Morocco national football team

The Morocco national football team (Arabic: منتخب الْمَغْرِب لِكُرَّةُ الْقَدَم) represents Morocco in men's international football, and is controlled by the Royal Moroccan Football Federation, the governing body for football in Morocco.

Morocco
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)أُسُودُ الأَطلَس
(The Atlas Lions)
AssociationRoyal Moroccan Football Federation (FRMF)
ConfederationCAF (Africa)
Sub-confederationUNAF (North Africa)
Head coachWalid Regragui
CaptainHakim Ziyech
Most capsNoureddine Naybet (115)
Top scorerAhmed Faras (36)[1]
Home stadiumVarious
FIFA codeMAR
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 13 Decrease 1 (4 April 2024)[2]
Highest10 (April 1998)
Lowest95 (September 2010)
First international
 Morocco 3–3 Iraq 
(Beirut, Lebanon; 19 October 1957)
Biggest win
 Morocco 13–1 Saudi Arabia 
(Casablanca, Morocco; 6 September 1961)
Biggest defeat
 Hungary 6–0 Morocco 
(Tokyo, Japan; 11 October 1964)
World Cup
Appearances7 (first in 1970)
Best resultFourth place (2022)
Africa Cup of Nations
Appearances20 (first in 1972)
Best resultChampions (1976)
Arab Cup
Appearances4 (first in 1998)
Best resultChampions (2012)
African Nations Championship
Appearances4 (first in 2014)
Best resultChampions (2018, 2020)

One of Africa's most successful national football teams, Morocco won the 1976 African Cup of Nations, two African Nations Championships and a FIFA Arab Cup while participating in the FIFA World Cup six times.[3] They made history in 1986, when they became the first African team to finish top of a group at a World Cup and the first African team to reach the knockout stages. However, they lost to West Germany 1–0.

Morocco defied all expectations at the 2022 FIFA World Cup, topping their group containing Croatia, Canada and Belgium. Morocco also eliminated Spain and Portugal to become the first African team to reach the semi-finals of the World Cup. They were also the third ever semi-finalist not from Europe or South America. Morocco were knocked out by France in the semi-finals and lost the third place play-off to Croatia, therefore finishing in 4th-place, their highest ever finish. Morocco is set to become the second African nation, the second MENA nation and the first North African nation to host the World Cup when it was granted host status for the 2030 edition alongside the two European countries Portugal and Spain.

The Atlas Lions were ranked 10th in the FIFA World Rankings in April 1998. They were ranked as the top African national team for three consecutive years, from 1997 to 1999, and again since December 2022. As of April 2024, Morocco is ranked as the 13th best national team in the world.[4]

History edit

Pre-independence period edit

 
Morocco national team in 1942 with Larbi Benbarek

The Moroccan national team was founded in 1928 and played its first game on 22 December of that year against the B team of France, to whom it lost 2–1. This team, formed by the best footballers of the LMFA or the Moroccan Football League (settlers or natives), was active in friendly matches against other North African teams such as those of Algeria and Tunisia. These associations of settler clubs and local footballers, in addition to having their own championship, clashed with each other in a tournament that Morocco won several times, such as in 1948–1949.

The LMFA also faced some club teams such as NK Lokomotiva Zagreb in January 1950, as well as France A and France B. Against France A the LMFA made a 1–1 draw in Casablanca in 1941.

On 9 September 1954, an earthquake struck the Algerian region of Orléansville (now Chlef) and caused the destruction of the city and the death of over 1,400 people. On 7 October 1954, the French Football Association and the Maghreb inhabitants organized a charity match to raise funds for the families of the victims of the catastrophic event. In the match, held at the Parc de Princes in Paris, a team made up of Moroccans, Algerians and Tunisians played against the national team of France. Led by star Larbi Benbarek, the Maghreb selection managed to win 3–2, a month before the Toussaint Rouge attacks by the Algerian National Liberation Front which marked the beginning of the Algerian War.

Beginning of Morocco (1955–1963) edit

 
Mohamed Massoun, Morocco's coach in the 1960s

In 1955, the Royal Moroccan Football Federation was established, at the end of the French protectorate of Morocco, which had lasted since 1912.

On 19 October 1957, at the 2nd edition of the Arab Games in Lebanon, Morocco made its debut as an independent country against Iraq, at the Camille Chamoun Sports City Stadium, and drew 3–3. At the tournament, Morocco took the first win in its history against Libya, winning 5–1, then beat Tunisia 3–1 to reach the semi-finals. After a 1–1 draw with Syria, lots were drawn to decide who would progress to the final, and Syria were selected at Morocco's expense. Morocco withdrew from the third-place play-off against Lebanon and finished fourth overall.[5]

Between 1957 and 1958, Morocco held numerous friendly matches against the National Liberation Front team, the representative of Algeria before its independence in 1958. In 1959, the team took part for the first time in an international competition, the qualifying rounds of the 1960 Rome Olympics. Drawn into a group with Tunisia and Malta, Morocco finished second on goal difference and failed to progress. That same year, the football federation of Morocco joined FIFA.

In 1960, Morocco competed in World Cup qualification for the first time. Drawn against Tunisia in the first round, Morocco won the first leg 2–1, while Tunisia won the second leg 2–1. A play-off held in Palermo, Italy also finished in a tie, so a coin toss was used to determine who progressed. Morocco won the toss, and beat Ghana 1–0 on aggregate to reach the inter-continental play-offs. Drawn against Spain, Morocco lost 4–2 on aggregate and thus failed to qualify.

In 1961, Morocco held the Pan-Arab Games and won the football tournament, winning all five of their matches. Their third match, against Saudi Arabia, resulted in Morocco's biggest-ever victory, winning 13–1.[6] They also claimed their first two wins against a European team, beating East Germany 2–1 and 2–0.

In 1963, the Moroccan team came close to qualifying for the African Cup of Nations. In the decisive play-off against Tunisia, they were defeated 4–1 in Tunis and won 4–2 at home, therefore being eliminated. At the Mediterranean Games in Naples 1963, they finished fourth after a 2–1 defeat in the final for third place against Spain's reserve team.[7]

First appearances in international competitions (1963–1976) edit

 
Morocco vs Netherlands in 1964

Morocco participated in the final phase of an international competition for the first time at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. Having qualified under the leadership of manager Mohamed Massoun, the Moroccans were included in a group of three teams due to the withdrawal of North Korea. Morocco lost both their matches, against Hungary (6–0, the team's worst-ever defeat) and Yugoslavia (3–1, despite taking the lead in the second minute via Ali Bouachra).

