 February 2004 (age 17) 0 0   Chelsea

2 2DF Achraf Hakimi (1998-11-04) 4 November 1998 (age 22) 40 5   Paris Saint-Germain
3 2DF Adam Masina (1994-01-02) 2 January 1994 (age 27) 5 0   Watford
4 2DF Samy Mmaee (1996-09-08) 8 September 1996 (age 25) 5 0   Ferencváros
5 2DF Nayef Aguerd (1996-03-30) 30 March 1996 (age 25) 10 1   Rennes
6 2DF Romain Saïss (captain) (1990-03-26) 26 March 1990 (age 31) 53 1   Wolverhampton Wanderers
18 2DF Sofian Chakla (1993-09-02) 2 September 1993 (age 28) 3 0   OH Leuven
21 2DF Souffian El Karouani (2000-10-19) 19 October 2000 (age 20) 2 0   NEC
24 2DF Ayoub El Amloud (1994-04-08) 8 April 1994 (age 27) 1 0   Wydad Casablanca

7 3MF Imran Louza (1999-05-01) 1 May 1999 (age 22) 3 1   Watford
11 3MF Fayçal Fajr (1988-08-01) 1 August 1988 (age 33) 43 3   Sivasspor
13 3MF Ilias Chair (1997-10-30) 30 October 1997 (age 23) 5 1   Queens Park Rangers
15 3MF Selim Amallah (1996-11-15) 15 November 1996 (age 24) 12 3   Standard Liège
16 3MF Aymen Barkok (1998-05-21) 21 May 1998 (age 23) 12 1   Eintracht Frankfurt
20 3MF Sofyan Amrabat (1996-08-21) 21 August 1996 (age 25) 25 0   Fiorentina
3MF Abdou Harroui (1998-01-13) 13 January 1998 (age 23) 0 0   Sassuolo

8 4FW Ayoub El Kaabi (1993-06-25) 25 June 1993 (age 28) 13 6   Hatayspor
9 4FW Sofiane Boufal (1993-09-17) 17 September 1993 (age 28) 20 1   Angers
10 4FW Munir El Haddadi (1995-09-01) 1 September 1995 (age 26) 7 2   Sevilla
14 4FW Zakaria Aboukhlal (2000-02-18) 18 February 2000 (age 21) 5 1   AZ
17 4FW Achraf Bencharki (1994-09-24) 24 September 1994 (age 27) 9 0   Zamalek
19 4FW Youssef En-Nesyri (1997-06-01) 1 June 1997 (age 24) 40 11   Sevilla
21 4FW Soufiane Rahimi (1996-03-23) 23 March 1996 (age 25) 2 0   Al-Ain
23 4FW Ryan Mmaee (1997-11-01) 1 November 1997 (age 23) 5 0   Ferencvárosi

Recent call-upsEdit

The following players have been called up for the team in the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Ahmed Reda Tagnaouti (1996-04-05) 5 April 1996 (age 25) 3 0   Wydad Casablanca v.   Burkina Faso, 12 June 2021

DF Jawad El Yamiq (1992-02-29) 29 February 1992 (age 29) 9 2   Valladolid v.   Guinea, 7 September 2021
DF Sofiane Alakouch (1998-07-29) 29 July 1998 (age 23) 0 0   Metz v.   Guinea, 7 September 2021
DF Achraf Lazaar (1992-01-22) 22 January 1992 (age 29) 12 0   Portimonense v.   Burkina Faso, 12 June 2021
DF Zouhair Feddal (1989-12-23) 23 December 1989 (age 31) 21 1   Sporting CP v.   Burundi, 30 March 2021
DF Issam Chebake (1989-10-12) 12 October 1989 (age 32) 7 0   APOEL v.   Burundi, 30 March 2021
DF Nabil Dirar (1986-02-25) 25 February 1986 (age 35) 42 3   Fenerbahçe v.   Mauritania, 26 March 2021 WD
DF Hamza Mendyl (1997-10-21) 21 October 1997 (age 23) 20 0   Gaziantep v.   Central African Republic, 17 November 2020
DF Noussair Mazraoui (1997-11-14) 14 November 1997 (age 23) 12 2   Ajax v.   Central African Republic, 17 November 2020

