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Mexico women's national football team

The Mexico women's national football team (sometimes referred to as Las Tri) is governed by La Federación Mexicana de Fútbol (Mexico Football Federation).[2]

Mexico
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)El Tri (The Tri)
El Tricolor (The Tricolor)
AssociationFederación Mexicana de Fútbol
ConfederationCONCACAF (North America, Central America and the Caribbean)
Sub-confederationNAFU (North America)
Head coachChristopher Cuéllar
CaptainNayeli Rangel
Most capsMaribel Dominguez (112)
Top scorerMaribel Domínguez (79)
FIFA codeMEX
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 26 Increase 1 (29 March 2019)[1]
Highest21 (January 2011)
Lowest31 (December 2002)
First international
 Mexico 9–0 Austria 
(Jesolo, Italy; 6 July 1970)
Biggest win
 Mexico 10–0 Malta 
(Bristol, England; 28 June 1997)
 Martinique 0–10 Mexico
(Bridgeview, United States; 18 October 2014)
Biggest defeat
 United States 12–0 Mexico 
(Port-au-Prince, Haiti; 18 April 1991)
World Cup
Appearances3 (first in 1999)
Best resultGroup Stage (1999, 2011, 2015)
CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup
Appearances7 (first in 1991)
Best resultRunners-up Silver medal icon.svg : (1998), (2010)

In the 1970s, Mexico finished third in an unofficial Women's World Cup held in Italy. Also, in 1971, the team hosted an unofficial women's World Cup reaching the final, only to lose to Denmark 3–0. An estimated 110,000 people attended the final at Estadio Azteca that day.[3] The team was formed before the 1999 Women's World Cup and was composed of players having citizenship of Mexico and descendants born elsewhere of Mexico's citizens. The main goal for the team was to qualify for their first World Cup. The team has since then developed and is now ranked 26th in the Women's FIFA World Ranking.[4] One distinction of the team as compared to other teams is that they have had for 14 years, one coach, Leonardo Cuéllar; rare in the world of a national team from Mexico.[5] The team was the host for the 2010 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup, finishing in second place after an unexpected 2–1 victory over the United States. Mexico has a professional league, the Liga MX Femenil, which was established in part to raise the consciousness of women's football in Mexico.

Contents

HistoryEdit

The first official coach for the Mexico women's national football team was Leonardo Cuéllar. One of his main goals when first establishing the team was to qualify for the 1999 Women's World Cup.[5] The team accomplished this by placing second to the Canadian team in the 1998 CONCACAF Women's Championship. After finding a coach to begin the team, controversy soon began regarding the nationality of the players being recruited. Many people in Mexico argued that Mexican-American girls should not be allowed to play on the team because they were taking spots away from full citizens. The team captain, Andrea Rodebaugh, argued that the team's main goal was to qualify and said that to them it did not matter who was on the team as long as the team was formed.[6] The national team was formed despite the controversy and consisted of players holding Mexican citizenship as well as players from the United States. Initially, the language disparity between the Spanish-speaking Mexicans and English-speaking Americans created a lack of cohesion in the team, but the teammates began teaching each other their respective languages.[citation needed]

In recent years, an increase in young talent developing in Mexico brought an increase of expectations from Mexican football fans and media alike. Following their worst ever World Cup finish in 2015, fans began calling for Cuellar's resignation or firing. In 2016, the women's national football team failed to qualify for the Olympics, and lost to Costa Rica which was the turning point in the teams history since many thought the defeat resulted in Mexico becoming the fourth best team in CONCACAF. With these results and Leonardo Cuellar's controversial decision to not bring Charlyn Corral and Kenti Robles, whom had terrific seasons at their clubs in Spain's Primera División, onto the squad[7] led to him resigning from his position in April 2016.[8] Roberto Medina became the head coach in 2017.[9]

In 2018 Mexico won the Central American and Caribbean Games by defeating Costa Rica 3-1 in the final.[10]

At the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship Mexico entered as the third highest ranked team behind the United States and Canada. At the tournament Mexico finished third in their group with a record of one win and two losses, which included a surprising 2-0 loss to Panama. As a result of not advancing to the knockout round, Mexico was unable to qualify for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France.[11]