In 1966, the Moroccan Football Association joined the Confederation of African Football and was able to participate in the competitions organized by the CAF.

In 1968 and 1969, the team was engaged in qualifying for the 1970 World Cup in Mexico. Their debut eliminated Senegal (1–0) and Tunisia after a draw. In the final round of the preliminaries, against Sudan and Nigeria, Morocco obtained five points, finishing ahead of Nigeria. Shortly after, Morocco lost the decisive play-off against Algeria to enter the final stage of the 1970 Africa Cup of Nations.

Morocco thus became the first African national team to qualify for the World Cup after having played in an elimination tournament. The Moroccan team, coached by the Yugoslav Blagoje Vidinić, consisted entirely of players in the Moroccan league, including Driss Bamous and Ahmed Faras.

On 3 June 1970, against West Germany, Morocco opened the scoring with a goal in the 21st minute of the game scored by Houmane Jarir. In the second half, however, the Germans scored twice and won 2–1. The Atlas Lions then played against Peru, conceding three goals in ten minutes to lose 3–0. On 11 June 1970, the eliminated Moroccans drew with Bulgaria 1–1. It was the first point obtained by an African national team at the World Cup.[8]

In 1972 Africa Cup of Nations qualification, the Atlas Lions ousted Algeria, then faced Egypt, beating them 3–0 in the first leg and suffering a 3–2 defeat on the way back. Despite this, they qualified for the final phase of the continental tournament for the first time. In the group stage, they accumulated three 1–1 draws against Congo, Sudan and Zaire and were eliminated in the first round. All three Moroccan goals were scored by Ahmed Faras.

Qualifying for the 1972 Olympics with two wins and two draws, Morocco debuted in Group A with a goalless draw against the United States, then lost 3–0 against hosts West Germany and defeated Malaysia 6–0 with a Faras hat-trick, thereby advancing to the second round. Due to defeats against USSR (3–0), Denmark (3–1) and Poland (5–0), they were eliminated from the tournament; finishing bottom of their group.[9] To date, this result remains the best performance of the Atlas Lions at the Olympic football tournament.

In the 1974 World Cup qualifiers, Morocco successfully passed three qualifying rounds before entering the final round alongside Zambia and Zaire. Losing 4–0 away against Zambia, the Moroccans bounced back in the second game, defeating the same opponent 2–0 at home. They then went to Zaire for their third game but lost 3–0, conceding all three goals in the second half, with Faras leaving the field due to injury. Morocco filed an appeal, trying to get the match to be replayed; it was dismissed by FIFA. In protest, Morocco withdrew from the qualifiers causing the Atlas Lions to miss their final game at home against Zaire which had already qualified for the finals, with FIFA awarding Zaire a 2–0 win on walkover. For the same reason, Morocco also decided not to take part in the 1974 African Cup of Nations qualification.

In 1974, Morocco played only two games, both against Algeria, achieving a 2–0 win and a 0–0 draw. Morocco then resumed its regular FIFA and CAF competitions, qualifying for the 1976 Africa Cup of Nations by eliminating Ghana in the last round, but failed to qualify for the 1976 Olympics, being eliminated by Nigeria.

Between successes and defeats (1976–1986) edit

Morocco, coached by the Romanian Virgil Mărdărescu and captained by Faras, took the continental throne at 1976 African Cup of Nations, in only the country's second participation in the competition. Ahmed Makrouh scored in the final to equalize at 1–1, which gave Morocco the first, and to date, only cup in its history.[10]

After failing to qualify for the 1974 FIFA World Cup, they also did not make 1978 and 1982. At the 1978 Africa Cup of Nations, they were eliminated in the first round, while at the 1980 Africa Cup of Nations they finished in third place, beating Egypt 2–0.[11] They then won the 1983 Mediterranean Games, played at home, thanks to a 3–0 win in the final against Turkey B.[12]

Morocco did not qualify for either the 1982 or 1984 Africa Cup of Nations. Two years later, they finished fourth, losing 3–2 in the third-place play-off to Ivory Coast.[13]

Golden generation (1986–2000) edit

Morocco qualified for the 1986 FIFA World Cup which took place in Mexico, and surprisingly topped a group with Portugal, England and Poland, thanks to two draws against the English and Polish[14] and a 3–1 win against the Portuguese.[15] However, they were narrowly eliminated by West Germany in the first knockout round, thanks to a goal from Lothar Matthäus one minute from the end of regulation time. Morocco became the first African and Arab national team to advance from the first round of the World Cup.[16]

Two years later, the Moroccan team presented itself at the 1988 African Cup of Nations as a host country with high expectations. After winning in the first round, they were eliminated in the semifinals by Cameroon and finished in fourth place after losing the third-place play-off against Algeria 1–1 after extra time, 4–3 after penalties.

Failure to qualify for the 1990 FIFA World Cup opened a period of crisis. In the 1992 African Cup of Nations, the team was eliminated in the first round. They then did not participate in the 1994 or 1996 African Cup tournaments. They, however, did qualify for the 1994 World Cup in the United States and the 1998 tournament in France.[17][18]

At the 1998 Africa Cup of Nations, after winning their group, Morocco were defeated by South Africa 2–1.[19]

Difficult years (2006–2017) edit

 
Morocco national team in 2011

Morocco took part in the 2004 African Cup of Nations, drawn into Group D defeating Nigeria 1–0, defeating Benin 4–0[20] and drawing 1–1 with South Africa. Morocco qualified to the knockout stages, facing Algeria; they eventually won 3–1 in extra time,[21] and 4–0 against Mali in the semi-final.[22] They lost the 2004 African Cup of Nations Final against Tunisia 2–1.[23]

In 2012, the national team won the Arab Cup, topping their group, defeating Iraq in the semi-final and Libya in the final.[24]

In 2014, Morocco debuted in the African Nations Championship after failing to qualify in the 2009 and 2011 editions. Led by coach Hassan Benabicha, Morocco were eliminated in the second round after losing 4–3 to Nigeria in the quarter-finals.[25] They managed to qualify for the 2016 African Nations Championship, but were eliminated in the group stages.[26] Morocco hosted the 2018 African Nations Championship, which included a victory for the home nation, the third North African country to win the competition's title.[27][28][29]

