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Football at the 2016 Summer Olympics

The association football tournament at the 2016 Summer Olympics was held from 3 to 20 August in Brazil.[1]

Football at the 2016 Summer Olympics
Football, Rio 2016.png
Tournament details
Host country  Brazil
Dates 3–20 August 2016
Teams 16 (men) + 12 (women) (from 6 confederations)
Venue(s) 7 (in 6 host cities)
Final positions
Champions  Brazil (men)
 Germany (women)
Runners-up  Germany (men)
 Sweden (women)
Third place  Nigeria (men)
 Canada (women)
Fourth place  Honduras (men)
 Brazil (women)
2012
2020

In addition to the Olympic host city of Rio de Janeiro, matches were played in Belo Horizonte, Brasília, Salvador, São Paulo, and Manaus. All six cities hosted matches during the 2014 World Cup, with the Estádio Olímpico João Havelange in Rio the only Olympic venue not to have been a World Cup venue.[2][3]

Associations affiliated with FIFA might send teams to participate in the tournament. Men's teams were restricted to under-23 players (born on or after 1 January 1993) with a maximum of three overage players allowed, while there were no age restrictions on women's teams.[4] The Games made use of about 400 footballs.[5]

Contents

Competition scheduleEdit

The match schedule of the men's and women's tournament was unveiled on 10 November 2015.[6][7]

GS Group stage QF Quarterfinals SF Semifinals B 3rd place play-off F Final
Date
Event
Wed 3 Thu 4 Fri 5 Sat 6 Sun 7 Mon 8 Tue 9 Wed 10 Thu 11 Fri 12 Sat 13 Sun 14 Mon 15 Tue 16 Wed 17 Thu 18 Fri 19 Sat 20
Men GS GS GS QF SF B F
Women GS GS GS QF SF B F

VenuesEdit

Rio de Janeiro hosted preliminary matches at the Estádio Olímpico João Havelange and the women's and men's final at the Maracanã Stadium on 19 and 20 August. Apart from Rio de Janeiro the five other cities were: São Paulo, Belo Horizonte, Brasília, Salvador, and Manaus, which were all host cities during the 2014 FIFA World Cup.[2] The final choice of venues was announced by FIFA on 16 March 2015.[3]

Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro Brasília, Distrito Federal São Paulo, São Paulo
Maracanã Estádio Olímpico Estádio Nacional Mané Garrincha Arena Corinthians

15°47′0.6″S 47°53′56.99″W / 15.783500°S 47.8991639°W / -15.783500; -47.8991639 (Estádio Nacional Mané Garrincha)

23°32′43.91″S 46°28′24.14″W / 23.5455306°S 46.4733722°W / -23.5455306; -46.4733722 (Arena Corinthians)

22°53′35.42″S 43°17′32.17″W / 22.8931722°S 43.2922694°W / -22.8931722; -43.2922694 (Estádio Olímpico João Havelange)

22°54′43.8″S 43°13′48.59″W / 22.912167°S 43.2301639°W / -22.912167; -43.2301639 (Estádio do Maracanã)

Capacity: 74,738[8]
Renovated for the 2014 World Cup
Capacity: 60,000
Renovated for the 2016 Olympics
Capacity: 69,349[8]
Renovated for the 2014 World Cup
Capacity: 48,234[8]
New stadium for the 2014 World Cup
       
Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais
Mineirão

19°51′57″S 43°58′15″W / 19.86583°S 43.97083°W / -19.86583; -43.97083 (Estádio Mineirão)

Capacity: 58,170[8]
Renovated for the 2014 World Cup
 
Salvador, Bahia
Itaipava Arena Fonte Nova

12°58′43″S 38°30′15″W / 12.97861°S 38.50417°W / -12.97861; -38.50417 (Arena Fonte Nova)

Capacity: 51,900[8]
New stadium for the 2014 World Cup
 
Manaus, Amazonas
Arena da Amazônia

3°4′59″S 60°1′41″W / 3.08306°S 60.02806°W / -3.08306; -60.02806 (Arena da Amazônia)

Capacity: 40,549[8]
New stadium for the 2014 World Cup
 

Training venuesEdit

Event stadium Training venue #1 Training venue #2 Training venue #3 Training venue #4
Maracanã CFZ Stadium Vasco Barra Football Club Juliano Moreira Sports Complex N/A
Estádio Nacional Mané Garrincha Cave Stadium Minas Brasília Tennis Club Yacht Club of Brasília Cruzeiro Stadium
Mineirão Toca da Raposa 1 Toca da Raposa 2 Cidade do Galo América F.C. Training Center
Itaipava Arena Fonte Nova Parque Santiago Stadium Pituaçu Stadium Barradão Stadium E.C. Bahia Training Center
Arena Corinthians São Paulo F.C. Training Center S.E. Palmeiras Training Center C.A. Juventus Stadium Nacional A.C. Stadium

