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Mexico women's national football team

The Mexico women's national football team represents Mexico on the international stage. The squad is governed by the Mexican Football Federation and competes within CONCACAF, the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football. Holding gold medals in the Central American and Caribbean Games and a silver medal in the Pan American Games, La Tri's senior squad is currently ranked 27 Decrease 1 (12 July 2019)[1]. The team also boasts one silver and one bronze in the Women's World Cup, though these accomplishments are not officially recognized, as they took place prior to FIFA's recognition of the women's game. When it placed second in 1971, Mexico hosted the second edition of this unofficial tournament. In addition to its senior team, Mexico fields U-20 and U-17 squads as well, with the latter having reached the final during the 2018 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup.

Mexico women's national football team
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)
El Tri Femenil
La Tri
AssociationFederación Mexicana de Fútbol
ConfederationCONCACAF (North America, Central America and the Caribbean)
Sub-confederationNAFU (North America)
Head coachChristopher Cuéllar
CaptainMónica Ocampo
Most capsMaribel Dominguez (112)
Top scorerMaribel Domínguez (80)
FIFA codeMEX
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 27 Decrease 1 (12 July 2019)[1]
Highest21 (January 2011)
Lowest31 (December 2002)
First international
 Mexico 9–0 Austria 
(Jesolo, Italy; 6 July 1970)
Biggest win
 Mexico 10–0 Malta 
(Bristol, England; 28 June 1997)
 Martinique 0–10 Mexico
(Bridgeview, United States; 18 October 2014)
Biggest defeat
 United States 12–0 Mexico 
(Port-au-Prince, Haiti; 18 April 1991)
World Cup
Appearances3 (first in 1999)
Best resultGroup Stage (1999, 2011, 2015)
CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup
Appearances7 (first in 1991)
Best resultRunners-up Silver medal icon.svg : (1998), (2010)

Coached by Leonardo Cuéllar for most of the team's official existence, La Tri's senior squad has participated in three Women's World Cups and one edition of the Summer Olympic Games.

The senior squad was established in 1963, but its first FIFA-recognized game was in 1991.

Contents

HistoryEdit

Unofficial EraEdit

Although not officially recognized by FIFA until 1991, Mexico's team was actually established in 1963, when many countries still had bans on women's football.[2]. In the 1950s, both Costa Rica and Argentina witnessed increased interest in the women's game and held tours in various countries. In 1963, Las Ticas, the Costa Rican women's national football team, spent six months in Mexico conducting a tour to increase exposure of the game. Observing the success of Las Ticas, Mexico formed its first team to play in opposition to the Costa Rican squad.

Led by Alicia Vargas, Mexico placed third in the 1970 Women's World Cup, a tournament FIFA has yet to acknowledge. Mexico fell 2-1 in the semifinal to hosts Italy before defeating England 3-2 in the third place match. The following year, Mexico hosted the 1971 Women's World Cup, which has also yet to be officially recognized. The squad reached the final but fell 3-0 to Denmark. An estimated 110,000 people attended the final at Estadio Azteca[3], which is the largest crowd ever to witness a women's soccer game; FIFA has not recognized this attendance record either.

Modern EraEdit

In the 1980s, when a series of mundialitos took place, Mexico participated in the 1986 edition.[4] Mexico was placed in Group A along with Italy and Japan, but the team did not advance beyond the first stage.

Mexico's first official appearance in the Women's World Cup was in 1999, when the United States hosted the tournament. The team also qualified in 2011 and 2015, hosted by Germany and Canada, respectively. Likewise, the team qualified for the Olympics in 2004. In all four instances, El Tri Femenil failed to advance beyond the group stage; in fact, the team has yet to win a single game in either major tournament.

The first official coach for the Mexico women's national football team was Leonardo Cuéllar. One of his first objectives was to qualify for the 1999 Women's World Cup.[5] The team accomplished this by placing second to Canada in the 1998 CONCACAF Women's Championship. However, much controversy arose regarding the nationalities of the recruited players. Preference was given to US-born players of Mexican heritage, largely because Mexico did not have an official league at the time. Andrea Rodebaugh, the team's then-captain, argued that the team's main goal was to qualify; she also wanted to strengthen the team and celebrate its official recognition.[6] Despite the controversy, the team went on to participate in the 1999 Women's World Cup with a mix of US-born and Mexican-born players.