Second golden generation (2017–present) edit

 
Morocco starting XI against Iran in the 2018 World Cup

Morocco returned to the World Cup after a 20-year absence in 2018.[30] The North Africans were drawn in Group B with World Cup favourites Spain, Portugal, and Iran.[31] In their opening game against Iran, Morocco showed full dedication but lost 1–0 in the final minutes of the match, scored by an own goal.[32] In their second game, Morocco faced Portugal but ended losing 1–0 by a goal scored by Cristiano Ronaldo.[33] In the last match against Spain they took the lead 2–1 but was unable to keep it, and drew 2–2, scored by Khalid Boutaïb and Youssef En-Nesyri.[34]

Morocco entered the 2019 AFCON with high confidence and players claiming them to be the favorite to win.[35][36] However, in spite of three straight group stage wins, Morocco were shockingly knocked out by Benin in the round of sixteen.[37][38]

At the 2020 African Nations Championship in Cameroon,[39] Morocco won their second CHAN title, in its second consecutive final appearance. Captained by Ayoub El Kaabi, they defeated Togo (1–0),[40] Rwanda (0–0),[41] the Uganda (5–2),[42] Zambia (3–1),[43] and Cameroon (4–0)[44] on the way to a final against Mali in Yaoundé. Morocco won 2–0, with both goals scored late into the second half by Soufiane Bouftini and Ayoub El Kaabi.[45] Morocco thus became the first team to win back-to-back titles.[46] Soufiane Rahimi went on to be named Total Man of the tournament after an astonishing performance scoring a total of 5 goals.[47]

In December 2021, Morocco started its venture at the 2021 FIFA Arab Cup's Group C, along with Jordan, Palestine and Saudi Arabia. Morocco opened the tournament with a 4–0 win against Palestine,[48] Morocco then managed to overcome a highly defensive Jordan with another 4–0 triumph,[49] They won their final match in a 1–0 victory against Saudi Arabia.[50] they were eliminated in the quarter-final after penalty-shootout against Algeria.[51]

After easily topping their 2021 Africa Cup of Nations qualification group which consisted of Mauritania, Burundi, and Central African Republic, Morocco were one of the favorites to win the 2021 edition of the tournament hosted in Cameroon.[52] Morocco were drawn into group E that included Gabon, Ghana and Comoros. Morocco won its first game against Ghana scored by Sofiane Boufal in the final minutes of the game.[53] In their second game against Comoros, they claimed a 2–0 victory.[54] Their final match against Gabon ended in a draw, making Morocco reach the round of 16 after ending up first in the group.[55] They defeated Malawi 2–1 in the round of 16.[56] They were eliminated in the quarter-final after a 2–1 loss against Egypt.[57]

After qualifying for the 2022 FIFA World Cup by winning the third round of CAF qualifiers,[58] the team was drawn in Group F along with Croatia, Belgium, and Canada. Morocco were not expected to qualify, but after holding previous runners-up Croatia to a 0–0 draw and shocking previous third place Belgium 2–0, a 2–1 win over Canada meant they finished top of the group and advanced to the round of 16 for the first time since 1986.[59][60] In the round of 16, they met Spain, drawing 0–0. In the subsequent penalty shootout, goalkeeper Yassine Bounou saved two penalties, and Achraf Hakimi scored the decisive penalty with a panenka penalty for Morocco to advance to the quarter-finals for the first time.[61] They advanced further to the semi-finals winning against favourite Portugal, 1–0, with a powerful header by Youssef En-Nesyri.[62][63][64] That made Morocco the first African and Arab team to qualify for the semi-finals.[65][66]

However, they lost to France in the semi-final, 2–0 on 14 December at the Al Bayt Stadium in Al Khor, putting an end to Morocco's World Cup run.[67] They played Croatia in the third place play-off on 17 December at the Khalifa International Stadium in Ar-Rayyan, a rematch of the earlier group stage meeting.[68] They lost 2–1 to the latter, and ended their World Cup campaign at fourth place.[69] The team would go on to donate their entire World Cup earnings from the tournament to charities within Morocco that help with poverty that affects children and families in the country by the earthquake.[70]

Home stadium edit

From 2011, the Atlas Lions played most of their matches in the new Marrakesh Stadium, which has a capacity of 45,240 seats. The latter is considered to bring luck to the Moroccan team; they won several important matches there in front of a large audience, notably beating Algeria 4–0 in qualification for the 2012 Africa Cup of Nations.[71]

During Badou Ezzaki's tenure as coach from 2014 to 2016, the Moroccan team played most of its matches at the Adrar stadium in Agadir,[72][73] which has a capacity of 45,480. A friendly match was played there during the period of Hervé Renard between Morocco and the Netherlands in 2017.

Morocco also has other large stadiums built in the 2000s such as the Fez Stadium which has 45,000 seats and which hosts the two clubs of the city: MAS Fez and Wydad de Fès.

Kit suppliers edit

Morocco's home colours are most red shirts and green shorts and socks, away colours are usually all white or all green.

Kit provider Period
  Adidas 1976–1993
  Lotto 1994–1997
  Puma 1998–2002
  Nike 2003–2006
  Puma 2007–2011
  Adidas 2012–2019
  Puma 2019–present[74]

Results and fixtures edit

The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

  Win   Draw   Loss   Fixture

2023 edit

12 June Friendly Morocco   0–0   Cape Verde Rabat, Morocco
20:00 UTC+1 Report Stadium: Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium
Attendance: 55,500
Referee: Mahamadou Kéïta (Mali)
17 June 2023 AFCON qualification South Africa   2–1   Morocco Johannesburg, South Africa
17:00 UTC+1
Report
Stadium: Soccer City
Referee: Alhadi Allaou Mahamat (Chad)
12 September Friendly Morocco   1–0   Burkina Faso Lens, France
19:30 UTC+1
Report Stadium: Stade Bollaert-Delelis
Referee: Jérémie Pignard (France)
14 October Friendly Ivory Coast   1–1   Morocco Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Report
Stadium: Alassane Ouattara Stadium
17 October 2023 AFCON qualification Morocco   3–0   Liberia Agadir, Morocco
20:00 UTC+1
Report Stadium: Adrar Stadium
Referee: Ahmad Imtehaz Heeralall (Mauritius)
Note: Match postponed from 9 September due to the 2023 Marrakesh-Safi earthquake.
16 November 2026 World Cup qualification Morocco   Cancelled   Eritrea Agadir, Morocco
Stadium: Stade Adrar
Note: Eritrea withdrew from the qualifiers before the first matches were played.
21 November 2026 World Cup qualification Tanzania   0–2   Morocco Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
22:00 UTC+3 Report
Stadium: Benjamin Mkapa National Stadium
Attendance: 45,394
Referee: Abongile Tom (South Africa)