KitEdit

The Mexico national team utilizes a tricolour system, composed of the colors green, red and white. The team's three colors originated from Mexico's national flag, known as the tricolor. The kit being used 2011–2012 is a green jersey for home and a black with gold jersey for away. Sewn on the inside collar of both jerseys is the Mexican saying somos guerreros meaning "we are warriors".[citation needed]

Recent resultsEdit

2018Edit

2019Edit

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

The following players were called-up for two friendly matches against Canada, New Zealand and the United States on 18, 22 and 26 May 2019, respectively.[12]

Caps and goals as 5 April 2019, after the match against the   Netherlands.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Cecilia Santiago (1994-10-19) 19 October 1994 (age 24) 57 0   América
12 1GK Emily Alvarado (1998-06-09) 9 June 1998 (age 20) 0 0   TCU Horned Frogs

2 2DF Kenti Robles (1991-02-15) 15 February 1991 (age 28) 62 3   Atlético Madrid
3 2DF Jocelyn Orejel (1996-11-14) 14 November 1996 (age 22) 4 0   CSFA Ambilly [fr]
4 2DF Rebeca Bernal (1997-08-31) 31 August 1997 (age 21) 11 0   Monterrey
5 2DF Jimena López (1999-01-30) 30 January 1999 (age 20) 5 0   Texas A&M Aggies
13 2DF Arianna Romero (1992-07-29) 29 July 1992 (age 26) 40 1   Houston Dash
15 2DF Karen Díaz (1998-08-02) 2 August 1998 (age 20) 1 0   Pachuca
19 2DF Andrea Sánchez (1994-03-31) 31 March 1994 (age 25) 0 0   Guadalajara

6 3MF Karla Nieto (1995-01-09) 9 January 1995 (age 24) 18 0   Pachuca
8 3MF Joana Robles (1994-07-26) 26 July 1994 (age 24) 5 0   Atlas
11 3MF Lizbeth Ovalle (1999-10-19) 19 October 1999 (age 19) 7 1   UANL
14 3MF Belén Cruz (1998-11-07) 7 November 1998 (age 20) 0 0   UANL
16 3MF Zulma Hernández (1995-09-09) 9 September 1995 (age 23) 1 0   América
17 3MF Yamilé Franco (1992-07-07) 7 July 1992 (age 26) 6 1   León
18 3MF Alexia Delgado (1999-12-09) 9 December 1999 (age 19) 2 0   Arizona State Sun Devils
20 3MF Dinora Garza (1988-01-24) 24 January 1988 (age 31) 27 5   Monterrey

7 4FW Daniela Espinosa (1999-07-13) 13 July 1999 (age 19) 3 0   América
9 4FW Kiana Palacios (1996-10-01) 1 October 1996 (age 22) 8 1   Real Sociedad
10 4FW Katty Martínez (1998-03-14) 14 March 1998 (age 21) 4 0   UANL

Recent call-upsEdit

These players were called up to the squad in the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Alejandría Godínez (1994-02-24) 24 February 1994 (age 25) 2 0   Pachuca v.   Netherlands, 5 April 2019
GK Itzel González (1994-08-14) 14 August 1994 (age 24) 0 0   Tijuana training sessions from 14–22 January 2019
GK Bianca Henninger (1990-10-22) 22 October 1990 (age 28) 7 0   Houston Dash 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship
GK Pamela Tajonar (1984-12-02) 2 December 1984 (age 34) 39 0   Barcelona 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO

DF Bianca Sierra (1992-06-25) 25 June 1992 (age 26) 47 0   Þór/KA v.   Netherlands, 5 April 2019
DF Kimberly Rodríguez (1999-03-26) 26 March 1999 (age 20) 3 0   Oklahoma State Cowgirls 2019 Cyprus Women's Cup
DF Dirce Delgado (1986-08-29) 29 August 1986 (age 32) 0 0   Toluca training sessions from 14–22 January 2019
DF Christina Murillo (1993-01-28) 28 January 1993 (age 26) 40 1 Unattached 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship
DF Mónica Flores (1996-01-31) 31 January 1996 (age 23) 9 0   Valencia 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship
DF Annia Mejía (1996-03-12) 12 March 1996 (age 23) 4 0   Sporting de Gijón 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE
DF Greta Espinoza (1995-06-05) 5 June 1995 (age 23) 21 0   UANL 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO
DF Vanessa Flores (1997-05-26) 26 May 1997 (age 21) 2 0   West Virginia Mountaineers 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO
DF Clarissa Robles (1994-05-09) 9 May 1994 (age 25) 2 0   LA Galaxy OC 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO
DF Mariel Gutiérrez (1994-08-06) 6 August 1994 (age 24) 0 0 Unattached 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO
DF Marcela Valera (1987-04-12) 12 April 1987 (age 32) 1 0   América v.   France, 1 September 2018
DF Sabrina Flores (1996-01-31) 31 January 1996 (age 23) 0 0   Sky Blue FC training camp on 3–12 June 2018

MF Stephany Mayor (1991-09-23) 23 September 1991 (age 27) 71 11   Þór/KA v.   Netherlands, 5 April 2019
MF María Sánchez (1996-02-20) 20 February 1996 (age 23) 15 3   Chicago Red Stars v.   Netherlands, 5 April 2019
MF Nancy Antonio (1996-04-02) 2 April 1996 (age 23) 12 1   UANL v.   Netherlands, 5 April 2019
MF Cristina Ferral (1993-02-16) 16 February 1993 (age 26) 11 1   UANL v.   Netherlands, 5 April 2019
MF Mónica Ocampo (1987-01-04) 4 January 1987 (age 32) 91 17   Pachuca v.   Netherlands, 5 April 2019 INJ
MF Nayeli Rangel (1992-02-28) 28 February 1992 (age 27) 85 7   UANL 2019 Cyprus Women's Cup
MF Liliana Mercado (1988-10-22) 22 October 1988 (age 30) 13 0   UANL training sessions from 14–22 January 2019
MF Carolina Jaramillo (1994-03-19) 19 March 1994 (age 25) 4 0   UANL 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE
MF Tania Morales (1986-12-22) 22 December 1986 (age 32) 7 2   Guadalajara 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO
MF Natalia Gómez Junco (1992-10-09) 9 October 1992 (age 26) 6 0   UANL 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO
MF Esmeralda Verdugo (1994-01-19) 19 January 1994 (age 25) 2 0   América 2018 Central American and Caribbean Games

FW Charlyn Corral (1991-09-11) 11 September 1991 (age 27) 50 28   Levante v.   Netherlands, 5 April 2019
FW Adriana Iturbide (1993-03-27) 27 March 1993 (age 26) 3 1   Atlas v.   Netherlands, 5 April 2019
FW Desirée Monsiváis (1988-01-19) 19 January 1988 (age 31) 5 3   Monterrey training sessions from 14–22 January 2019
FW Betzy Cuevas (1997-04-21) 21 April 1997 (age 22) 0 0   América training sessions from 14–22 January 2019
FW Katie Johnson (1994-09-14) 14 September 1994 (age 24) 21 8   Chicago Red Stars 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship
FW Ariana Calderón (1990-05-12) 12 May 1990 (age 29) 14 2 Unattached 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship
FW Anisa Guajardo (1991-03-10) 10 March 1991 (age 28) 4 0 Unattached 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO
FW Daniela Solís (1996-10-01) 1 October 1996 (age 22) 0 0   Monterrey 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRO

Notes:

  • PRE: Preliminary squad
  • PRO: Provisional roster

Competitive recordEdit

FIFA Women's World CupEdit

FIFA Women's World Cup Record
Year Round Position MP W D* L GF GA
  1991 Did not qualify
  1995
  1999 Group Stage 16th 3 0 0 3 1 15
  2003 Did not qualify
  2007
  2011 Group Stage 11th 3 0 2 1 3 7
  2015 Group Stage 22nd 3 0 1 2 2 8
  2019 Did not qualify
Total 3/8 9 0 3 6 6 30
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