MF Adel Taarabt (1989-05-24) 24 May 1989 (age 32) 29 4   Benfica v.   Guinea, 7 September 2021
MF Youssef Maleh (1998-08-28) 28 August 1998 (age 23) 0 0   Fiorentina v.   Guinea, 7 September 2021
MF Yahya Jabrane (1991-06-18) 18 June 1991 (age 30) 3 0   Wydad Casablanca v.   Burkina Faso, 12 June 2021
MF Oussama Tannane (1994-03-23) 23 March 1994 (age 27) 11 2   Vitesse v.   Burundi, 30 March 2021
MF Amine Harit (1997-06-18) 18 June 1997 (age 24) 11 0   Marseille v.   Central African Republic, 17 November 2020
MF Zakaria Labyad (1993-03-09) 9 March 1993 (age 28) 6 0   Ajax v.   Central African Republic, 17 November 2020
MF Nassim Boujellab (1999-06-20) 20 June 1999 (age 22) 3 0   Ingolstadt 04 v.   Central African Republic, 17 November 2020

FW Hakim Ziyech (1993-03-19) 19 March 1993 (age 28) 41 17   Chelsea v.   Burkina Faso, 12 June 2021
FW Youssef El-Arabi (1987-02-03) 3 February 1987 (age 34) 47 16   Olympiacos v.   Burundi, 30 March 2021

DEC Player declined the call-up to the squad
INJ Did not make it to the current squad due to injury
PRE Preliminary squad / standby
RET Player retired from internationals
SUS Player is suspended
WD Player withdrew from the roster for non-injury related reasons

Previous squadsEdit

Player recordsEdit

As of 30 March 2021[6]
Players in bold are still active with Morocco.

Coaching staffEdit

Position Name
Head coach   Vahid Halilhodžić[7]
Assistant coach   Mustapha Hadji
  Stéphane Gilli
Goalkeeping coach   Mustapha Chadili
  Laurent Weber
Fitness coach   Salaheddine Lahlou
  Christophe Manouvrier
Video Analyst   Moussa El Habchi
Technical director   Badou Ezzaki

CoachesEdit

Source:[8]

Managers
Name Nationality Years as manager Trophy won World Cup Africa Cup
Larbi Ben Barek   1957 - - -
Mohammed Khamirib & Abdelkader Lokhmiri   1959 - - -
Larbi Ben Barek   1960 - - -
Kader Firoud   1961 - - -
Mohammed Massoun & Abderrahmane Mahjoub   1961–1967 - - -
Guy Cluzeau & Abdellah Settati   &   1968–1969 - - -
Blagoja Vidinić   1970 - 1970 (GS) -
José Barinaga   1971–1972 - - 1972 (GS)
Abderrahmane Mahjoub   1972–1973 - - -
Virgil Mărdărescu   1974–1978 1976 African Cup of Nations - 1976 (W) - 1978 (GS)
Guy Cluzeau   1979 - - -
Just Fontaine     1979–1980 - - -
Jebrane & Yabram Hamidouch   1980–1981 - - 1980 (3RD)
Abdellah El-Ammari   1982 - - -
Jaime Valente   1983 - - -
Mehdi Faria   1983–1988 - 1986 (R16) 1986 (4TH) - 1988 (4TH)
Jaime Valente   1988–1989 - - -
Antonio Valentín   1989–1990 - - -
Abdellah Ajri Blinda   1990 - - -
Werner Olk   1990–1992 - - 1992 (GS)
Abdellah Ajri Blinda   1993–1994 - 1994 (GN) -
Mohammed Lamari   1994 - - -
Gílson Nunes   1995 - - -
Henri Michel   1995–2000 - 1998 (GS) 1998 (QF) - 2000 (GS)
Henryk Kasperczak   2000 - - -
Humberto Coelho   2000–2002 - - 2002 (GS)
Badou Ezzaki   2002–2005 - - 2004 (F)
Philippe Troussier   2005 - - -
Mohamed Fakhir   2006–2007 - - 2006 (GS)
Henri Michel   2007–2008 - - 2008 (GS)
Fathi Jamal   2008 - - -
Roger Lemerre   2008–2009 - - -
Hassan Moumen (caretaker)   2009–2010 - - -
Eric Gerets   2010–2012 - - 2012 (GS)
Rachid Taoussi   2012–2013 - - 2013 (GS)
Hassan Benabicha (caretaker)   2013–2014 - - -
Badou Ezzaki[9]   2014–2015 - - -
Hervé Renard[10]   2016–2019 - 2018 (GS) 2017 (QF) - 2019 (R16)
Vahid Halilhodžić[7]   2019–Present - - -