2024 edit

11 January Friendly Sierra Leone   1–3   Morocco San Pédro, Ivory Coast
15:00 UTC±0}
Report
Stadium: Laurent Pokou Stadium
17 January 2023 AFCON GS Morocco   3–0   Tanzania San Pédro, Ivory Coast
17:00 UTC±0
Report Stadium: Laurent Pokou Stadium
Attendance: 15,478
Referee: Alhadj Allaou Mahamat (Chad)
21 January 2023 AFCON GS Morocco   1–1   DR Congo San Pédro, Ivory Coast
14:00 UTC±0
Report
Stadium: Laurent Pokou Stadium
Attendance: 13,342
Referee: Peter Waweru (Kenya)
24 January 2023 AFCON GS Zambia   0–1   Morocco San Pédro, Ivory Coast
20:00 UTC±0 Report
Stadium: Laurent Pokou Stadium
Attendance: 15,231
Referee: Patrice Tanguy (Gabon)
30 January 2023 AFCON R16 Morocco   0–2   South Africa San Pédro, Ivory Coast
20:00 UTC±0 Report
Stadium: Laurent Pokou Stadium, San Pédro
Referee: Mahmood Ismail (Sudan)
22 March Friendly Morocco   1–0   Angola Agadir, Morocco
19:00 UTC±0
Report Stadium: Adrar Stadium
Referee: Boubou Traoré (Mali)
26 March Friendly Morocco   0–0   Mauritania Agadir, Morocco
19:00 UTC±0 Report Stadium: Adrar Stadium
Referee: Mohamed Moussa (Niger)
June 2026 World Cup qualification Morocco   v   Zambia TBD, Morocco
Stadium: TBD
June 2026 World Cup qualification Congo   v   Morocco TBD, Congo
Stadium: TBD

Coaching staff edit

Position Name
Head coach   Walid Regragui[75]
Assistant coach   Rachid Benmahmoud
  Gharib Amzine
Goalkeeping coach   Houcine Mouelhi
Fitness coach   Aymen Chabane
Video Analyst   Moussa El Habachi
Technical director   Abdelilah Moussaoui
  Fathi Jamal

Coaching history edit

As of 30 January 2023[76]

Players edit

Current squad edit

The following 24 players were called up for friendly matches against Angola and Mauritainia, on 22 and 26 March 2024 respectively.

Caps and goals are correct as of 26 March 2024, after the match against   Mauritania.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Yassine Bounou (1991-04-05) 5 April 1991 (age 33) 65 0   Al-Hilal
12 1GK Munir Mohamedi (1989-05-10) 10 May 1989 (age 34) 46 0   Al-Wehda
22 1GK Mehdi Benabid (1998-01-24) 24 January 1998 (age 26) 0 0   AS FAR

2 2DF Achraf Hakimi (1998-11-04) 4 November 1998 (age 25) 75 9   Paris Saint-Germain
5 2DF Nayef Aguerd (1996-03-30) 30 March 1996 (age 28) 41 1   West Ham United
25 2DF Yahia Attiyat Allah (1995-03-02) 2 March 1995 (age 29) 19 0   Sochi
3 2DF Mohamed Chibi (1993-01-21) 21 January 1993 (age 31) 7 1   Pyramids
15 2DF Achraf Dari (1999-05-06) 6 May 1999 (age 24) 7 1   Charleroi
26 2DF Chadi Riad (2003-07-17) 17 July 2003 (age 20) 2 0   Real Betis
18 2DF Abdel Abqar (1999-03-10) 10 March 1999 (age 25) 1 0   Alavés
11 2DF Yusi (2005-10-07) 7 October 2005 (age 18) 0 0   Real Madrid U19

4 3MF Sofyan Amrabat (1996-08-21) 21 August 1996 (age 27) 56 0   Manchester United
8 3MF Azzedine Ounahi (2000-04-19) 19 April 2000 (age 24) 28 4   Marseille
23 3MF Bilal El Khannous (2004-05-10) 10 May 2004 (age 19) 11 0   Genk
24 3MF Amir Richardson (2002-01-24) 24 January 2002 (age 22) 6 0   Reims
14 3MF Oussama El Azzouzi (2001-05-29) 29 May 2001 (age 22) 3 0   Bologna
10 3MF Brahim Díaz (1999-08-03) 3 August 1999 (age 24) 2 0   Real Madrid

19 4FW Youssef En-Nesyri (1997-06-01) 1 June 1997 (age 26) 71 20   Sevilla
7 4FW Hakim Ziyech (1993-03-19) 19 March 1993 (age 31) 61 22   Galatasaray
20 4FW Ayoub El Kaabi (1993-06-25) 25 June 1993 (age 30) 33 10   Olympiacos
21 4FW Amine Adli (2000-05-10) 10 May 2000 (age 23) 9 1   Bayer Leverkusen
9 4FW Soufiane Rahimi (1996-06-02) 2 June 1996 (age 27) 8 0   Al Ain
16 4FW Ilias Akhomach (2004-04-16) 16 April 2004 (age 20) 2 0   Villarreal
13 4FW Eliesse Ben Seghir (2005-02-16) 16 February 2005 (age 19) 2 0   Monaco

Recent call-ups edit

The following players have been called up for the team in the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Anas Zniti (1988-08-28) 28 August 1988 (age 35) 5 0   Raja Casablanca 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
GK Youssef El Motie (1994-12-16) 16 December 1994 (age 29) 0 0   Wydad Casablanca 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
GK Amine El Ouaad (1995-12-08) 8 December 1995 (age 28) 0 0   Nahdat Berkane 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
GK Rachid Ghanimi (2001-04-25) 25 April 2001 (age 22) 0 0   FUS Rabat v.   South Africa, 17 June 2023
GK Ahmed Reda Tagnaouti (1996-04-05) 5 April 1996 (age 28) 3 0   MAS v.   Brazil, 25 March 2023 INJ

