New Zealand women's national football team

The New Zealand women's national football team, nicknamed the Football Ferns, is governed by New Zealand Football (NZF). The New Zealand national team qualified for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, held in China in September 2007, sending the team to their first World Cup in 16 years, and the second since their 1975 debut in international competition.[3] New Zealand will co-host the 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup alongside Australia, the Football Ferns automatically qualified as co-host.

New Zealand
Nickname(s)Football Ferns[1]
AssociationNew Zealand Football
ConfederationOFC (Oceania)
Head coachTom Sermanni
CaptainAli Riley
Most capsRia Percival (151)
Top scorerAmber Hearn (54)
FIFA codeNZL
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 22 Steady (16 April 2021)[2]
Highest16 (December 2013, July–September 2015)
Lowest24 (December 2006)
First international
 New Zealand 2–0 Hong Kong 
(Hong Kong; 25 August 1975)
Biggest win
 New Zealand 21–0 Samoa 
(Auckland, New Zealand; 9 October 1998)
Biggest defeat
 North Korea 11–0 New Zealand 
(Brisbane, Australia; 24 February 2004)
World Cup
Appearances6 (first in 1991)
Best resultGroup stage (1991, 2007, 2011, 2015, 2019)
OFC Women's Nations Cup
Appearances11 (first in 1983)
Best resultChampions (1983, 1991, 2007, 2010, 2014, 2018)
Summer Olympics
Appearances3 (first in 2008)
Best result8th (2012)

HistoryEdit

The New Zealand Women's Soccer Association was founded in 1975. By invitation the team took part in the Asian Women's Championship in 1975 and won the championship.[4] They have since then played in the Oceanic Championship. New Zealand will co-host the 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup along with Australia after being awarded on 25 June 2020 as the favorites over Colombia. The Football Ferns automatically qualified as co-host.

Team imageEdit

NicknamesEdit

The New Zealand women's national football team has been known or nicknamed as the "Football Ferns[5]".

Results and fixturesEdit

  • The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.
Legend

  Win   Draw   Lose   Void or Postponed   Fixture

2020Edit

11 April MS&AD Cup Japan   Cancelled   New Zealand Sendai, Japan
15:00 UTC+9 Cancellation Stadium: Yurtec Stadium

2021Edit

TBD Olympics GS New Zealand   v TBD TBD, Japan
Stadium: TBD
TBD Olympics GS New Zealand   v TBD TBD, Japan
Stadium: TBD
TBD Olympics GS New Zealand   v TBD TBD, Japan
Stadium: TBD

Coaching staffEdit

Current coaching staffEdit

Position Name Ref.
Head coach   Tom Sermanni

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

  • The following players were called up to compete at the 2020 Algarve Cup announced on 27 February 2020.[6]
  • Caps and goals are current as of 10 March 2020 after match against   Norway.
  • Following the first match of the tournament, Sarah Gregorius retired having made 100 appearances for the team.[7]
No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Erin Nayler (1992-04-17) 17 April 1992 (age 28) 69 0   Reading
21 1GK Victoria Esson (1991-03-06) 6 March 1991 (age 30) 3 0   Avaldsnes
23 1GK Anna Leat (2001-06-26) 26 June 2001 (age 19) 4 0   Georgetown Hoyas

4 2DF C. J. Bott (1995-04-22) 22 April 1995 (age 25) 22 1   Vålerenga
5 2DF Meikayla Moore (1996-06-04) 4 June 1996 (age 24) 38 3   MSV Duisburg
6 2DF Rebekah Stott (1993-06-17) 17 June 1993 (age 27) 79 4   Melbourne City
7 2DF Ali Riley (C) (1987-10-30) 30 October 1987 (age 33) 132 1   Orlando Pride
15 2DF Nicole Stratford (1989-02-01) 1 February 1989 (age 32) 3 0   USV Jena
18 2DF Stephanie Skilton (1994-10-27) 27 October 1994 (age 26) 10 0   Auckland Football
24 2DF Claudia Bunge (1999-09-21) 21 September 1999 (age 21) 4 0   Northern Lights
26 2DF Marisa van der Meer (1999-01-09) 9 January 1999 (age 22) 0 0   Canterbury United Pride

2 3MF Ria Percival (1989-12-07) 7 December 1989 (age 31) 148 14   Tottenham Hotspur
10 3MF Annalie Longo (1991-07-01) 1 July 1991 (age 29) 122 15   Melbourne Victory
12 3MF Betsy Hassett (1990-08-04) 4 August 1990 (age 30) 118 13   Stjarnan
14 3MF Katie Bowen (1994-04-15) 15 April 1994 (age 27) 68 3   Utah Royals
16 3MF Jana Radosavljević (1996-11-04) 4 November 1996 (age 24) 3 0   Werder Bremen
20 3MF Daisy Cleverley (1997-04-30) 30 April 1997 (age 23) 9 2   California Golden Bears
22 3MF Olivia Chance (1993-10-05) 5 October 1993 (age 27) 19 1   Bristol City

9 4FW Katie Rood (1992-09-02) 2 September 1992 (age 28) 11 5   Lewes
11 4FW Sarah Gregorius RET (1987-08-06) 6 August 1987 (age 33) 100 34 Retired
13 4FW Rosie White (1993-06-06) 6 June 1993 (age 27) 108 24   OL Reign
17 4FW Hannah Wilkinson (1992-05-28) 28 May 1992 (age 28) 95 26   Djurgårdens IF
19 4FW Paige Satchell (1998-04-13) 13 April 1998 (age 23) 17 1   SC Sand
25 4FW Michaela Robertson 0 0   Wellington United

Recent call-upsEdit

  • The following players have been named to a roster in the previous 12 months.