Kit suppliersEdit

Kit provider Period
  Adidas 1982–1993
  Lotto 1994–1995
  Umbro 1995
  Lotto 1995–1997
  Puma 1998–2002
  Nike 2003–2006
  Puma 2007–2011
  Adidas 2012–2019
  Puma 2019–
 
Morocco national team in 2012

Head-to-head performanceEdit

Correct as 30 March 2021.

Team Confederation GP W D L GF GA GD Win% Loss%
  Albania UEFA 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0% 0%
  Algeria CAF 36 17 12 7 48 26 +22 47.22% 19.44%
  Angola CAF 7 4 2 1 11 7 +4 57.14% 14.29%
  Argentina CONMEBOL 3 0 0 3 1 5 –4 0% 100%
  Armenia UEFA 1 1 0 0 6 0 +6 100% 0%
  Australia AFC 1 0 0 1 0 1 –1 0% 100%
  Austria UEFA 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 100% 0%
  Bahrain AFC 2 2 0 0 5 0 +5 100% 0%
  Belgium UEFA 3 1 0 2 4 6 –2 33.33% 66.67%
  Benin CAF 6 5 1 0 20 3 +17 83.33% 0%
  Botswana CAF 2 2 0 0 2 0 +2 100% 0%
  Brazil CONMEBOL 2 0 0 2 0 5 –5 0% 100%
  Bulgaria UEFA 6 2 3 1 10 5 +5 33.33% 16.67%
  Burkina Faso CAF 11 7 2 2 16 6 +10 63.64% 18.18%
  Burundi CAF 2 2 0 0 4 0 +4 100% 0%
  Cameroon CAF 13 2 5 6 10 12 –2 15.38% 46.15%
  Canada CONCACAF 4 2 1 1 9 7 +2 50% 25%
  Cape Verde CAF 3 2 1 0 4 1 +3 66.67% 0%
  Central African Republic CAF 5 3 2 0 10 1 +9 60% 0%
  Chile CONMEBOL 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0% 0%
  China PR AFC 1 0 1 0 3 3 0 0% 0%
  Colombia CONMEBOL 1 0 0 1 0 2 –2 0% 100%
  Comoros CAF 2 1 1 0 3 2 +1 50% 0%
  Congo CAF 5 3 2 0 6 2 +4 60% 0%
  Croatia UEFA 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 0% 0%
  Czech Republic UEFA 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0% 0%
  Denmark UEFA 1 1 0 0 4 2 +2 100% 0%
  DR Congo CAF 3 1 1 1 4 2 +2 33.33% 33.33%
  Egypt CAF 29 14 12 3 34 16 18 48.28% 10.34%
  England UEFA 2 0 1 1 0 1 –1 0% 50%
  Equatorial Guinea CAF 5 4 0 1 10 2 +2 80% 20%
  Estonia UEFA 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 100% 0%
  Ethiopia CAF 5 5 0 0 14 0 +14 100% 0%
  Finland UEFA 2 0 1 1 0 1 –1 0% 50%
  France UEFA 8 0 3 5 7 15 –8 0% 62.5%
  Gabon CAF 18 9 3 6 36 18 +18 50% 33.33%
  Gambia CAF 8 6 1 1 14 2 +12 75% 12.5%
  Germany* UEFA 4 0 0 4 3 12 –9 0% 100%
  Ghana CAF 10 4 3 3 7 8 –1 40% 30%
  Greece UEFA 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0% 0%
  Guinea CAF 14 6 6 2 19 12 +7 42.86% 14.29%
  Hong Kong AFC 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0% 0%
  Hungary UEFA 3 0 0 3 3 7 –4 0% 100%
  India AFC 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 100% 0%
  Indonesia AFC 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 100% 0%
  Iran AFC 1 0 0 1 0 1 –1 0% 100%
  Iraq AFC 10 3 4 3 6 10 –4 30% 30%
  Italy UEFA 1 0 0 1 0 1 –1 0% 100%
  Ivory Coast CAF 21 7 7 7 27 25 +2 33.33% 33.33%
  Jamaica CONCACAF 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 100% 0%
  Jordan AFC 3 3 0 0 8 2 +6 100% 0%
  Kenya CAF 5 3 2 0 10 2 +8 60% 0%
  Kuwait AFC 6 3 2 1 14 9 +5 50% 16.67%