DF Romain Saïss (captain) (1990-03-26) 26 March 1990 (age 34) 82 3   Al-Shabab 2023 Africa Cup of Nations
DF Noussair Mazraoui (1997-11-14) 14 November 1997 (age 26) 28 2   Bayern Munich 2023 Africa Cup of Nations
DF Yunis Abdelhamid (1987-07-28) 28 July 1987 (age 36) 14 0   Reims 2023 Africa Cup of Nations
DF Jawad El Yamiq (1992-02-29) 29 February 1992 (age 32) 18 2   Al-Wehda 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
DF Adam Masina (1994-01-02) 2 January 1994 (age 30) 16 0   Udinese 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
DF Samy Mmaee (1996-09-08) 8 September 1996 (age 27) 10 0   Ferencváros 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
DF Hamza El Moussaoui (1993-04-07) 7 April 1993 (age 31) 6 1   Moghreb Tétouan 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
DF Badr Benoun (1993-09-30) 30 September 1993 (age 30) 6 0   Qatar SC 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
DF Ayoub El Amloud (1994-04-08) 8 April 1994 (age 30) 1 0   Wydad Casablanca 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
DF Omar El Hilali (2003-09-12) 12 September 2003 (age 20) 0 0   Espanyol 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
DF Ismaël Kandouss (1997-11-12) 12 November 1997 (age 26) 1 0   Gent v.   South Africa, 17 June 2023
DF Fahd Moufi (1996-05-05) 5 May 1996 (age 27) 0 0   Hajduk Split v.   South Africa, 17 June 2023
DF Ayoub Amraoui (2004-05-14) 14 May 2004 (age 19) 0 0   Nice v.   Peru, 28 March 2023

MF Selim Amallah (1996-11-15) 15 November 1996 (age 27) 37 4   Valencia 2023 Africa Cup of Nations
MF Amine Harit (1997-06-18) 18 June 1997 (age 26) 23 1   Marseille 2023 Africa Cup of Nations
MF Ismael Saibari (2001-01-28) 28 January 2001 (age 23) 6 0   PSV 2023 Africa Cup of Nations
MF Nordin Amrabat (1987-03-31) 31 March 1987 (age 37) 64 7   AEK Athens 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
MF Ilias Chair (1997-10-30) 30 October 1997 (age 26) 12 1   Queens Park Rangers 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
MF Yahya Jabrane (1991-06-18) 18 June 1991 (age 32) 8 0   Wydad Casablanca 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
MF Youssef Maleh (1998-08-22) 22 August 1998 (age 25) 1 0   Empoli 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
MF Yassine Kechta (2002-02-25) 25 February 2002 (age 22) 0 0   Le Havre 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
MF Benjamin Bouchouari (2001-11-13) 13 November 2001 (age 22) 0 0   Saint-Étienne 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
MF Neil El Aynaoui (2001-07-02) 2 July 2001 (age 22) 0 0   Lens 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
MF Imran Louza (1999-05-01) 1 May 1999 (age 24) 15 2   Watford v.   South Africa, 17 June 2023
MF Abdelhamid Sabiri (1996-11-28) 28 November 1996 (age 27) 11 2   Al-Fayha v.   South Africa, 17 June 2023

FW Sofiane Boufal (1993-09-17) 17 September 1993 (age 30) 46 8   Al-Rayyan 2023 Africa Cup of Nations
FW Abde Ezzalzouli (2001-12-17) 17 December 2001 (age 22) 15 0   Real Betis 2023 Africa Cup of Nations
FW Tarik Tissoudali (1993-04-02) 2 April 1993 (age 31) 14 2   Gent 2023 Africa Cup of Nations
FW Abderrazak Hamdallah (1990-12-17) 17 December 1990 (age 33) 24 6   Al-Ittihad 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
FW Ryan Mmaee (1997-11-01) 1 November 1997 (age 26) 12 4   Stoke City 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
FW Munir El Haddadi (1995-09-01) 1 September 1995 (age 28) 11 2   Las Palmas 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
FW Walid Cheddira (1998-01-22) 22 January 1998 (age 26) 6 0   Frosinone 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
FW Mourad Batna (1990-06-27) 27 June 1990 (age 33) 2 0   Al-Fateh 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
FW Sofiane Diop (2000-06-09) 9 June 2000 (age 23) 0 0   Nice 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
FW Ibrahim Salah (2001-08-30) 30 August 2001 (age 22) 0 0   Rennes 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
FW Nabil Alioui (1999-02-18) 18 February 1999 (age 25) 0 0   Le Havre 2023 Africa Cup of Nations PRE
FW Zakaria Aboukhlal (2000-02-18) 18 February 2000 (age 24) 17 3   Toulouse v.   Burkina Faso, 12 September 2023INJ
FW Oussama Idrissi (1996-02-26) 26 February 1996 (age 28) 9 0   Pachuca v.   South Africa, 17 June 2023
FW Anass Zaroury (2000-11-07) 7 November 2000 (age 23) 4 0   Hull City v.   South Africa, 17 June 2023

DEC Player declined the call-up to the squad
INJ Did not make it to the current squad due to injury
PRE Preliminary squad / standby
RET Player retired from internationals
SUS Player is suspended
WD Player withdrew from the roster for non-injury related reasons

Previous squads edit

Player records edit

As of 22 April 2024[81]
Players in bold are still active with Morocco.

Most appearances edit

 
Noureddine Naybet is Morocco's most capped player with 115 appearances.
Rank Player Caps Goals Career
1 Noureddine Naybet 115 4 1990–2006
2 Ahmed Faras 94 36 1966–1979
3 Romain Saïss 82 3 2012–present
4 Youssef Safri 79 8 1999–2009
5 Houssine Kharja 78 12 2004–2015
Ezzaki Badou 0 1979–1992
7 Abdelmajid Dolmy 76 2 1973–1988
8 Achraf Hakimi 75 9 2016–present
9 Youssef Chippo 73 9 1996–2006
Mohamed Hazzaz 0 1969–1979

Top goalscorers edit

 
Ahmed Faras is Morocco's top scorer with 36 goals.
Rank Player Goals Caps Ratio Career
1 Ahmed Faras 36 94 0.38 1966–1979
2 Salaheddine Bassir 27 59 0.46 1994–2002
3 Ayoub El Kaabi 22 44 0.50 2018–present
Hakim Ziyech 22 60 0.37 2015–present
5 Youssef En-Nesyri 20 71 0.29 2016–present
6 Abdeljalil Hadda 19 48 0.4 1995–2002
7 Hassan Amcharrat 18 39 0.46 1971–1979
Marouane Chamakh 65 0.28 2003–2014
9 Abdeslam Laghrissi 17 35 0.49 1984–1995
10 Youssef El-Arabi 16 46 0.35 2010–present
Youssouf Hadji 64 0.25 2003–2012

Competitive record edit

FIFA World Cup edit

Morocco's national football team has participated in the World Cup six times. Their best performance was in the 2022 tournament where they finished in fourth place, becoming the first African and Arab nation to reach the semi-finals of the tournament.