CONCACAF Women's ChampionshipEdit

CONCACAF Women's Championship Record
Year Round MP W D* L GF GA
  1991 Group Stage 3 1 0 2 9 16
  1993 Did not enter
  1994 Third Place 4 1 1 2 6 19
  1998 Runners-up 5 3 1 1 20 6
  2000 Group Stage 3 1 0 2 10 7
   2002 Third Place 5 3 0 2 11 7
  2006 Third Place 3 2 0 1 6 2
  2010 Runners-up 5 3 0 2 11 7
  2014 Third Place 5 3 0 2 17 7
  2018 Group Stage 3 1 0 2 4 9
Total - 36 18 2 16 94 80
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Olympic GamesEdit

Summer Olympic Games Record
Year Round Position MP W D* L GF GA
  1996 Did not qualify
  2000
  2004 Quarter-Finals 8th 3 0 1 2 1 8
  2008 Did not qualify
  2012
  2016
  2020 To be determined
  2024
  2028
Total - 1/6 3 0 1 2 1 8
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Pan American GamesEdit

Pan American Games Record
Year Round Position MP W D* L GF GA
  1999 Runners-up 2nd 6 3 1 2 15 9
  2003 Third Place 3rd 4 3 0 1 10 5
  2007 Fourth Place 4th 5 3 0 2 6 1
  2011 Third Place 3rd 5 2 2 1 3 2
  2015 Third Place 3rd 5 3 0 2 10 7
  2019 To be determined
  2023
Total - 5/5 25 14 3 8 54 24
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Central American and Caribbean GamesEdit

Central American and Caribbean Games Record
Year Round Position MP W D* L GF GA
  2010 Withdrew
  2014 Champions 1st 5 4 1 0 11 1
  2018 Champions 1st 5 5 0 0 18 3
  2022 To be determined
Total - 2/3 10 9 1 0 29 4
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Overall official recordEdit

Competition Stage Result Opponent Position Scorers
  1991 CONCACAF Tournament Group stage 0–12   United States
1–3   Trinidad and Tobago
8–1   Martinique 3 / 4
  1994 CONCACAF Tournament Group stage 0–9   United States
0–6   Canada
3–1   Jamaica
3–3   Trinidad and Tobago 3 / 5
  1998 CONCACAF Tournament Group stage 3–2   Costa Rica
7–1   Haiti
2–2   Trinidad and Tobago 1 / 4
Semifinals 8–0   Guatemala
Final 0–1   Canada
  1999 World Cup Group stage 1–7   Brazil Domínguez
0–6   Germany
0–2   Italy 4 / 4
  1999 Pan American Games Group stage 1–1   United States
2–3   Canada
5–1   Costa Rica
5–1   Trinidad and Tobago 3 / 5
Semifinals 2–2 (PSO: 5–3)   Canada
Final 0–1   United States
  2000 Gold Cup Group stage 3–4   Canada Domínguez 2, Mora
7–0   Guatemala Mora 4, Domínguez 3
0–3   China 3 / 4
  2002 Gold Cup Group stage 0–3   United States
5–1   Panama Gómez 2, Domínguez, Leyva, Sandoval
2–0   Trinidad and Tobago 2 / 4 Gerardo 2
Semifinals 0–2   Canada
Third place match 4–1   Costa Rica Domínguez 2, González, Mora
  2003 Pan American Games Group stage 1–0   Costa Rica Worbis
3–1   Argentina Mora, Rosales, Worbis
Semifinals 2–3   Canada Leyva, Mora
Third place match 4–1   Argentina Leyva, Mora, Moreno, Rosales
  2004 Summer Olympics Group stage 1–1   China Domínguez
0–2   Germany 2 / 3
Quarterfinals 0–5   Brazil
  2006 Gold Cup Group stage 3–0   Trinidad and Tobago Domínguez, González, P. Pérez
Semifinals 0–2   United States
Third place match 3–0   Jamaica Ocampo 2, Domínguez
2007 World Cup qualification AFC-CONCACAF play-off 0–2 2–1   Japan Domínguez, Leyva
  2007 Pan American Games Group stage 5–0   Paraguay Corral 2, Ocampo 2, Valdez
0–1   Argentina
2–0   Panama Worbis
3–2   United States López 2, Worbis
Semifinals 0–2   Brazil
Third place match 1–2   Canada Worbis
  2008 Summer Olympics qualification Group stage 8–1   Jamaica López 4, Morales 2, Ocampo, Worbis
1–3   United States 2 / 3 Worbis
Semifinals 0–1   Canada
  2010 Gold Cup Group stage 7–2   Guyana Domínguez 4, Garza, Worbis
2–0   Trinidad and Tobago Domínguez, López
0–3   Canada 2 / 4
Semifinals 2–1   United States Domínguez, V. Pérez
Final 0–1   Canada
  2011 World Cup Group stage 1–1   England Ocampo
0–4   Japan
2–2   New Zealand 3 / 4 Domínguez, Mayor
  2011 Pan American Games Group stage 0–0   Chile
1–1   Trinidad and Tobago Domínguez
1–0   Colombia 2 / 4 V. Pérez
Semifinals 0–1   Brazil
Third place match 1–0   Colombia Ruiz
  2012 Summer Olympics qualification' Group stage 5–0   Guatemala Domínguez 3, Diaz, Garza
7–0   Dominican Republic Guajardo 3, Diaz, Ruiz, Saucedo
0–4   United States 2 / 4
Semifinals 1–3   Canada V. Pérez
  2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship Group stage 0-1   Costa Rica
10–0   Martinique Samarzich, Duarte 2, Mayor, Guillou (o.g.), Garciamendez, Garza, Ocampo 2, Noyola
3-1   Jamaica 2 / 4 Mayor, Corral 2
Semifinals 0-3   United States
Third Place Match 4-2   Trinidad and Tobago Mayor, Ocampo, Corral 2
  2015 World Cup Group stage 1–1   Colombia V. Pérez
1–2   England Ibarra
0-5   France 4 / 4
  2015 Pan American Games Group stage 0–1   Colombia
3–1   Argentina Noyola, Rangel, Ruiz
3-1   Trinidad and Tobago 2 / 4 Mayor 2, Ocampo
Semifinals 2-4   Brazil Romero, Rangel
Third place match 2-0   Canada Ocampo, Mayor
  2016 Summer Olympics qualification Group stage 6-0   Puerto Rico Domínguez 3, Garciamendez, Rangel, Johnson
0-1   United States
1-2   Costa Rica 3 / 4 Domínguez
  2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship Group stage 0-6   United States
4-1   Trinidad and Tobago Corral 2, Johnson, Sanchez
0-2   Panama 3/4