QualificationEdit

Men's qualificationEdit

In addition to host nation Brazil, 15 men's national teams qualified from six separate continental confederations. FIFA ratified the distribution of spots at the Executive Committee meeting in March 2014.[9]

Means of qualification Dates1 Venue1 Berths Qualified
Host country 2 October 2009   Denmark 1   Brazil
2015 South American Youth Championship[10] 14 January – 7 February 2015   Uruguay 1   Argentina
2015 UEFA European Under-21 Championship[11] 17–30 June 2015   Czech Republic 4   Denmark
  Germany
  Portugal
  Sweden
2015 Pacific Games[12] 3–17 July 2015   Papua New Guinea 1   Fiji2
2015 CONCACAF Olympic Qualifying Championship[13] 1–13 October 2015   United States 2   Honduras
  Mexico
2015 Africa U-23 Cup of Nations[14] 28 November – 12 December 2015   Senegal 3   Algeria
  Nigeria
  South Africa
2016 AFC U-23 Championship[15] 12–30 January 2016   Qatar 3   Iraq
  Japan
  South Korea
2016 CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off 25–29 March 2016 Various (home and away)3 1   Colombia
Total 16
  • ^1 Dates and venues are those of final tournaments (or final round of qualification tournaments), various qualification stages may precede matches at these specific venues.
  • ^2 Nations making their Olympic tournament debut
  • ^3 One match each in Colombia and United States in a two-legged tie.

Women's qualificationEdit

In addition to host nation Brazil, 11 women's national teams qualified from six separate continental confederations. FIFA ratified the distribution of spots at the Executive Committee meeting in March 2014.[9] Most continents use specific Olympic qualifying tournaments to allocate their spots, but two use slightly different procedures.

CONMEBOL used the Copa América to determine its Olympic entrant. Because the Olympic host, Brazil, won the Copa América, the runner-up (Colombia) qualified for the Olympics.

UEFA generally uses the World Cup to determine its Olympic entrants. The top 3 finishers at the World Cup, excluding England, qualified. When multiple European teams were eliminated in the same round and this results in a tie for an Olympic qualifying spot, an Olympic Qualifying Tournament was used to break the tie. For these Games, Germany and France both reached at least the quarterfinals and thus obtained qualification spots (England also did so, but was ineligible for Olympic play). The next best finish for European teams was a four-way tie among the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and Switzerland, which each lost in the round of 16. Those four teams competed in a separate tournament to break that tie, won by Sweden.

Means of qualification Dates4 Venue4 Berths Qualified
Host country 2 October 2009   Denmark 1   Brazil
2014 Copa América[16] 11–28 September 2014   Ecuador 1   Colombia
2015 FIFA World Cup[17]
(for UEFA eligible teams)5
6 June – 5 July 2015   Canada 2   France
  Germany
2015 CAF Olympic Qualifying Tournament[14] 2–18 October 2015 Various (home and away) 2   South Africa
  Zimbabwe6
2016 OFC Olympic Qualifying Tournament[12] 23 January 2016   Papua New Guinea 1   New Zealand
2016 CONCACAF Olympic Qualifying Championship[18] 10–21 February 2016   United States 2   Canada
  United States
2016 AFC Olympic Qualifying Tournament[19] 29 February – 9 March 2016   Japan[20] 2   Australia
  China PR
2016 UEFA Olympic Qualifying Tournament[21] 2–9 March 2016   Netherlands 1   Sweden
Total 12
  • ^4 Dates and venues are those of final tournaments (or final round of qualification tournaments), various qualification stages may precede matches at these specific venues.
  • ^5 England finished in the top three among UEFA teams in the World Cup, however England is not an IOC member and talks for them to compete as Great Britain broke down.
  • ^6 Nations making their Olympic tournament debut

Men's competitionEdit

 
2016 Summer Olympic Games livery near Estádio Nacional Mané Garrincha, Brasília, venue for several men's and women's competitions.

The competition consisted of two stages; a group stage followed by a knockout stage.

Group stageEdit

Teams were divided into four groups of four countries, playing each team in their group once. Three points were awarded for a victory, one for a draw. The top two teams per group qualified for the quarterfinals.

Group AEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Brazil (H) 3 1 2 0 4 0 +4 5 Quarter-finals
2   Denmark 3 1 1 1 1 4 −3 4
3   Iraq 3 0 3 0 1 1 0 3
4   South Africa 3 0 2 1 1 2 −1 2
Source: Rio2016 & FIFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host.