FIFA World Cup record Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
  1930 to   1958 Not a FIFA member Not a FIFA member
  1962 Did not qualify 7 2 2 3 7 8
  1966 Withdrew Withdrew
  1970 Group stage 14th 3 0 1 2 2 6 10 4 4 2 11 7
  1974 Did not qualify 10 4 3 3 12 13
  1978 2 0 2 0 2 2
  1982 8 3 2 3 5 6
  1986 Round of 16 11th 4 1 2 1 3 2 8 5 2 1 12 1
  1990 Did not qualify 6 1 3 2 4 5
  1994 Group stage 23rd 3 0 0 3 2 5 10 7 2 1 19 4
  1998 18th 3 1 1 1 5 5 6 5 1 0 14 2
    2002 Did not qualify 10 6 3 1 11 3
  2006 10 5 5 0 17 7
  2010 10 3 3 4 14 13
  2014 6 2 3 1 9 8
  2018 Group stage 27th 3 0 1 2 2 4 8 4 3 1 13 1
  2022 Fourth place 4th 7 3 2 2 6 5 8 7 1 0 25 3
      2026 To be determined To be determined
      2030 Qualified as co-hosts Qualified as co-hosts
  2034 To be determined To be determined
Total Fourth place 6/16 23 5 7 11 20 27 119 58 39 22 175 83

Africa Cup of Nations edit

Africa Cup of Nations record Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
  1957 Not affiliated to CAF Not affiliated to CAF
  1959
  1962 Qualified, but withdrew Withdrew
  1963 Did not qualify 2 1 0 1 5 6
  1965 Did not enter Did not enter
  1968
  1970 Did not qualify 2 1 0 1 1 2
  1972 Group stage 5th 3 0 3 0 3 3 4 2 0 2 9 6
  1974 Did not enter Did not enter
  1976 Champions 1st 6 4 2 0 11 6 6 4 0 2 13 4
  1978 Group stage 6th 3 1 1 1 2 4 Qualified as defending champions
  1980 Third place 3rd 5 2 1 2 4 3 4 2 1 1 14 5
  1982 Did not qualify 4 3 0 1 8 4
  1984 4 1 2 1 4 2
  1986 Fourth place 4th 5 1 2 2 4 5 2 1 1 0 1 0
  1988 Fourth place 4th 5 1 3 1 3 3 Qualified as hosts
  1990 Did not qualify 2 0 1 1 1 4
  1992 Group stage 9th 2 0 1 1 1 2 6 4 0 2 11 4
  1994 Did not qualify 6 2 2 2 5 4
  1996 4 1 1 2 2 4
  1998 Quarter-finals 6th 4 2 1 1 6 3 6 4 2 0 10 1
    2000 Group stage 11th 3 1 1 1 1 2 4 2 2 0 6 4
  2002 9th 3 1 1 1 3 4 6 3 1 2 5 4
  2004 Runners-up 2nd 6 4 1 1 14 4 6 5 1 0 10 0
  2006 Group stage 13th 3 0 2 1 0 1 10 5 5 0 17 7
  2008 11th 3 1 0 2 7 6 4 3 1 0 6 1
  2010 Did not qualify 10 3 3 4 14 13
    2012 Group stage 12th 3 1 0 2 4 5 6 3 2 1 8 2
  2013 10th 3 0 3 0 3 3 2 1 0 1 4 2
  2015 Disqualified Originally qualified as hosts, then disqualified
  2017 Quarter-finals 7th 4 2 0 2 4 3 6 5 1 0 10 1
  2019 Round of 16 9th 4 3 1 0 4 1 6 3 2 1 8 3
  2021 Quarter-finals 5th 5 3 1 1 8 5 6 4 2 0 10 1
  2023 Round of 16 11th 4 2 1 1 5 3 4 3 0 1 8 3
  2025 Qualified as hosts Qualified as hosts
      2027 To be determined To be determined
Total 1 Title 19/36 74 29 25 20 87 66 122 66 31 25 190 84

African Nations Championship edit

African Nations Championship Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
  2009 Did not qualify 4 1 2 1 5 6
  2011 2 0 2 0 3 3
  2014 Quarter-finals 8th 4 1 2 1 7 6 2 1 1 0 1 0
  2016 Group stage 10th 3 1 1 1 4 2 4 3 1 0 11 3
  2018 Champions 1st 6 5 1 0 16 2 2 1 1 0 4 2
  2020 Champions 1st 6 5 1 0 15 3 2 1 1 0 3 0
  2022 Qualified, but withdrew Qualified
Total 2 titles 4/6 19 12 5 2 42 13 16 7 8 1 27 14

Olympic games edit

Summer Olympics
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
18961956 Not affiliated
  1960 Did not qualify
  1964 Round 1 13 2 0 0 2 1 9
  1968 Qualified, but withdrew
  1972 Round 2 8 6 1 1 4 7 14
  1976 Did not qualify
  1980
  1984 Round 1 12 3 1 0 2 1 4
  1988 Did not qualify
Since 1992 See Morocco national under-23 football team
Total Round 2 7/26 23 3 5 15 17 48
  • Football at the Summer Olympics has been an under-23 tournament since the 1992 edition.

African Games edit

African Games
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1965 Did not enter
  1973
  1978
  1987
  1991
  1995
  1999
  2003
  2007
  2011
  2015
  2019 Group stage 5th 3 1 1 1 3 4
  2023 To be determined
All Total Group stage 1/12 3 1 1 1 3 4

Mediterranean Games edit

1951 to 1987 senior teams, from 1991 youth teams.