  Lebanon AFC 3 2 0 1 5 2 +3 66.67% 33.33%
  Liberia CAF 3 2 0 1 9 3 +6 66.67% 33.33%
  Libya CAF 20 10 6 4 34 18 +16 50% 20%
  Luxembourg UEFA 3 3 0 0 6 1 +5 100% 0%
  Malawi CAF 10 6 3 1 15 3 +12 60% 10%
  Malaysia AFC 3 1 1 1 4 5 –1 33.33% 33.33%
  Mali CAF 20 9 6 5 33 12 +21 45% 25%
  Malta UEFA 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 100% 0%
  Mauritania CAF 10 7 3 0 27 5 +22 70% 0%
  Mexico CONCACAF 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 100% 0%
  Mozambique CAF 4 3 0 1 11 2 +9 75% 25%
  Myanmar AFC 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 0% 0%
  Namibia CAF 7 6 1 0 15 2 +13 85.71% 0%
  Netherlands UEFA 3 1 0 2 4 5 –1 33.33% 66.67%
  New Zealand OFC 2 2 0 0 6 0 +6 100% 0%
  Niger CAF 7 6 0 1 16 2 +14 85.71% 14.29%
  Nigeria CAF 11 6 2 3 14 8 +6 54.55% 27.27%
  Northern Ireland UEFA 2 0 1 1 2 3 –1 0% 50%
  Norway UEFA 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 0% 0%
  Oman AFC 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0% 0%
  Palestine AFC 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 100% 0%
  Peru CONMEBOL 1 0 0 1 0 3 –3 0% 100%
  Poland UEFA 5 1 2 2 3 9 –6 20% 40%
  Portugal UEFA 2 1 0 1 3 2 +1 50% 50%
  Qatar AFC 2 1 1 0 1 0 +1 50% 0%
  Republic of Ireland UEFA 1 0 0 1 0 1 –1 0% 100%
  Romania UEFA 2 1 0 1 3 5 –2 50% 50%
  Russia** UEFA 4 0 1 3 3 7 –4 0% 75%
  Rwanda CAF 4 2 1 1 7 4 +3 50% 25%
  São Tomé and Príncipe CAF 2 2 0 0 5 0 +5 100% 0%
  Saudi Arabia AFC 6 1 2 3 15 7 +8 16.67% 50%
  Scotland UEFA 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 100% 0%
  Senegal CAF 30 17 6 7 41 18 +23 56.67% 23.33%
  Serbia*** UEFA 6 1 1 4 5 12 –7 16.67% 66.67%
  Sierra Leone CAF 7 6 1 0 14 0 +14 85.71% 0%
  Singapore AFC 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 100% 0%
  Slovakia UEFA 2 2 0 0 4 2 0 100% 0%
  Somalia CAF 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 100% 0%
  South Africa CAF 7 1 3 3 6 9 –3 14.29% 42.86%
  South Korea AFC 6 1 4 1 10 9 +1 16.67% 16.67%
  Spain UEFA 4 0 1 3 5 8 –3 0% 75%
  Sudan CAF 7 3 4 0 9 3 0 42.86% 0%
   Switzerland UEFA 4 3 0 1 7 10 –3 75% 25%
  Syria AFC 3 3 0 0 6 0 +6 100% 0%
  Tanzania CAF 4 3 0 1 7 5 +2 75% 25%
  Thailand AFC 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 100% 0%
  Togo CAF 12 6 3 3 22 11 +11 50% 25%
  Trinidad and Tobago CONCACAF 3 3 0 0 4 0 +4 100% 0%
  Tunisia CAF 50 13 28 9 53 46 +7 26% 18%
  Uganda CAF 3 1 0 2 5 6 –1 33.33% 66.67%
  Ukraine UEFA 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0% 0%
  United Arab Emirates AFC 4 0 3 1 3 4 –1 0% 25%
  Uruguay CONMEBOL 2 0 0 2 0 2 –2 0% 100%
  United States CONCACAF 3 3 0 0 6 2 +2 100% 0%
  Uzbekistan AFC 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 100% 0%
  Yemen AFC 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4 100% 0%
  Zambia CAF 18 10 2 6 23 18 +5 55.56% 33.33%
  Zimbabwe CAF 4 3 1 0 6 2 +4 75% 0%