Group BEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Nigeria 3 2 0 1 6 6 0 6 Quarter-finals
2   Colombia 3 1 2 0 6 4 +2 5
3   Japan 3 1 1 1 7 7 0 4
4   Sweden 3 0 1 2 2 4 −2 1
Source: Rio2016 & FIFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers

Group CEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   South Korea 3 2 1 0 12 3 +9 7 Quarter-finals
2   Germany 3 1 2 0 15 5 +10 5
3   Mexico 3 1 1 1 7 4 +3 4
4   Fiji 3 0 0 3 1 23 −22 0
Source: Rio2016 & FIFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers

Group DEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Portugal 3 2 1 0 5 2 +3 7 Quarter-finals
2   Honduras 3 1 1 1 5 5 0 4
3   Argentina 3 1 1 1 3 4 −1 4
4   Algeria 3 0 1 2 4 6 −2 1
Source: Rio2016 & FIFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers

Knockout stageEdit

 
Quarter-finals Semi-finals Gold medal match
 
                   
 
13 August — São Paulo
 
 
  Brazil 2
 
17 August — Rio de Janeiro
 
  Colombia 0
 
  Brazil 6
 
13 August — Belo Horizonte
 
  Honduras 0
 
  South Korea 0
 
20 August — Rio de Janeiro
 
  Honduras 1
 
  Brazil (p) 1 (5)
 
13 August — Salvador
 
  Germany 1 (4)
 
  Nigeria 2
 
17 August — São Paulo
 
  Denmark 0
 
  Nigeria 0
 
13 August — Brasília
 
  Germany 2 Bronze medal match
 
  Portugal 0
 
20 August — Belo Horizonte
 
  Germany 4
 
  Honduras 2
 
 
  Nigeria 3
 

Women's competitionEdit

The competition consisted of two stages; a group stage followed by a knockout stage.

Group stageEdit

Teams were divided into three groups of four countries, playing each team in their group once. Three points were awarded for a victory, one for a draw. The top two teams per group and best two third-placed teams qualified for the quarterfinals.

Group EEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Brazil (H) 3 2 1 0 8 1 +7 7 Quarter-finals
2   China PR 3 1 1 1 2 3 −1 4
3   Sweden 3 1 1 1 2 5 −3 4
4   South Africa 3 0 1 2 0 3 −3 1
Source: Rio2016 & FIFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host.

Group FEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Canada 3 3 0 0 7 2 +5 9 Quarter-finals
2   Germany 3 1 1 1 9 5 +4 4
3   Australia 3 1 1 1 8 5 +3 4
4   Zimbabwe 3 0 0 3 3 15 −12 0
Source: Rio2016 & FIFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers

Group GEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   United States 3 2 1 0 5 2 +3 7 Quarter-finals
2   France 3 2 0 1 7 1 +6 6
3   New Zealand 3 1 0 2 1 5 −4 3
4   Colombia 3 0 1 2 2 7 −5 1
Source: Rio2016 & FIFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers

Knockout stageEdit

 
Quarter-finals Semi-finals Gold medal match
 
                   
 
12 August — Belo Horizonte
 
 
  Brazil (p) 0 (7)
 
16 August — Rio de Janeiro (Mar.)
 
  Australia 0 (6)
 
  Brazil 0 (3)
 
12 August — Brasília
 
  Sweden (p) 0 (4)
 
  United States 1 (3)
 
19 August — Rio de Janeiro (Mar.)
 
  Sweden (p) 1 (4)
 
  Sweden 1
 
12 August — São Paulo
 
  Germany 2
 
  Canada 1
 
16 August — Belo Horizonte
 
  France 0
 
  Canada 0
 
12 August — Salvador
 
  Germany 2 Bronze medal match
 
  China PR 0
 
19 August — São Paulo
 
  Germany 1
 
  Brazil 1
 
 
  Canada 2
 

Medal summaryEdit

Medal tableEdit

Key   *   Host nation (Brazil)

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1   Germany 1 1 0 2
2   Brazil* 1 0 0 1
3   Sweden 0 1 0 1
4   Canada 0 0 1 1
  Nigeria 0 0 1 1
Total 5 NOCs 2 2 2 6

MedalistsEdit

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men
details
  Brazil (BRA)
Weverton
Zeca
Rodrigo Caio
Marquinhos
Renato Augusto
Douglas Santos
Luan
Rafinha
Gabriel
Neymar
Gabriel Jesus
Walace
William
Luan Garcia
Rodrigo Dourado
Thiago Maia
Felipe Anderson
Uilson
 