In recent years, an increase in young talent developing in Mexico brought an increase of expectations from Mexican football fans and media alike. Following their worst ever World Cup finish in 2015, fans began calling for Cuellar's resignation or firing. In 2016, the women's national football team failed to qualify for the Olympics, and lost to Costa Rica which was the turning point in the teams history since many thought the defeat resulted in Mexico becoming the fourth best team in CONCACAF. With these results and Leonardo Cuellar's controversial decision to not bring Charlyn Corral and Kenti Robles, whom had terrific seasons at their clubs in Spain's Primera División, onto the squad[7] led to him resigning from his position in April 2016.[8] Roberto Medina became the head coach in 2017.[9]

In 2018 Mexico won the Central American and Caribbean Games by defeating Costa Rica 3-1 in the final.[10]

At the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship Mexico entered as the third highest ranked team behind the United States and Canada. At the tournament Mexico finished third in their group with a record of one win and two losses, which included a surprising 2-0 loss to Panama. As a result of not advancing to the knockout round, Mexico was unable to qualify for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France.[11]

Notable MatchesEdit

Mexico's first recorded international game was against Austria during the 1970 Women's World Cup, when squad beat the European side 9-0 in the group stage. However, to participate in this inaugural tournament, teams had to qualify, so La Tri played against other teams prior to this match.

Before the modern era, Mexico defeated England 2-1 in the third place match of the 1970 Women's World Cup, the first edition of the tournament. In front of a record-breaking crowd, the team also reached the final of the 1971 Women's World Cup, but fell 3-0 to Denmark.

Among the most notable victories is when the team finished second in the 2010 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup. Hosts of the cup, Mexico defeated the United States in the semifinal for the first and only time before falling to Canada in the final.

Recent resultsEdit

2018Edit

2019Edit

PlayersEdit

Notable PlayersEdit

Club-Level AccomplishmentsEdit

Liga MX Femenil is Mexico's professional women's league, which was established in 2017 to strengthen the women's national team. Though many players come from this domestic league, others play in the National Women's Soccer League, the NCAA, the Icelandic Women's Premier League, and La Liga Iberdrola, among others.

The following players have received accolades with and/or for their respective clubs:

1. Iceland

A. Þór/KA: 2017 Season Champions
i. Stephany Mayor: 2017 Top Goal Scorer & 2017 Championship Team
ii. Bianca Sierra: 2017 Championship Team

2. Mexico

A. América: Apertura 2018 Champions
i. Cecilia Santiago: Apertura 2018 Championship Team
ii. Lucero Cuevas: Apertura 2017 & Clausura 2018 Top Goal Scorer and Apertura 2018 Championship Team
B. Chivas: Apertura 2017 Champions
i. Tania Morales: Apertura 2017 Championship Team
C. Pachuca: 2017 Copa Mexico Champions
i. Monica Ocampo: 2017 Copa Mexico Championship Team
D. Tigres: Clausura 2018 & Clausura 2019 Champions
i. Belén Cruz: Clausura 2018 & Clausura 2019 Championship Team
ii. Greta Espinoza: Clausura 2019 Championship Team
iii. Cristina Ferral: Clausura 2019 Championship Team
iv. Carolina Jaramillo: Clausura 2018 & Clausura 2019 Championship Team
v. Katty Martinez: Clausura 2018 & Clausura 2019 Championship Team
vi. Lizbeth Ovalle: Clausura 2018 & Clausura 2019 Championship Team
vii. Nayeli Rangel: Clausura 2018 & Clausura 2019 Championship Team

3. Spain

A. Atlético Madrid: 2017, 2018, and 2019 Season Champions
i. Kenti Robles: 2017, 2018, and 2019 Championship Team
B. Barcelona: 2012, 2013, and 2014 Season Champions
i. Kenti Robles: 2012, 2013, and 2014 Championship Team

4. United States

A. FC Kansas City: 2014 Season Champions
i. Renae Cuéllar: First ever goal scored in the NWSL
ii. Cecilia Santiago: 2014 Championship Team
B. Stanford Cardinal: 2011 NCAA Champions
i. Alina Garciamendez: 2011 NCAA Championship Team
C. USC Trojans: 2017 NCAA Champions
i. Katie Johnson: 2017 College Cup Most Outstanding Offensive Player & 2017 NCAA Championship Team