This list may be incomplete, and caps and goals may be inaccurate.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up


Notes:

  • INJ = Withdrew due to injury
  • PRE = Preliminary squad
  • RET = Retired from international duty

CaptainsEdit

RecordsEdit

Bold players are still active.

Statistics as of 10 March 2020.[8]

HonoursEdit

ContinentalEdit

  Champions: 1983, 1991, 2007, 2010, 2014, 2018
  Runners-up: 1989, 1994, 1998, 2003

Competitive recordEdit

FIFA Women's World CupEdit

FIFA Women's World Cup record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1991 Group stage 11th 3 0 0 3 1 11
  1995 Did not qualify
  1999
  2003
  2007 Group stage 14th 3 0 0 3 0 9
  2011 Group stage 12th 3 0 1 2 4 6
  2015 Group stage 19th 3 0 2 1 2 3
  2019 Group stage 20th 3 0 0 3 1 5
    2023 Qualified as co-hosts
Total Group stage 15 0 3 12 8 34
FIFA Women's World Cup history
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
  1991 Group stage 17 November   Denmark L 0–3 Tianhe Stadium, Guangzhou
19 November   Norway L 0–4 Guangdong Provincial Stadium, Guangzhou
21 November   China PR L 1–4 New Plaza Stadium, Foshan
  2007 Group stage 12 September   Brazil L 0–5 Wuhan Stadium, Wuhan
15 September   Denmark L 0–2
20 September   China PR L 0–2 Tianjin Olympic Centre Stadium, Tianjin
  2011 Group stage 27 June   Japan L 1–2 Ruhrstadion, Bochum
1 July   England L 1–2 Rudolf-Harbig-Stadion, Dresden
5 July   Mexico D 2–2 Rhein-Neckar-Arena, Sinsheim
  2015 Group stage 6 June   Netherlands L 0–1 Commonwealth Stadium, Edmonton
11 June   Canada D 0–0
15 June   China PR D 2–2 Winnipeg Stadium, Winnipeg
  2019 Group stage 11 June   Netherlands L 0–1 Stade Océane, Le Havre
15 June   Canada L 0–2 Stade des Alpes, Grenoble
20 June   Cameroon L 1–2 Stade de la Mosson, Montpellier
   
2023
Group stage July TBD TBD
July TBD TBD
July TBD TBD

Olympic GamesEdit

Summer Olympics record
Year Round Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
  1996 Did not qualify
  2000
  2004 Did not enter
  2008 Group Stage 3 0 1 2 2 7 −5 1
  2012 Quarter-finals 4 1 0 3 3 5 −2 3
  2016 Group Stage 3 1 0 2 1 5 −4 3
  2020 Qualified
Total 10 2 1 7 6 17 −11 7

OFC Women's Nations CupEdit

OFC Women's Nations Cup record
Year Result Pld W D L GF GA GD
  1983 1st 4 3 1 0 24 3 +21
  1986 3rd 4 2 0 2 3 3 0
  1989 2nd 5 4 0 1 10 1 +9
  1991 1st 4 3 0 1 28 1 +27
  1994 2nd 4 3 0 1 10 2 +8
  1998 2nd 4 3 0 1 41 3 +38
  2003 2nd 4 3 0 1 29 2 +27
  2007 1st 3 3 0 0 21 1 +20
  2010 1st 5 5 0 0 50 0 +50
  2014 1st 3 3 0 0 30 0 +30
  2018 1st 5 5 0 0 43 0 +43
Total 6 Titles 45 37 1 7 289 16 +273

Algarve CupEdit

The Algarve Cup is an invitational tournament for national teams in women's association football hosted by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). Held annually in the Algarve region of Portugal since 1994, it is one of the most prestigious and longest-running women's international football events and has been nicknamed the "Mini FIFA Women's World Cup".[9]

  Algarve Cup record
Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA GD
2016 4th place 4 1 2 1 2 2 0
2020 4th place 3 0 1 2 2 6 −4
Total 2/27 7 1 3 3 4 8 −4

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Soccer women step out with new name – Football Ferns..." Stuff.co.nz. 4 September 2007. Retrieved 22 October 2012.
  2. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 16 April 2021. Retrieved 16 April 2021.
  3. ^ "1975 ASIAN CUP". New Zealand Football on NZfootball.co.nz. Archived from the original on 2 September 2007. Retrieved 5 December 2008.
  4. ^ "1975". RSSSF. Retrieved 11 April 2019.
  5. ^ "Soccer women step out with new name – Football Ferns..." Stuff.co.nz. 4 September 2007. Retrieved 22 October 2012.
  6. ^ Voerman, Andrew (27 February 2020). "Abby Erceg remains unavailable as Football Ferns name squad for Algarve Cup". Stuff.co.nz.
  7. ^ Voerman, Andrew (5 March 2020). "Sarah Gregorius one of the lucky ones as she retires after her 100th Football Ferns match". Stuff.co.nz.
  8. ^ "Roll of Honour". The Ultimate New Zealand Soccer Website. Retrieved 10 November 2019.
  9. ^ "Women's game thriving in the Algarve". FIFA. 9 March 2011. Retrieved 13 March 2014.

External linksEdit

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Inaugural Champions
OFC Women's Champions
1983 (First title)
Succeeded by
1986 Chinese Taipei  
Preceded by
1989 Chinese Taipei  
OFC Women's Champions
1991 (Second title)
Succeeded by
1995 Australia  
Preceded by
2003 Australia  
OFC Women's Champions
2007 (Third title)
2010 (Fourth title)
2014 (Fifth title)
2018 (Sixth title)
Succeeded by
Incumbents
Preceded by
Inaugural Champions
AFC Women's Champions
1975 (First title)
Succeeded by
1977 Republic of China