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New Zealand national football team

The New Zealand national football team represents New Zealand in international association football. The team is controlled by the governing body for football in New Zealand New Zealand Football (NZF), which is currently a member of the Oceania Football Confederation (OFC). The team's official nickname is the All Whites.[4] New Zealand is a five-time OFC champion. The team represented New Zealand at the FIFA World Cup tournaments in 1982 and 2010, and the FIFA Confederations Cup tournaments in 1999, 2003, 2009 and 2017. Because most New Zealand football clubs are semi-professional rather than fully professional, most professional New Zealand footballers play for clubs in English-speaking countries such as England, the United States and Australia.

New Zealand
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)All Whites
AssociationNew Zealand Football (NZF)
ConfederationOFC (Oceania)
Head coachvacant
CaptainWinston Reid
Most capsIvan Vicelich (88)
Top scorerVaughan Coveny (28)
Home stadiumQBE Stadium
Westpac Stadium
FIFA codeNZL
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 119 Steady (14 June 2019)[1]
Highest47 (August 2002)
Lowest161 (April–May 2016)
Elo ranking
Current 78 Increase 3 (10 July 2019)[2]
Highest39 (June 1983)
Lowest100 (June 1997)
First international
 New Zealand 3–1 Australia 
(Dunedin, New Zealand; 17 June 1922)
Biggest win
 New Zealand 13–0 Fiji 
(Auckland, New Zealand; 16 August 1981)
Biggest defeat
 New Zealand 0–10 Australia 
(Wellington, New Zealand; 11 July 1936)[3]
World Cup
Appearances2 (first in 1982)
Best resultGroup stage (1982 and 2010)
OFC Nations Cup
Appearances10 (first in 1973)
Best resultChampions (1973, 1998, 2002, 2008 and 2016)
Confederations Cup
Appearances4 (first in 1999)
Best resultGroup stage

Contents

HistoryEdit

Early yearsEdit

 
New Zealand playing Australia in 1922

New Zealand's first international football match was played in Dunedin at the old Caledonian Ground on 23 July 1904 against a team representing New South Wales. New Zealand lost by the game's only goal, but drew with the same team 3–3 in a game at Athletic Park, Wellington seven days later.[5] The following year the team played a Wellington representative side on 10 June before embarking on a tour of Australia, during which they played eleven representative sides, including three "test matches" against New South Wales. Of these three matches they won one, lost one, and drew one.

A New Zealand national team did not play again until 1921, when New Zealand played three official full internationals against Australia, played at Carisbrook in Dunedin, Athletic Park in Wellington, and Auckland Domain. The results were two 3–1 wins to New Zealand and a 1–1 draw in Wellington.[6] In 1927, Canada became the second team to play in New Zealand as they played in four official matches with a win and a draw.[7]

New Zealand would become one of the founder members of the Oceania Football Confederation in 1966 which was founded between Charles Dempsey and his Australian colleague Jim Bayutti in founding the federation.[8]

Recent successEdit

 
New Zealand vs Australia friendly match at Craven Cottage, London, England, 9 June 2005.

Since the 1990s, United States college soccer has played a significant role in the development of New Zealand players. This influence began when former Scotland international Bobby Clark returned to the U.S. after his 1994–96 stint as New Zealand head coach to take the head coaching job at Stanford University (he now holds the same position at Notre Dame). Clark began recruiting in New Zealand, and former New Zealand national players Ryan Nelsen and Simon Elliott played for him at Stanford. The trend that Clark started has continued to the present; more than two dozen New Zealanders are now playing for NCAA Division I men's programs in the U.S.[9] A common next step in these players' career paths is a stint in Major League Soccer; ESPNsoccernet journalist Brent Latham speculated in a March 2010 story that New Zealand's 2010 FIFA World Cup squad could have more MLS players than the U.S. squad.[9][10] However, Latham's speculation did not prove true, as only one MLS player made the New Zealand squad for the World Cup. New Zealand formerly competed against Australia for top honours in the OFC. However, after Australia left to join the AFC in 2006, New Zealand were left as the only seeded team in the OFC. New Zealand qualified for the 2010 FIFA World Cup though exited the competition after the first round despite being the only team not to lose a game during the tournament.[11] The tournament also featured one of New Zealand's most notable results, a 1–1 draw with the then world champions Italy. New Zealand drew their other two pool games with Slovakia and Paraguay and ultimately finished above Italy, who placed last, in the group. New Zealand drew all three games and finished third in their group. New Zealand were also the only undefeated team in the entire tournament thanks to Spain's defeat to Switzerland.