(*) includes   West Germany
(**) includes   Soviet Union
(***) includes   Yugoslavia

Competitive recordEdit

FIFA World CupEdit

Morocco's national football team has participated five times in the FIFA World Cup. Their best performance was the 1986 edition when they advanced to the second round, being the first African nation to do so. In 1998, the team narrowly missed repeating the same achievement.

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
  1930 Part of   France Part of   France
  1934
  1938
  1950
  1954
  1958 Did not enter Did not enter
  1962 Did not qualify 7 2 2 3 7 8
  1966 Withdrew Withdrew
  1970 Group stage 14th 3 0 1 2 2 6 10 4 4 2 11 7
  1974 Did not qualify 10 4 3 3 12 13
  1978 2 0 2 0 2 2
  1982 8 3 2 3 5 6
  1986 Round of 16 11th 4 1 2 1 3 2 8 5 2 1 12 1
  1990 Did not qualify 6 1 3 2 4 5
  1994 Group stage 23rd 3 0 0 3 2 5 10 7 2 1 19 4
  1998 18th 3 1 1 1 5 5 6 5 1 0 14 2
    2002 Did not qualify 10 6 3 1 11 3
  2006 10 5 5 0 17 7
  2010 10 3 3 4 14 13
  2014 6 2 3 1 9 8
  2018 Group stage 27th 3 0 1 2 2 4 8 4 3 1 13 1
  2022 To be determined
      2026
Total Round of 16 5/21 16 2 5 9 14 22 116 53 41 22 159 80

Africa Cup of NationsEdit

Africa Cup of Nations record Africa Cup of Nations qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
  1957 Not affiliated to CAF Not affiliated to CAF
  1959
  1962 Withdrew Withdrew
  1963 Did not qualify 2 1 0 1 5 6
  1965 Did not enter Did not enter
  1968
  1970 Did not qualify 2 1 0 1 1 2
  1972 Group stage 5th 3 0 3 0 3 3 4 2 0 2 9 6
  1974 Did not enter Did not enter
  1976 Champions 1st 6 4 2 0 11 6 6 4 0 2 13 4
  1978 Group stage 6th 3 1 1 1 2 4 Qualified as defending champions
  1980 Third Place 3rd 5 2 1 2 4 3 4 2 1 1 14 5
  1982 Did not qualify 4 3 0 1 8 4
  1984 4 1 2 1 4 2
  1986 Fourth Place 4th 5 1 2 2 4 5 2 1 1 0 1 0
  1988 Fourth Place 4th 5 1 3 1 3 3 Qualified as hosts
  1990 Did not qualify 2 0 2 0 1 1
  1992 Group stage 9th 2 0 1 1 1 2 6 4 0 2 11 4
  1994 Did not qualify 6 2 2 2 5 4
  1996 4 1 1 2 2 4
  1998 Quarter-finals 6th 4 2 1 1 6 3 6 4 2 0 10 1
    2000 Group stage 11th 3 1 1 1 1 2 4 2 2 0 6 4
  2002 9th 3 1 1 1 3 4 6 3 1 2 5 4
  2004 Runners-up 2nd 6 4 1 1 14 4 6 5 1 0 10 0
  2006 Group stage 13th 3 0 2 1 0 1 10 5 5 0 17 7
  2008 11th 3 1 0 2 7 6 4 3 1 0 6 1
  2010 Did not qualify 10 3 3 4 14 13
    2012 Group stage 12th 3 1 0 2 4 5 6 3 2 1 8 2
  2013 10th 3 0 3 0 3 3 2 1 0 1 4 2
  2015 Disqualified Originally qualified as hosts, then disqualified
  2017 Quarter-finals 7th 4 2 0 2 4 3 6 5 1 0 10 1
  2019 Round of 16 9th 4 3 1 0 4 1 6 3 2 1 8 3
  2021 Qualified 6 4 2 0 10 1
  2023 To be determined To be determined
  2025
Total 1 Title 18/33 65 24 23 18 74 58 118 63 31 24 182 81