Current squadEdit

The following players were called-up for the 2019 Pan American Games.[18]

Caps and goals as 26 May 2019, after the match against the   United States.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Cecilia Santiago (1994-10-19) 19 October 1994 (age 24) 59 0   PSV Eindhoven
12 1GK Emily Alvarado (1998-06-09) 9 June 1998 (age 21) 1 0   TCU Horned Frogs

2 2DF Kenti Robles (1991-02-15) 15 February 1991 (age 28) 65 3   Atlético Madrid
3 2DF Bianca Sierra (1992-06-25) 25 June 1992 (age 27) 47 0   Þór/KA
4 2DF Rebeca Bernal (1997-08-31) 31 August 1997 (age 21) 14 0   Monterrey
5 2DF Jimena López (1999-01-30) 30 January 1999 (age 20) 8 0   Texas A&M Aggies
13 2DF Arianna Romero (1992-07-29) 29 July 1992 (age 26) 42 1   Houston Dash
15 2DF Andrea Sánchez (1994-03-31) 31 March 1994 (age 25) 3 0   Guadalajara

6 3MF Liliana Mercado (1988-10-22) 22 October 1988 (age 30) 13 0   UANL
8 3MF Joana Robles (1994-07-26) 26 July 1994 (age 24) 8 0   Atlas
10 3MF Stephany Mayor (1991-09-23) 23 September 1991 (age 27) 71 11   Þór/KA
11 3MF Lizbeth Ovalle (1999-10-19) 19 October 1999 (age 19) 10 2   UANL
16 3MF Nancy Antonio (1996-04-02) 2 April 1996 (age 23) 12 1   UANL
17 3MF María Sánchez (1996-02-20) 20 February 1996 (age 23) 15 3   Chicago Red Stars

7 4FW Daniela Espinosa (1999-07-13) 13 July 1999 (age 20) 6 0   América
9 4FW Charlyn Corral (1991-09-11) 11 September 1991 (age 27) 50 28   Atlético Madrid
14 4FW Katty Martínez (1998-03-14) 14 March 1998 (age 21) 6 0   UANL
18 4FW Kiana Palacios (1996-10-01) 1 October 1996 (age 22) 11 1   Real Sociedad

Recent call-upsEdit

These players were called up to the squad in the last 12 months:

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Alejandría Godínez (1994-02-24) 24 February 1994 (age 25) 2 0   Pachuca v.   Netherlands, 5 April 2019
GK Itzel González (1994-08-14) 14 August 1994 (age 24) 0 0   Tijuana training sessions from 14–22 January 2019
GK Bianca Henninger (1990-10-22) 22 October 1990 (age 28) 7 0   Houston Dash 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship
GK Pamela Tajonar (1984-12-02) 2 December 1984 (age 34) 39 0   Barcelona 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO

DF Jocelyn Orejel (1996-11-14) 14 November 1996 (age 22) 7 0   CSFA Ambilly [fr] v.   United States, 26 May 2019
DF Karen Díaz (1998-08-02) 2 August 1998 (age 20) 2 0   Pachuca v.   United States, 26 May 2019
DF Kimberly Rodríguez (1999-03-26) 26 March 1999 (age 20) 3 0   Oklahoma State Cowgirls 2019 Cyprus Women's Cup
DF Dirce Delgado (1986-08-29) 29 August 1986 (age 32) 0 0   UNAM training sessions from 14–22 January 2019
DF Christina Murillo (1993-01-28) 28 January 1993 (age 26) 40 1 Unattached 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship
DF Mónica Flores (1996-01-31) 31 January 1996 (age 23) 9 0   Valencia 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship
DF Annia Mejía (1996-03-12) 12 March 1996 (age 23) 4 0   Monterrey 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE
DF Greta Espinoza (1995-06-05) 5 June 1995 (age 24) 21 0   UANL 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO
DF Vanessa Flores (1997-05-26) 26 May 1997 (age 22) 2 0   UANL 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO
DF Clarissa Robles (1994-05-09) 9 May 1994 (age 25) 2 0   LA Galaxy OC 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO
DF Mariel Gutiérrez (1994-08-06) 6 August 1994 (age 24) 0 0 Unattached 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO
DF Marcela Valera (1987-04-12) 12 April 1987 (age 32) 1 0   América v.   France, 1 September 2018