  Germany (GER)
Timo Horn
Jeremy Toljan
Lukas Klostermann
Matthias Ginter
Niklas Süle
Sven Bender
Max Meyer
Lars Bender
Davie Selke
Leon Goretzka
Julian Brandt
Jannik Huth
Philipp Max
Robert Bauer
Max Christiansen
Grischa Prömel
Serge Gnabry
Nils Petersen
Eric Oelschlägel
  Nigeria (NGR)
Daniel Akpeyi
Muenfuh Sincere
Kingsley Madu
Shehu Abdullahi
Saturday Erimuya
William Troost-Ekong
Aminu Umar
Oghenekaro Etebo
Imoh Ezekiel
John Obi Mikel
Junior Ajayi
Popoola Saliu
Umar Sadiq
Azubuike Okechukwu
Ndifreke Udo
Stanley Amuzie
Usman Mohammed
Emmanuel Daniel
 
Women
details
  Germany (GER)
Almuth Schult
Josephine Henning
Saskia Bartusiak
Leonie Maier
Annike Krahn
Simone Laudehr
Melanie Behringer
Lena Goeßling
Alexandra Popp
Dzsenifer Marozsán
Anja Mittag
Tabea Kemme
Sara Däbritz
Babett Peter
Mandy Islacker
Melanie Leupolz
Isabel Kerschowski
Laura Benkarth
Svenja Huth
  Sweden (SWE)
Jonna Andersson
Emilia Appelqvist
Kosovare Asllani
Emma Berglund
Stina Blackstenius
Hilda Carlén
Lisa Dahlkvist
Magdalena Ericsson
Nilla Fischer
Pauline Hammarlund
Sofia Jakobsson
Hedvig Lindahl
Fridolina Rolfö
Elin Rubensson
Jessica Samuelsson
Lotta Schelin
Caroline Seger
Linda Sembrant
Olivia Schough
  Canada (CAN)
Stephanie Labbé
Allysha Chapman
Kadeisha Buchanan
Shelina Zadorsky
Rebecca Quinn
Deanne Rose
Rhian Wilkinson
Diana Matheson
Josée Bélanger
Ashley Lawrence
Desiree Scott
Christine Sinclair
Sophie Schmidt
Melissa Tancredi
Nichelle Prince
Janine Beckie
Jessie Fleming
Sabrina D'Angelo
 

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Circular no. 1383 - Olympic Football Tournaments Rio 2016 - Men's and Women's Tournaments" (PDF). FIFA.com. 1 October 2013. Retrieved 2 October 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Manaus enters race to host Rio 2016 Olympic Games football matches". Rio 2016 official website. 12 February 2015. Archived from the original on 13 February 2015. 
  3. ^ a b "Olympic Football Tournaments to be played in six cities and seven stadiums". FIFA.com. 16 March 2015. 
  4. ^ "Regulations for the Olympic Football Tournaments 2016" (PDF). FIFA.com. 
  5. ^ "8,400 shuttlecocks, 250 golf carts, 54 boats... the mind-blowing numbers behind the Rio 2016 Games". Archived from the original on 7 July 2016. 
  6. ^ "Match schedule for Rio 2016 unveiled". FIFA.com. 10 November 2015. 
  7. ^ "Match Schedule Olympic Football Tournaments Rio 2016" (PDF). FIFA.com. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f "2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Venues". FIFA.com. 18 January 2012. Retrieved 12 June 2014. 
  9. ^ a b "FIFA ratifies the distribution of seats corresponding to each confederation". CONMEBOL.com. 4 April 2014. Retrieved 5 November 2014. 
  10. ^ "Reglamento – Campeonato Sudamericano Sub-20 Juventud de América 2015" (PDF). CONMEBOL.com. 
  11. ^ "Regulations of the UEFA European Under-21 Championship, 2013–15 competition" (PDF). UEFA. 
  12. ^ a b "OFC Insider Issue 6". Oceania Football Confederation. March 11, 2015. p. 8. 
  13. ^ "United States Named Host for CONCACAF Men’s Olympic Qualifying Championship 2015". CONCACAF.com. 12 February 2015. Retrieved 13 February 2015. 
  14. ^ a b "CAF Full Calendar". CAFonline.com. 28 February 2015. Archived from the original on 14 February 2015. Retrieved 28 February 2015. 
  15. ^ "Regulations AFC U-23 Championship 2016" (PDF). AFC. 
  16. ^ "Reglamento – Copa América Femenina 2014" (PDF) (in Spanish). CONMEBOL. 
  17. ^ "Germany and Norway drawn together". UEFA.com. 6 December 2014. 
  18. ^ "2016 CONCACAF Women’s Olympic Qualifying Championship Will be Played in Dallas and Houston". US Soccer. August 12, 2015. 
  19. ^ "Groups drawn for First Round of Rio 2016 Women's Qualifiers". Asian Football Confederation. 2014-12-04. Retrieved 2014-12-04. 
  20. ^ "Football - Women's AFC Olympic Qualifying Tournament". Australian Olympic Committee. Retrieved 28 July 2015. 
  21. ^ "European contenders impress in Canada". UEFA.com. 18 June 2015. 

External linksEdit