Mediterranean Games
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1951 Did not enter
  1955
  1959
  1963 Fourth place 4th 4 2 0 2 4 6
  1967 Group stage 7th 3 1 0 2 4 6
  1971 Disqualified
  1975 Fourth place 4th 5 1 4 0 3 2
  1979 Group stage 6th 3 0 2 1 2 3
  1983   Gold Medal 1st 4 3 1 0 8 2
  1987 Group stage 5th 3 1 1 1 2 2
Since 1991 See Morocco national under-23 football team or Morocco national under-20 football team
Total 2 Title 7/10 22 8 8 6 23 21

Arab Games edit

Arab Games
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1953 Did not enter
  1957 Fourth place 4th 4 2 2 0 12 6
  1961   Gold Medal 1st 5 5 0 0 26 6
  1965 Did not enter
  1976   Gold Medal 1st 6 4 2 0 12 0
  1985   Silver Medal 2nd 5 3 1 1 9 3
  1992 Did not enter
  1997
  1999
  2004 No football tournament
  2007 Did not enter
  2011
  2023
Total 2 titles 4/12 20 14 5 1 59 15

FIFA Arab Cup edit

FIFA Arab Cup
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1963 Did not participate
  1964
  1966
  1985
  1988
  1992
  1998 Group stage 5th 2 1 0 1 2 2
  2002 Third place 3rd 5 1 2 2 5 6
  2009 Cancelled
  2012 Champions 1st 5 4 1 0 11 2
  2021 Quarter-finals 5th 4 3 1 0 11 2
Total 1 Title 4/10 16 9 4 3 29 12

Minor tournaments edit

Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1958 Djamila Bouhired Tournament Third place 3rd 2 1 0 1 3 3
  1964 Tripoli Fair Tournament Third place 3rd 4 2 0 2 5 5
  1965 World Military Cup Third place 3rd 3 1 1 1 3 5
  1965 Tripoli Fair Tournament Third place 3rd 3 1 1 1 2 1
  1966 World Military Cup Runners-up 2nd 3 0 1 2 1 4
  1966 Tripoli Fair Tournament Winners 1st 4 3 0 1 4 5
  1967 World Military Cup Third place 3rd - - - - - -
  1974 Kuneitra Cup Winners 1st 7 6 1 0 16 5
  1980 Merdeka Tournament Winners 1st 8 5 2 1 15 7
  1982 Beijing International Friendship Tournaments Winners 1st 5 1 4 0 7 6
  1985 Nehru Cup Semi-finals 3rd 4 2 1 1 7 3
  1987 President's Cup Football Tournament Group stage 6th 5 2 0 3 6 6
  1988 Tournoi de France Runners-up 2nd 2 1 0 1 4 3
  1989 World Military Cup Runners-up 2nd 3 1 1 1 3 4
  1993 World Military Cup Runners-up 2nd 5 4 0 1 16 5
  1994 Friendship Tournament Runners-up 2nd 3 1 2 0 4 3
  1996 Friendship Tournament Runners-up 2nd 3 1 1 1 4 3
  1996 King Hassan II International Cup Tournament Third place 3rd 2 1 1 0 4 2
  1998 King Hassan II International Cup Tournament Third place 3rd 2 0 1 1 2 3
  1998 African Military Cup Fourth place 4th - - - - - -
  1999 LG Cup (Morocco) Runners-up 2nd 2 1 0 1 2 2
  2000 King Hassan II International Cup Tournament Runners-up 2nd 2 1 0 1 2 5
  2001 Friendship Tournament Winners 1st 3 1 2 0 6 4
  2002 LG Cup (Morocco) Third place 3rd 2 1 1 0 2 0
  2002 LG Cup (Iran) Third place 3rd 2 0 2 0 1 1
  2004 Qatar International Friendship Tournament Winners 1st 5 4 0 1 9 4
  2011 LG Cup (Morocco) Third place 3rd 2 0 1 1 1 2
  2015 Toulon Tournament Runners-up 2nd 5 2 2 1 9 7
Total 6 Titles 28/28 91 43 25 23 138 98

Head-to-head performance edit

Correct as of 30 January 2024.[82]