MF Dinora Garza (1988-01-24) 24 January 1988 (age 31) 30 5   Monterrey v.   United States, 26 May 2019
MF Karla Nieto (1995-01-09) 9 January 1995 (age 24) 21 0   Pachuca v.   United States, 26 May 2019
MF Yamilé Franco (1992-07-07) 7 July 1992 (age 27) 9 1   León v.   United States, 26 May 2019
MF Alexia Delgado (1999-12-09) 9 December 1999 (age 19) 5 0   Arizona State Sun Devils v.   United States, 26 May 2019
MF Belén Cruz (1998-11-07) 7 November 1998 (age 20) 3 0   UANL v.   United States, 26 May 2019
MF Zulma Hernández (1995-09-09) 9 September 1995 (age 23) 3 0   América v.   United States, 26 May 2019
MF Cristina Ferral (1993-02-16) 16 February 1993 (age 26) 11 1   UANL v.   Netherlands, 5 April 2019
MF Mónica Ocampo (1987-01-04) 4 January 1987 (age 32) 91 17   Pachuca v.   Netherlands, 5 April 2019 INJ
MF Nayeli Rangel (1992-02-28) 28 February 1992 (age 27) 85 7   UANL 2019 Cyprus Women's Cup
MF Carolina Jaramillo (1994-03-19) 19 March 1994 (age 25) 4 0   UANL 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE
MF Tania Morales (1986-12-22) 22 December 1986 (age 32) 7 2   Guadalajara 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO
MF Natalia Gómez Junco (1992-10-09) 9 October 1992 (age 26) 6 0   UANL 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO
MF Esmeralda Verdugo (1994-01-19) 19 January 1994 (age 25) 2 0   América 2018 Central American and Caribbean Games

FW Adriana Iturbide (1993-03-27) 27 March 1993 (age 26) 3 1   Atlas v.   Netherlands, 5 April 2019
FW Desirée Monsiváis (1988-01-19) 19 January 1988 (age 31) 5 3   Monterrey training sessions from 14–22 January 2019
FW Betzy Cuevas (1997-04-21) 21 April 1997 (age 22) 0 0   Tijuana training sessions from 14–22 January 2019
FW Katie Johnson (1994-09-14) 14 September 1994 (age 24) 21 8   Chicago Red Stars 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship
FW Ariana Calderón (1990-05-12) 12 May 1990 (age 29) 14 2   Houston Dash 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship
FW Anisa Guajardo (1991-03-10) 10 March 1991 (age 28) 4 0 Unattached 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO
FW Daniela Solís (1996-10-01) 1 October 1996 (age 22) 0 0   Monterrey 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO

Notes:

  • PRE: Preliminary squad
  • PRO: Provisional roster

Competitive recordEdit

FIFA Women's World CupEdit

FIFA Women's World Cup Record
Year Round Position MP W D* L GF GA
  1991 Did not qualify
  1995
  1999 Group Stage 16th 3 0 0 3 1 15
  2003 Did not qualify
  2007
  2011 Group Stage 11th 3 0 2 1 3 7
  2015 Group Stage 22nd 3 0 1 2 2 8
  2019 Did not qualify
Total 3/8 9 0 3 6 6 30
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
FIFA Women's World Cup history
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
  1999 Group stage 19 June   Brazil L 1–7 Giants Stadium, East Rutherford
24 June   Germany L 0–6 Civic Stadium, Portland
27 June   Italy L 0–2 Foxboro Stadium, Foxborough
  2011 Group stage 27 June   England D 1–1 Volkswagen-Arena, Wolfsburg
1 July   Japan L 0–4 BayArena, Leverkusen
5 July   New Zealand D 2–2 Rhein-Neckar-Arena, Sinsheim
  2015 Group stage 9 June   Colombia D 1–1 Moncton Stadium, Moncton
13 June   England L 1–2
17 June   France L 0–5 TD Place, Ottawa

CONCACAF Women's ChampionshipEdit

CONCACAF Women's Championship Record
Year Round MP W D* L GF GA
  1991 Group Stage 3 1 0 2 9 16
  1993 Did not enter
  1994 Third Place 4 1 1 2 6 19
  1998 Runners-up 5 3 1 1 20 6
  2000 Group Stage 3 1 0 2 10 7
   2002 Third Place 5 3 0 2 11 7
  2006 Third Place 3 2 0 1 6 2
  2010 Runners-up 5 3 0 2 11 7
  2014 Third Place 5 3 0 2 17 7
  2018 Group Stage 3 1 0 2 4 9
Total - 36 18 2 16 94 80
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Olympic GamesEdit