2018 FIFA World Cup qualificationEdit

In August 2014, Anthony Hudson was appointed manager of the All Whites. Hudson's first game in charge of the national team was a 3–1 defeat away to Uzbekistan in September 2014. As a result of the All Whites playing “just three matches” in the previous year, which was “the least of any country in world football”,[12] and having “seven months without a match” the All Whites dropped to 161 in the FIFA world rankings.[13][14][14] The All Whites went on to win the 2016 OFC Nations Cup, winning four matches with the final being won via a penalty shootout after a 0–0 draw against Papua New Guinea, conceding only 1 goal, from a penalty, in the process. New Zealand’s victory saw them crowned Oceania champions making New Zealand the most successful national team in the competition's history, having won the tournament five times, and also saw them qualify for the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup in Russia. The All Whites moved up 54 places in the world rankings in July and achieved 88th in the FIFA world rankings, the highest ranking in three years, on the back of the OFC Nations Cup victory that qualified them for the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup.[15][16]

After a disappointing tournament at the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup where they finished bottom of their group which featured Russia, Mexico and Portugal, the national team fell 27 places to 122nd.[17] In September 2017, New Zealand won the OFC Final against the Solomon Islands with an aggregate score of 8–3 to qualify for the inter-continental play-off qualifier against Peru, the fifth-ranked nation from the South America's qualifiers.[18] [19]After holding Peru off in the first leg, they would go to lose 2-0 in the second leg to be eliminated from competition as Peru became the last team to qualify for the 2018 FIFA World Cup.[20][21]

RivalriesEdit

New Zealand's long time rivals are Trans-Tasman neighbors Australia.[22] The two teams' history dates back to 1922, where they first met in both their international debuts. The rivalry between the Socceroos (Australia) and the All Whites (New Zealand) is part of a wider friendly rivalry between the geographical neighbours Australia and New Zealand, which applies not only to sport but to the culture of the two countries. The rivalry was intensified when Australia and New Zealand were both members of the OFC, regularly competing in OFC Nations Cup finals and in FIFA World Cup qualifications, where only one team from the OFC progressed to the World Cup. Since Australia left the OFC to join the AFC in 2006, competition between the two teams has been less frequent. However, the rivalry between the two teams is still strong, with the occasional match receiving much media and public attention.[23] The rivalry extends to club football, with New Zealand's only fully professional team, the Wellington Phoenix, playing in the Australian A-League.

Coaching staffEdit

Position Name
Head Coach Vacant
Technical Director   Andrew Boyens
Assistant Coach   Des Buckingham
Assistant Coach   José Figueira
Goalkeeping Coach Vacant
Team Manager Vacant
Performance Analyst Vacant
Sports Science / S&C   Danny Deigan
Doctor   Chan Dassanayake
Physiotherapist   Roland Jeffery
Physiotherapist   Mark Palmer

PlayersEdit

For all past and present players who have appeared for the national team, see New Zealand national team players.

Current squadEdit

The following players were called up for the consultation camp on 23-29 May 2019.
Caps and goals updated as of 7 June 2018 after the game against India.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Stefan Marinovic (1991-10-07) 7 October 1991 (age 27) 24 0   Wellington Phoenix
12 1GK Max Crocombe (1993-08-12) 12 August 1993 (age 25) 2 0   Salford City
23 1GK Nik Tzanev (1996-12-23) 23 December 1996 (age 22) 1 0   AFC Wimbledon

5 2DF Michael Boxall (1988-08-18) 18 August 1988 (age 30) 31 0   Minnesota United
3 2DF Deklan Wynne (1995-03-20) 20 March 1995 (age 24) 15 0   Colorado Rapids
2 2DF Sam Brotherton (1996-10-02) 2 October 1996 (age 22) 12 0   North Carolina
16 2DF Dane Ingham (1999-06-08) 8 June 1999 (age 20) 7 0   Brisbane Roar
4 2DF Nikko Boxall (1992-02-24) 24 February 1992 (age 27) 3 0   Viborg
13 2DF Justin Gulley (1993-01-15) 15 January 1993 (age 26) 3 0   Wellington Phoenix