Team Confederation GP W D L GF GA GD Win% Loss%
  Albania UEFA 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0% 0%
  Algeria CAF 34 11 12 9 31 32 −1 47.22% 19.44%
  Angola CAF 7 4 2 1 11 7 +4 57.14% 14.29%
  Argentina CONMEBOL 3 0 0 3 1 5 −4 0% 100%
  Armenia UEFA 1 1 0 0 6 0 +6 100% 0%
  Australia AFC 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 0% 100%
  Austria UEFA 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 100% 0%
  Bahrain AFC 2 2 0 0 5 0 +5 100% 0%
  Belgium UEFA 4 2 0 2 6 6 0 50% 50%
  Benin CAF 6 5 1 0 20 3 +17 83.33% 0%
  Botswana CAF 2 2 0 0 2 0 +2 100% 0%
  Brazil CONMEBOL 4 1 0 3 2 8 −6 25% 75%
  Bulgaria UEFA 6 2 3 1 10 5 +5 33.33% 16.67%
  Burkina Faso CAF 12 8 2 2 17 6 +11 66.67% 16.67%
  Burundi CAF 2 2 0 0 4 0 +4 100% 0%
  Cameroon CAF 13 2 5 6 10 12 −2 15.38% 46.15%
  Canada CONCACAF 4 3 1 0 10 4 +6 75% 0%
  Cape Verde CAF 4 2 2 0 4 1 +3 50% 0%
  Central African Republic CAF 5 3 2 0 10 1 +9 60% 0%
  Chile CONMEBOL 2 1 1 0 3 1 +2 50% 0%
  China AFC 1 0 1 0 3 3 0 0% 0%
  Colombia CONMEBOL 1 0 0 1 0 2 −2 0% 100%
  Comoros CAF 3 2 1 0 5 2 +3 66.67% 0%
  Congo CAF 5 3 2 0 6 2 +4 60% 0%
  Costa Rica CONCACAF 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 100% 0%
  Croatia UEFA 3 0 2 1 3 4 −1 0% 33.33%
  Czech Republic UEFA 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0% 0%
  Denmark UEFA 2 1 0 1 5 5 0 50% 50%
  DR Congo CAF 17 5 9 3 23 14 +9 29.41% 17.65%
  East Germany UEFA 4 3 0 1 8 5 +3 75% 25%
  Egypt CAF 30 14 12 4 35 18 +17 46.67% 13.33%
  England UEFA 2 0 1 1 0 1 −1 0% 50%
  Equatorial Guinea CAF 5 4 0 1 10 2 +2 80% 20%
  Estonia UEFA 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 100% 0%
  Ethiopia CAF 7 7 0 0 16 0 +16 100% 0%
  Finland UEFA 2 0 1 1 0 1 −1 0% 50%
  France UEFA 6 0 2 4 6 14 −8 0% 66.67%
  Gabon CAF 19 9 4 6 38 20 +18 47.37% 31.58%
  Gambia CAF 8 6 1 1 14 2 +12 75% 12.5%
  Georgia UEFA 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 100% 0%
  Germany[A] UEFA 6 0 0 6 3 17 −14 0% 100%
  Ghana CAF 11 5 3 3 8 8 0 45.45% 27.27%
  Greece UEFA 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0% 0%
  Guinea CAF 14 6 6 2 19 12 +7 42.86% 14.29%
  Guinea-Bissau CAF 2 2 0 0 8 0 +8 100% 0%
  Hong Kong AFC 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0% 0%
  Hungary UEFA 3 0 0 3 2 12 −10 0% 100%
  India AFC 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 100% 0%
  Indonesia AFC 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 100% 0%
  Iran AFC 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 0% 100%
  Iraq AFC 10 3 4 3 6 10 −4 30% 30%
  Italy UEFA 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 0% 100%
  Ivory Coast CAF 22 7 8 7 28 26 +2 31.82% 31.82%
  Jamaica CONCACAF 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 100% 0%
  Jordan AFC 4 4 0 0 12 2 +10 100% 0%
  Kenya CAF 5 3 2 0 10 2 +8 60% 0%
  Kuwait AFC 6 3 2 1 14 9 +5 50% 16.67%
  Lebanon AFC 3 2 0 1 5 2 +3 66.67% 33.33%
  Liberia CAF 5 4 0 1 14 3 +11 80% 20%
  Libya CAF 20 10 6 4 34 18 +16 50% 20%
  Luxembourg UEFA 3 3 0 0 6 1 +5 100% 0%
  Malawi CAF 11 7 3 1 17 4 +13 63.64% 9.09%
  Malaysia AFC 4 2 1 1 9 4 +5 50% 50%
  Mali CAF 20 9 6 5 33 12 +21 45% 25%
  Malta UEFA 3 2 1 0 7 4 +3 66.67% 0%
  Mauritania CAF 10 7 3 0 27 5 +22 70% 0%
  Mexico CONCACAF 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 100% 0%
  Mozambique CAF 4 3 0 1 11 2 +9 75% 25%
  Myanmar AFC 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 0% 0%
  Namibia CAF 7 6 1 0 15 2 +13 85.71% 0%
  Netherlands UEFA 3 1 0 2 4 5 −1 33.33% 66.67%
  New Zealand OFC 2 2 0 0 6 0 +6 100% 0%
  Niger CAF 7 6 0 1 16 2 +14 85.71% 14.29%
  Nigeria CAF 11 6 2 3 14 8 +6 54.55% 27.27%
  Northern Ireland UEFA 2 0 1 1 2 3 −1 0% 50%
  Norway UEFA 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 0% 0%
  Oman AFC 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0% 0%
  Palestine AFC 2 2 0 0 7 0 +7 100% 0%
  Paraguay CONMEBOL 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0% 0%
  Peru CONMEBOL 2 0 1 1 0 3 −3 0% 50%
  Poland UEFA 5 1 2 2 3 9 −6 20% 40%
  Portugal UEFA 3 2 0 1 4 2 +2 66.67% 33.33%
  Qatar AFC 2 1 1 0 1 0 +1 50% 0%
  Republic of Ireland UEFA 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 0% 100%
  Romania UEFA 2 1 0 1 3 5 −2 50% 50%
  Russia[B] UEFA 4 0 1 3 3 7 −4 0% 75%
  Rwanda CAF 4 2 1 1 7 4 +3 50% 25%
  São Tomé and Príncipe CAF 2 2 0 0 5 0 +5 100% 0%
  Saudi Arabia AFC 8 3 2 3 17 7 +10 37.5% 37.5%
  Scotland UEFA 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 100% 0%
  Senegal CAF 30 17 6 7 41 18 +23 56.67% 23.33%
  Serbia[C] UEFA 6 1 1 4 5 12 −7 16.67% 66.67%
  Sierra Leone CAF 8 7 1 0 17 1 +16 87.5% 0%
  Singapore AFC 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 100% 0%
  Slovakia UEFA 2 2 0 0 4 2 0 100% 0%
  Somalia CAF 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 100% 0%
  South Africa CAF 9 2 3 4 10 14 −4 22.22% 44.44%
  South Korea AFC 6 1 4 1 10 9 +1 16.67% 16.67%
  South Yemen AFC 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4 100% 0%
  Spain UEFA 4 0 2 2 4 6 −2 0% 50%
  Sudan CAF 7 3 4 0 9 3 0 42.86% 0%
   Switzerland UEFA 3 3 0 0 6 2 +4 100% 0%
  Syria AFC 3 3 0 0 6 0 +6 100% 0%
  Tanzania CAF 6 5 0 1 12 5 +7 83.33% 16.67%
  Thailand AFC 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 100% 0%
  Togo CAF 12 6 3 3 22 11 +11 50% 25%
  Trinidad and Tobago CONCACAF 3 3 0 0 4 0 +4 100% 0%
  Tunisia CAF 50 13 28 9 53 46 +7 26% 18%
  Uganda CAF 4 2 0 2 10 8 +2 50% 50%
  Ukraine UEFA 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0% 0%
  United Arab Emirates AFC 5 2 2 1 6 4 +2 40% 20%
  Uruguay CONMEBOL 2 0 0 2 0 2 −2 0% 100%
  United States CONCACAF 5 3 1 1 6 5 +1 60% 20%
  Uzbekistan AFC 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 100% 0%
  Yemen AFC 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4 100% 0%
  Zambia CAF 19 11 2 6 24 18 +6 57.89% 31.58%
  Zimbabwe CAF 5 3 2 0 6 2 +4 60% 0%
Total (117) All 672 322 % %
Notes
  1. ^ Includes   West Germany
  2. ^ Includes   Soviet Union
  3. ^ Includes   Yugoslavia

Honours edit

Awards edit

African National Team of the Year

  •   First place: 1985, 1986, 1997, 2023
  •   Second place: 1993, 1998, 2003, 2004
  •   Third place: 1980

FIFA Best Mover of the Year

  •   First place: 2022
  •   Third place: 1993

Orders and decorations edit

See also edit

Other football codes edit

Notes edit

References edit

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