Summer Olympic Games Record
Year Round Position MP W D* L GF GA
  1996 Did not qualify
  2000
  2004 Quarter-Finals 8th 3 0 1 2 1 8
  2008 Did not qualify
  2012
  2016
  2020 To be determined
  2024
  2028
Total - 1/6 3 0 1 2 1 8
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Pan American GamesEdit

Pan American Games Record
Year Round Position MP W D* L GF GA
  1999 Runners-up 2nd 6 3 1 2 15 9
  2003 Third Place 3rd 4 3 0 1 10 5
  2007 Fourth Place 4th 5 3 0 2 6 1
  2011 Third Place 3rd 5 2 2 1 3 2
  2015 Third Place 3rd 5 3 0 2 10 7
  2019 To be determined
  2023
Total - 5/5 25 14 3 8 54 24
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Central American and Caribbean GamesEdit

Central American and Caribbean Games Record
Year Round Position MP W D* L GF GA
  2010 Withdrew
  2014 Champions 1st 5 4 1 0 11 1
  2018 Champions 1st 5 5 0 0 18 3
  2022 To be determined
Total - 2/3 10 9 1 0 29 4
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Overall official recordEdit

Competition Stage Result Opponent Position Scorers
  1991 CONCACAF Tournament Group stage 0–12   United States
1–3   Trinidad and Tobago
8–1   Martinique 3 / 4
  1994 CONCACAF Tournament Group stage 0–9   United States
0–6   Canada
3–1   Jamaica
3–3   Trinidad and Tobago 3 / 5
  1998 CONCACAF Tournament Group stage 3–2   Costa Rica
7–1   Haiti
2–2   Trinidad and Tobago 1 / 4
Semifinals 8–0   Guatemala
Final 0–1   Canada
  1999 World Cup Group stage 1–7   Brazil Domínguez
0–6   Germany
0–2   Italy 4 / 4
  1999 Pan American Games Group stage 1–1   United States
2–3   Canada
5–1   Costa Rica
5–1   Trinidad and Tobago 3 / 5
Semifinals 2–2 (PSO: 5–3)   Canada
Final 0–1   United States
  2000 Gold Cup Group stage 3–4   Canada Domínguez 2, Mora
7–0   Guatemala Mora 4, Domínguez 3
0–3   China 3 / 4
  2002 Gold Cup Group stage 0–3   United States
5–1   Panama Gómez 2, Domínguez, Leyva, Sandoval
2–0   Trinidad and Tobago 2 / 4 Gerardo 2
Semifinals 0–2   Canada
Third place match 4–1   Costa Rica Domínguez 2, González, Mora
  2003 Pan American Games Group stage 1–0   Costa Rica Worbis
3–1   Argentina Mora, Rosales, Worbis
Semifinals 2–3   Canada Leyva, Mora
Third place match 4–1   Argentina Leyva, Mora, Moreno, Rosales
  2004 Summer Olympics Group stage 1–1   China Domínguez
0–2   Germany 2 / 3
Quarterfinals 0–5   Brazil
  2006 Gold Cup Group stage 3–0   Trinidad and Tobago Domínguez, González, P. Pérez
Semifinals 0–2   United States
Third place match 3–0   Jamaica Ocampo 2, Domínguez
2007 World Cup qualification AFC-CONCACAF play-off 0–2 2–1   Japan Domínguez, Leyva
  2007 Pan American Games Group stage 5–0   Paraguay Corral 2, Ocampo 2, Valdez
0–1   Argentina
2–0   Panama Worbis
3–2   United States López 2, Worbis
Semifinals 0–2   Brazil
Third place match 1–2   Canada Worbis
  2008 Summer Olympics qualification Group stage 8–1   Jamaica López 4, Morales 2, Ocampo, Worbis
1–3   United States 2 / 3 Worbis
Semifinals 0–1   Canada
  2010 Gold Cup Group stage 7–2   Guyana Domínguez 4, Garza, Worbis
2–0   Trinidad and Tobago Domínguez, López
0–3   Canada 2 / 4
Semifinals 2–1   United States Domínguez, V. Pérez
Final 0–1   Canada
  2011 World Cup Group stage 1–1   England Ocampo
0–4   Japan
2–2   New Zealand 3 / 4 Domínguez, Mayor
  2011 Pan American Games Group stage 0–0   Chile
1–1   Trinidad and Tobago Domínguez
1–0   Colombia 2 / 4 V. Pérez
Semifinals 0–1   Brazil
Third place match 1–0   Colombia Ruiz
  2012 Summer Olympics qualification' Group stage 5–0   Guatemala Domínguez 3, Diaz, Garza
7–0   Dominican Republic Guajardo 3, Diaz, Ruiz, Saucedo
0–4   United States 2 / 4
Semifinals 1–3   Canada V. Pérez
  2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship Group stage 0-1   Costa Rica
10–0   Martinique Samarzich, Duarte 2, Mayor, Guillou (o.g.), Garciamendez, Garza, Ocampo 2, Noyola
3-1   Jamaica 2 / 4 Mayor, Corral 2
Semifinals 0-3   United States
Third Place Match 4-2   Trinidad and Tobago Mayor, Ocampo, Corral 2
  2015 World Cup Group stage 1–1   Colombia V. Pérez
1–2   England Ibarra
0-5   France 4 / 4
  2015 Pan American Games Group stage 0–1   Colombia
3–1   Argentina Noyola, Rangel, Ruiz
3-1   Trinidad and Tobago 2 / 4 Mayor 2, Ocampo
Semifinals 2-4   Brazil Romero, Rangel
Third place match 2-0   Canada Ocampo, Mayor
  2016 Summer Olympics qualification Group stage 6-0   Puerto Rico Domínguez 3, Garciamendez, Rangel, Johnson
0-1   United States
1-2   Costa Rica 3 / 4 Domínguez
  2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship Group stage 0-6   United States
4-1   Trinidad and Tobago Corral 2, Johnson, Sanchez
0-2   Panama 3/4