8 3MF Michael McGlinchey (1987-01-07) 7 January 1987 (age 32) 52 5   Central Coast Mariners
11 3MF Marco Rojas (1991-11-05) 5 November 1991 (age 27) 40 5   SønderjyskE
6 3MF Tim Payne (1994-01-10) 10 January 1994 (age 25) 18 2   Eastern Suburbs
15 3MF Clayton Lewis (1997-02-12) 12 February 1997 (age 22) 14 0   Scunthorpe United
7 3MF Cameron Howieson (1994-12-22) 22 December 1994 (age 24) 13 0   Auckland City
19 3MF Moses Dyer (1997-03-21) 21 March 1997 (age 22) 11 1   Florø
10 3MF Alex Rufer (1996-06-12) 12 June 1996 (age 23) 6 0   Wellington Phoenix
21 3MF Matthew Ridenton (1996-03-11) 11 March 1996 (age 23) 5 0   Newcastle Jets

9 4FW Chris Wood (1991-12-07) 7 December 1991 (age 27) 56 24   Burnley
14 4FW Myer Bevan (1997-04-23) 23 April 1997 (age 22) 6 2 Unattached

Recent call-upsEdit

The following players have also been called up to represent New Zealand in the last 12 months and are still eligible for selection:

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Michael Woud (1999-01-16) 16 January 1999 (age 20) 1 0   Willem II 2018 Intercontinental Cup

DF Tom Doyle (1992-06-30) 30 June 1992 (age 27) 11 0 Unattached 2018 Intercontinental Cup
DF Te Atawhai Hudson-Wihongi (1995-03-27) 27 March 1995 (age 24) 8 0   Auckland City 2018 Intercontinental Cup
DF Adam Mitchell (1996-06-01) 1 June 1996 (age 23) 4 0   Team Wellington 2018 Intercontinental Cup
DF Liberato Cacace (2000-09-27) 27 September 2000 (age 18) 2 0   Wellington Phoenix 2018 Intercontinental Cup

MF Henry Cameron (1997-06-28) 28 June 1997 (age 22) 5 0   Team Wellington 2018 Intercontinental Cup
MF Sarpreet Singh (1999-02-20) 20 February 1999 (age 20) 4 1   Bayern Munich II 2018 Intercontinental Cup
MF Jai Ingham (1993-08-14) 14 August 1993 (age 25) 4 0   Melbourne Victory 2018 Intercontinental Cup

FW Andre De Jong (1996-11-02) 2 November 1996 (age 22) 2 1   AmaZulu 2018 Intercontinental Cup

Results and fixturesEdit

For all past match results of the national team, see the team's 1922–69 results page, 1970–99 results page and 2000–present results page.

2018Edit

2019Edit

Player recordsEdit

Most capsEdit

Caps and goals updated as 11 October 2017.

# Player Period Caps Goals
1 Ivan Vicelich 1995–2013 88 6
2 Simon Elliott 1995–2011 69 6
3 Vaughan Coveny 1992–2006 64 28
4 Ricki Herbert 1980–1989 61 7
5 Chris Jackson 1992–2003 60 10
6 Brian Turner 1967–1982 59 21
7= Duncan Cole 1978–1988 58 4
7= Steve Sumner 1976–1988 58 22
7= Shane Smeltz 2003–2017 58 24
10 Chris Zoricich 1988–2003 57 1

Most goalsEdit

Players in bold still active at international level.

# Player Period Goals Caps
1 Vaughan Coveny 1992–2006 28 64
2= Shane Smeltz 2003–2017 24 58
2= Chris Wood 2009– 24 56
4 Steve Sumner 1976–1988 22 58
5 Brian Turner 1967–1982 21 59
6 Jock Newall 1951–1952 17 10
7= Keith Nelson 1977–1983 16 20
7= Chris Killen 2000–2013 16 48
9 Grant Turner 1980–1988 15 42
10= Wynton Rufer 1980–1997 12 23
10= Darren McClennan 1986–1997 12 43
10= Michael McGarry 1986–1997 12 54

Competitive recordEdit

For the all-time record of the national team against opposing nations, see the team's all-time record page.

