Dzsenifer Marozsán

Dzsenifer Marozsán (Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈd͡ʒɛnifɛr ˈmɒroʒaːn]; born 18 April 1992) is a professional footballer who plays as a midfielder for French club Olympique Lyonnais, as well as the German national team. She previously played for 1. FC Saarbrücken and 1. FFC Frankfurt in the German Frauen Bundesliga. Born in Hungary, she represents Germany at international level.[2]

Dzsenifer Marozsán
Dzsenifer Marozsán (croped).jpg
Marozsán in 2019
Personal information
Full name Dzsenifer Marozsán[1]
Date of birth (1992-04-18) 18 April 1992 (age 30)
Place of birth Budapest, Hungary
Height 1.71 m (5 ft 7 in)
Position(s) Midfielder
Club information
Current team
Olympique Lyonnais
Number 10
Youth career
1996–2003 DJK Burbach
2003–2007 1. FC Saarbrücken
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2007–2009 1. FC Saarbrücken 38 (13)
2009–2016 1. FFC Frankfurt 133 (40)
2016– Olympique Lyonnais 89 (37)
2021OL Reign (loan) 20 (0)
National team
2004–2007 Germany U15 12 (13)
2007–2008 Germany U17 21 (21)
2009–2012 Germany U19 12 (13)
2009–2012 Germany U20 17 (6)
2010– Germany 111 (33)
*Club domestic league appearances and goals, correct as of 22 April 2019
‡ National team caps and goals, correct as of 17:29, 12 April 2022 (UTC)

At the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Marozsán led unified Germany to its first-ever Olympic gold medal in football, four decades after the East German men won in 1976.[3] In 2015, her cross to Mandy Islacker in stoppage time resulted in a UEFA Women's Champions League win for 1. FFC Frankfurt.[3] She scored the game-winning goal during the UEFA Women's Euro 2013 semifinal against Sweden ultimately helping Germany win the title.[3]

Early lifeEdit

Born in Budapest, Hungary, Marozsán moved with her family to Germany in 1996, after her father János Marozsán, a four-time Hungarian football national, had signed a contract with 1. FC Saarbrücken. She began her career at DJK Burbach, where she played for a boys' team. She then joined the youth department of 1. FC Saarbrücken.[4] The DFB pushed for naturalizing her so she could play for Germany. In fact her whole family was naturalized, because she was still under-aged.[5]

Club careerEdit

1. FC Saarbrücken, 2007–2009Edit

In 2007 at the age of 14 years and 7 months, Marozsán became the youngest player to play in the German Bundesliga when she made her debut for 1. FC Saarbrücken. She also holds the record as the Bundesliga's youngest goal scorer at 15 years and 4 months.[6]

1. FFC Frankfurt, 2009–2016Edit

 
Marozsán playing for Frankfurt in 2012.

Marozsán signed with 1. FFC Frankfurt in 2009.[7] During her time with the club, Frankfurt managed two second-place finishes, coming in the 2010-2011 and 2013-2014 seasons.

She reached her first ever UWCL final in 2012, where Frankfurt were defeated 2–0 by her future club, Lyon. During the 2014–2015 season, she played and scored in each knockout round of the UWCL on the road to the final. In the final against PSG, she played all ninety minutes and sent in the assist to substitute Mandy Islacker that won them the match in extra time. With this win, she earned her first UWCL title and Frankfurt's fourth.[8] She ended up as top assister of the tournament with 8 assists[9][10] and was named to the team of the tournament by UEFA.[11]

In her final season with Frankfurt, they finished third in the Bundesliga table, disqualifying them from UWCL competition for the coming season.

Olympique Lyonnais, 2016–presentEdit

In July 2016, Marozsán signed with Olympique Lyonnais from 1. FFC Frankfurt.

International careerEdit

 
Marozsán in 2016

Marozsán made her debut for the senior national team on 28 October 2010 in a match against Australia.[12] Her first goal for the senior national team came on 15 February 2012 in a match against Turkey.[13]

In 2013, Germany coach Silvia Neid named her to the Germany squad for the 2013 UEFA Women's Euro competition. In the semifinal of the tournament, she scored a goal versus Sweden, a weak shot from outside the box that slowly found its way to the back of the net. The goal was enough to send them to the final against Norway, where she started the match behind striker Célia Okoyino da Mbabi. Germany won the final thanks to two Nadine Angerer penalty saves and a close-range Anja Mittag shot, giving Marozsán her first major international title. Marozsán was named to the UEFA team of the tournament for her performances throughout the competition.[14]

She scored the deciding goal in the 2016 Olympic Final, leading Germany to their first-ever women's football Olympic gold medal.[15]

She was named captain of the German team on 21 October 2016.[16]

On 22 September 2020, Marozsán played her 100th match for Germany in a 3–0 win against Montenegro during the UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying.[17]

Career statisticsEdit

InternationalEdit

As of 12 April 2022[18]
Germany
Year Apps Goals
2010 2 0
2011 1 0
2012 6 5
2013 20 9
2014 13 6
2015 12 6
2016 15 4
2017 12 2
2018 5 0
2019 11 0
2020 5 1
2021 7 0
2022 2 0
Total 111 33

International goalsEdit

Scores and results list Germany's goal tally first:[13]

Personal lifeEdit

Marozsán had pulmonary embolism in July 2018.[19] Three months later, she returned to playing football.[20]