Head coaching historyEdit

1. Nicolás Rodríguez[disambiguation needed]: As ‘’La Tri’s’’ first official coach between 1991 and 1998, Rodríguez took an inexperienced and under-resourced squad to the 1991 CONCACAF Women's Championship in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Sending only one qualifier from the confederation to the 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup, this tournament fielded eight teams divided into two groups. Matches were also only 80 minutes long. In Group A, Mexico lost to eventual winner United States 12-0, its worst ever appearance. With a loss against Trinidad and Tobago and a win against Martinique, Mexico finished third in the group, failing to advance to the semifinals. Likewise, during the 1994 CONCACAF Women's Championship, which determined the two qualifiers for the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup, Mexico finished in third place, failing to reach the international tournament yet again.

2. Leonardo Cuéllar: Once a highly-touted player for the Mexico men’s national football team, Cuéllar took over ‘’El Tri Femenil’’ after a brief stint as the women’s soccer coach at CSULA. Head coach until 2016—a period of 18 years—Cuéllar had a questionable record. As head coach, Mexico only qualified for the world cup on three occasions and the Olympics once; his teams never won a single game in any major tournament, nor did they finish first in the CONCACAF Women’s Gold Cup. Common criticism of his leadership was his [nepotism]] and overreliance on US-born players. Cuéllar was never at risk of losing his job despite dubious results, and he even hired close allies, including his son Christopher Cuéllar. He also regularly held tryouts in the United States without doing the same in Mexico.

Initially charged with taking the squad to the 1998 CONCACAF Women's Championship, which would award 1.5 qualification slots to the 1999 Women’s World Cup, he was successful in qualifying for the team’s first ever appearance at the official tournament. Finishing first in its group and winning against Guatemala in the semifinal, Mexico eventually fell 1-0 to Canada in the final. Mexico went on to qualify for the cup after defeating Argentina in the CONCACAF-CONMEBOL playoff match. Cuéllar was very lucky to qualify. The tournament expanded from 12 teams to 16 teams and the United States was the host, so their squad automatically qualified; had these two changes not been made, Mexico would have likely been out.

Cuéllar went on to schedule friendlies and participate in organized tournaments, but with few victories. The team qualified for 2011 and 2015, but his coaching style remained consistent. Frustration grew among his players after his call-ups involved much controversy. As players like Charlyn Corral and Kenti Robles demanded change, Cuéllar began to omit them from future squads. Likewise, he discriminated against Stephany Mayor and Bianca Sierra for being in a relationship, leading to their infrequent call-ups as well. His reign eventually ended when Mexico failed to qualify for the 2016 Summer Olympic Games.