Head coaching historyEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Notes

  1. ^ Cite error: The named reference nonFIFA2018 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).

Citations

  1. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 29 March 2019. Retrieved 29 March 2019.
  2. ^ Luis Arroyo (12 June 2015). "The Mexican Women's National Team Needs to Stop Depending on U.S. Based Players | VICE Sports". Sports.vice.com. Retrieved 20 June 2015.
  3. ^ "Mundial (Women) 1971". Rsssf.com. Retrieved 29 June 2010.
  4. ^ "Women's World Ranking". Fifa.com. Retrieved 1 June 2012.
  5. ^ a b Lewis, Michael (21 January 2012). "Mexico's Leonardo Cuellar Has Turned 'Las Tri' into a Global Power". Fox News Latino. Retrieved 26 January 2012.
  6. ^ Jensen, Mike (17 June 1999). "Mexican Soccer Team Has American Accent Half Of The Improbable Women's World Cup Squad Comes From North Of The Border". The Inquirer. Retrieved 5 February 2012.
  7. ^ "Monica Gonzalez urges Mexican federation to seize opportunity to promote women's game". espnW. Retrieved 16 May 2018.
  8. ^ Baxter, Kevin. "Mexico's women's soccer coach Leonardo Cuellar steps down". latimes.com. Retrieved 16 May 2018.
  9. ^ "For Teammates in Love, an Island Oasis". The New York Times. 6 July 2017. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 16 May 2018.
  10. ^ "Central American & Caribbean Games Women". Retrieved 11 October 2018.
  11. ^ "Panama qualified for the semifinals of the 2018 Concacaf Women's Championship". 10 October 2018. Retrieved 11 October 2018.
  12. ^ "Convocatoria de la SNM Femenil Mayor para la gira a Canadá y Estados Unidos". Retrieved 15 May 2019.

External linksEdit