HonoursEdit

1. FC SaarbrückenEdit

FFC FrankfurtEdit

Olympique LyonnaisEdit

GermanyEdit

IndividualEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019 – List of Players: Germany" (PDF). FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 10 June 2019. p. 10. Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 June 2019. Retrieved 10 July 2021.
  2. ^ BENCE, BABJÁK (21 September 2016). "Marozsán Dzsenifer: A szívem mindig magyar lesz – NSO". NSO.hu (in Hungarian). Retrieved 27 April 2017.
  3. ^ a b c McCauley, Kim (19 August 2016). "Dzsenifer Marozsán has cemented her place on top of women's soccer". SB Nation. Retrieved 20 April 2017.
  4. ^ "Interview mit Dzsenifer Marozsan" (in German). fansoccer.de. Retrieved 26 March 2011.
  5. ^ "Immer ihrer Zeit voraus" (in German). faz.net. 17 July 2017. Retrieved 23 July 2017.
  6. ^ "Dzsenifer Marozsan. – Fußball – ZDF.de Sport" (in German). ZDF. Archived from the original on 7 October 2011. Retrieved 26 March 2011.
  7. ^ Kennedy, Paul (14 May 2015). "Twenty for Canada 2015: Germany's Dzsenifer Marozsan". Soccer America. Retrieved 20 April 2017.
  8. ^ "Frankfurt-Paris - UEFA Women's Champion's League - UEFA.com". 14 May 2015. Retrieved 28 December 2019.
  9. ^ "Statistics — Qualifying phase — Player statistics — Assists". UEFA.com. Retrieved 28 December 2019.
  10. ^ "Statistics — Tournament phase — Player statistics — Assists". UEFA.com. Retrieved 28 December 2019.
  11. ^ "The UEFA technical team Squad of the Season". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 13 August 2015. Retrieved 28 December 2019.
  12. ^ "Players Info Marozsan Caps". DFB. Retrieved 3 February 2014.
  13. ^ a b "Players Info Marozsan Goals". DFB. Retrieved 3 February 2014.
  14. ^ "Germany No1 Angerer heads up all-star squad". 30 July 2013. Retrieved 28 December 2019.
  15. ^ "Gold for Germany as Neid finishes in style". fifa.com. 19 August 2016. Archived from the original on 20 August 2016.
  16. ^ "Marozsán neue Spielführerin der DFB-Frauen". dfb.de. 21 October 2016.
  17. ^ "3-0! Germany win in Marozsan's 100th international". dfb.de. 22 September 2020.
  18. ^ "Dzsenifer Marozsán". dfb.de. 18 September 2021.
  19. ^ "Dzsenifer Marozsan: Germany captain has blocked blood vessel in lung". BBC Sport. 18 July 2018.
  20. ^ "Dzsenifer Marozsan makes comeback after overcoming pulmonary embolism". dfb.de. 18 October 2018.
  21. ^ "Silver Ball 2008". fifa.com. Archived from the original on 25 October 2009.
  22. ^ "Golden Shoe 2008". fifa.com. Archived from the original on 25 October 2009.
  23. ^ "Golden Ball 2012". fifa.com. Archived from the original on 2 April 2016.
  24. ^ "IFFHS World's Women Best Playmaker". IFFHS. 29 December 2016. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  25. ^ a b "IFFHS WORLD AWARDS 2020 - THE WINNERS". IFFHS. 4 December 2020. Retrieved 4 December 2020.
  26. ^ "THE IFFHS WOMEN WORLD TEAM 2017". IFFHS. 12 December 2017. Retrieved 12 December 2017.
  27. ^ "IFFHS AWARDS – THE WOMEN WORLD TEAM 2018". IFFHS. 1 December 2018. Archived from the original on 15 May 2019. Retrieved 5 December 2018.
  28. ^ "IFFHS AWARDS 2019 – THE IFFHS WOMEN WORLD TEAM OF THE YEAR 2019". IFFHS. 30 November 2019. Archived from the original on 2 December 2019. Retrieved 30 November 2019.
  29. ^ "2016 FIFPro Award". fifpro.org. Archived from the original on 28 July 2017. Retrieved 9 March 2017.
  30. ^ "Trophées UNFP : Dzsenifer Marozsan et Marie-Antoinette Katoto récompensées". L'Équipe (in French). 13 May 2018. Retrieved 30 September 2018.
  31. ^ "Mbappé Wins Awards Double". www.ligue1.com. 19 May 2019. Retrieved 19 May 2019.
  32. ^ "Philipp Lahm ist Fußballer des Jahres 2016/2017" (in German). kicker.de. 23 July 2017. Retrieved 23 July 2017.
  33. ^ "Toni Kroos ist Fußballer des Jahres 2017/18". kicker.de (in German). 5 August 2018. Retrieved 5 August 2018.
  34. ^ "Dzsenifer Marozsan erneut Fußballerin des Jahres". kicker.de (in German). 28 July 2019. Retrieved 28 July 2019.
  35. ^ "Dzsenifer Marozsán named Women's Champions League Midfielder of the Season". UEFA. 1 October 2020.
  36. ^ "IFFHS WORLD'S BEST WOMAN PLAYMAKER OF THE DECADE 2011-2020 : DZSENIFER MAROZSAN". IFFHS. 8 January 2021.
  37. ^ "IFFHS BEST WOMAN PLAYER - UEFA - OF THE DECADE 2011-2020". IFFHS. 2 February 2021.
  38. ^ "IFFHS WORLD'S WOMAN TEAM OF THE DECADE 2011-2020". IFFHS. 25 January 2021.
  39. ^ "IFFHS WOMAN TEAM - UEFA - OF THE DECADE 2011-2020". IFFHS. 31 January 2021.

External linksEdit