3. Roberto Medina: Promoted from U-20 squad to the senior team without any official announcement from the FMF, Medina served as head coach from 2016 to 2018. With few victories—including a 3-0 win against Venezuela early in his tenure, his technique was essentially a continuation of Cuéllar’s style. Though he was praised after Mexico won the gold during the 2018 Central American and Caribbean Games, he was relieved of his position after failing to advance out of the group stage during the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship. With losses to Panama and the United States, Mexico did not qualify for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup despite having the Liga MX Femenil and the most talented generation it had seen up until this point. Historically weaker teams, such as Jamaica and Panama, advanced further than the squad, signifying that other teams had surpassed Mexico. After his ouster, he became head coach of Tigres. Medina had been the U-20 coach one other time, but elected to coach a men’s team just before a world cup.

4. Christopher Cuéllar: With no official announcement, Cuéllar Jr. replaced Medina after the team failed to qualify for 2019. Cuéllar, the son of Leonardo Cuéllar, was promoted after serving as the U-20 women’s squad coach. Like his predecessors, Cuéllar Jr. has had limited results. With no victory or draw as of the end of the 2019 Women’s World Cup, Cuéllar continued as head coach during the 2019 Pan American Games.

5. Mónica Vergara: Though she has yet to reach the top-stage as head coach of the senior squad, Mónica Vergara is the most successful women’s coach ever and current best coach of any squad, male or female. Leading the U-17 team to second place in the 2018 U-17 Women’s World Cup, she is now the coach of the U-20 squad. Vergara, a former player, is expected to take the helm after Christopher Cuéllar.

RecognitionEdit

DomesticEdit

In various occasions, fans have showed up in large numbers to support ‘’La Tri.’’ When Mexico played against Denmark in the 1971 Women’s World Cup final, over 100,000 showed up at Estadio Azteca. Likewise, when Mexico played Argentina in a playoff game to qualify for the 1999 Women’s World Cup, over 70,000 fans were in attendance.

Until recently, attention around the women’s team was dwarfed by the men’s squad. Few matches were televised or advertised, limiting knowledge around the team’s achievements and struggles. Former ESPN commentator Nelly Simón frequently advocated for more attention to this team. Likewise, after winning the gold medal at the 2018 Central American and Caribbean Games, Kenti Robles called on news outlets and fans to pay more attention to them. However, with increased attention in the women’s game after the establishment of the women’s league in 2017, more games have been televised. Since then, millions watched Mexico play in the U-17 world cup final against Spain in 2018.

InternationalEdit

Mexico has consistently sat between 21 and 31 since FIFA began ranking women’s national teams, with its current ranking at 27   1 (12 July 2019)[1]. Though Costa Rica, Jamaica, and Panama have risen in the rankings, Mexico is still regarded as the third best team in CONCACAF, behind the United States and Canada.

See alsoEdit

Citations

  1. ^ a b c "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 12 July 2019. Retrieved 12 July 2019.
  2. ^ "Costa Rica women have history to draw on in first Women's World Cup". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 2 July 2019.
  3. ^ "Mundial (Women) 1971". Rsssf.com. Retrieved 29 June 2010.
  4. ^ Garin, Erik (11 April 2019). "Mundialito (Women) 1981-1988". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 3 July 2019.
  5. ^ Lewis, Michael (21 January 2012). "Mexico's Leonardo Cuellar Has Turned 'Las Tri' into a Global Power". Fox News Latino. Retrieved 26 January 2012.
  6. ^ Jensen, Mike (17 June 1999). "Mexican Soccer Team Has American Accent Half Of The Improbable Women's World Cup Squad Comes From North Of The Border". The Inquirer. Retrieved 5 February 2012.
  7. ^ "Monica Gonzalez urges Mexican federation to seize opportunity to promote women's game". espnW. Retrieved 16 May 2018.
  8. ^ Baxter, Kevin. "Mexico's women's soccer coach Leonardo Cuellar steps down". latimes.com. Retrieved 16 May 2018.
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  15. ^ "Xolos Femenil Andrea Rodebaugh Resigns as Head Coach". Retrieved 2 July 2019.
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