Minor tournamentsEdit

Year Round Position GP W D* L GS GA
  1964 Tripoli Fair Tournament Third Place 3rd 4 2 0 2 5 5
  1965 World Military Cup Third Place 3rd 3 1 1 1 3 5
  1965 Tripoli Fair Tournament Third Place 3rd 3 1 1 1 2 1
  1966 World Military Cup Runner-up 2nd 3 0 1 2 1 4
  1966 Tripoli Fair Tournament Winner 1st 4 3 0 1 4 5
  1967 World Military Cup Third Place 3rd - - - - - -
  1974 Kuneitra Cup Winner 1st 7 6 1 0 16 5
  1980 Merdeka Tournament Winner 1st 8 5 2 1 15 7
  1985 Nehru Cup Semifinals 3rd 4 2 1 1 7 3
  1987 President's Cup Football Tournament Group stage 6th 5 2 0 3 6 6
  1988 Tournoi de France Runner-up 2nd 2 1 0 1 4 3
  1989 World Military Cup Runner-up 2nd 3 1 1 1 3 4
  1993 World Military Cup Runner-up 2nd 5 4 0 1 16 5
  1994 Friendship Tournament Runner-up 2nd 3 1 2 0 4 3
  1996 Friendship Tournament Runner-up 2nd - - - - - -
  1996 King Hassan II International Cup Tournament Third Place 3rd 2 1 1 0 4 2
  1998 King Hassan II International Cup Tournament Third Place 3rd 2 0 1 1 2 3
  1999 LG Cup (Morocco) Runner-up 2nd 2 1 0 1 2 2
  2000 King Hassan II International Cup Tournament Runner-up 2nd 2 1 0 1 2 5
  2001 Friendship Tournament Winner 1st 3 1 2 0 6 4
  2002 LG Cup (Morocco) Third Place 3rd 2 1 1 0 2 0
  2002 LG Cup (Iran) Third Place 3rd 2 0 2 0 1 1
  2004 Qatar International Friendship Tournament Winner 1st 5 4 0 1 9 4
  2011 LG Cup (Morocco) Third Place 3rd 2 0 1 1 1 2
Total 5 titles 24/24 76 38 18 20 115 79

HonoursEdit

This is a list of honours for the senior Morocco national team

AwardsEdit

African National Team of the Year

  •   First place : 1985, 1986, 1997
  •   Second place : 1993, 1998, 2003, 2004
  •   Third place : 1980
  • 3rd FIFA Best Mover of the Year: 1993

FIFA World Rankings HistoryEdit

1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
30 20 14 12 13 10 11 15 16 17 38 33 36 39 39 41 67 79 61 74 73 81 75 57 40 40 41 35 33

See alsoEdit

Other football codesEdit

NotesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Morocco - Record International Players". rsssf.com.
  2. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking". FIFA. 16 September 2021. Retrieved 16 September 2021.
  3. ^ "Morocco's FIFA World Ranking April 1998". FIFA Ranking. 22 April 1998.
  4. ^ Elo rankings change compared to one year ago. "World Football Elo Ratings". eloratings.net. 14 October 2021. Retrieved 14 October 2021.
  5. ^ "اللائحة النهائية للمنتخب الوطني لمباريات غينيا بيساو (ذهاب وإياب) وغينيا (مؤجلة)" [TThe final list of the national team matches for Guinea-Bissau (home and away) and Guinea (postponed)] (in Arabic). Royal Moroccan Football Federation. 30 September 2021.
  6. ^ Mamrud, Roberto. "Morocco - Record International Players". RSSSF.
  7. ^ a b "Morocco: FRMF to name former Fennec manager as new coach of Atlas Lions". The North Africa Post. 2 August 2019.
  8. ^ Hassanin Mubarak. "Morocco National Team Coaches". rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 15 February 2012.
  9. ^ "Morocco name former player Badou Zaki as new coach". bbc.com. BBC Sport. 2 May 2014. Retrieved 2 May 2014.
  10. ^ "Morocco unveil Frenchman Herve Renard as coach". bbc.com. BBC Sport. 16 February 2016. Retrieved 16 February 2016.

External linksEdit