Pld W D L GF GA GD
387 159 70 158 677 594 +83

FIFA World CupEdit

New Zealand's FIFA World Cup record Qualification record
Host nation(s)
and year
Round Pos Pld W D* L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
  1930 Did not participate Did not participate
  1934
  1938
  1950
  1954
  1958
  1962
  1966
  1970 Did not qualify 2 0 0 2 0 6
  1974 6 0 3 3 5 12
  1978 4 2 1 1 14 4
  1982 Group stage 23rd 3 0 0 3 2 12 15 9 5 1 44 10
  1986 Did not qualify 6 3 1 2 13 7
  1990 6 3 1 2 13 8
  1994 6 3 1 2 15 5
  1998 6 3 0 3 13 6
    2002 6 4 0 2 20 7
  2006 5 3 0 2 17 5
  2010 Group stage 22nd 3 0 3 0 2 2 8 6 1 1 15 5
  2014 Did not qualify 11 8 1 2 24 13
  2018 13 8 4 1 24 6
  2022 To be determined
      2026
Total Group stage 2/23 6 0 3 3 4 14 94 52 18 24 217 94

FIFA Confederations CupEdit

New Zealand's FIFA Confederations Cup record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1992 No OFC representative invited
  1995
  1997 Did not qualify
  1999 Group stage 8th 3 0 0 3 1 6
    2001 Did not qualify
  2003 Group stage 8th 3 0 0 3 1 11
  2005 Did not qualify
  2009 Group stage 8th 3 0 1 2 0 7
  2013 Did not qualify
  2017 Group stage 8th 3 0 0 3 1 8
Total Group stage 4/10 12 0 1 11 3 32

OFC Nations CupEdit

New Zealand's OFC Nations Cup record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1973 Champions 1st 5 4 1 0 13 4
  1980 Group stage 5th 3 1 0 2 7 8
1996 Third place 3rd 2 0 1 1 0 3
  1998 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 11 1
  2000 Runners-up 2nd 4 3 0 1 7 3
  2002 Champions 1st 5 5 0 0 23 2
  2004 Third place 3rd 5 3 0 2 17 5
2008 Champions 1st 6 5 0 1 14 5
  2012 Third place 3rd 5 3 1 1 8 7
  2016 Champions 1st 5 4 1* 0 10 1
Total 5 titles 10/10 44 33 3 8 110 39
*Denotes draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking". FIFA. 14 June 2019. Retrieved 14 June 2019.
  2. ^ Elo rankings change compared to one year ago. "World Football Elo Ratings". eloratings.net. 10 July 2019. Retrieved 10 July 2019.
  3. ^ "New Zealand matches, ratings and points exchanged". www.eloratings.net.
  4. ^ Burgess, Michael (8 May 2018). "New Zealand Football announce parity for Football Ferns and All Whites". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 19 May 2018.
  5. ^ "New South Wales Tour of New Zealand 1904". RSSSF. 29 November 2018. Retrieved 10 May 2019.
  6. ^ Hilton, T. (1991) An association with soccer. Auckland: The New Zealand Football Association. ISBN 0-473-01291-X. pp. 143–144.
  7. ^ "Overseas Tours by Canadian Teams: New Zealand Tour, 1927". Canadian Soccer History. Retrieved 10 May 2019.
  8. ^ "History". Oceania Football Confederation. Retrieved 10 May 2019.
  9. ^ a b Latham, Brent (17 March 2010). "U.S. connection helps New Zealand". ESPNsoccernet. Retrieved 21 March 2010.
  10. ^ Latham's piece directly states; "From his post across the Pacific Ocean, Ricki Herbert may have a more profound interest in labor peace in America [referring to a possible MLS player strike that was averted days after the piece] than anyone in the history of New Zealand, because when his team kicks off the World Cup against Slovakia on 15 June, the All-Whites' lineup could feature even more MLS players than [U.S. national coach Bob] Bradley's."
  11. ^ "All Whites grab slice of history". TVNZ. 12 July 2010. Retrieved 29 December 2011.
  12. ^ "National Teams". Soccerway. 1 January 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  13. ^ "All Whites coach Anthony Hudson hits out over NZ football culture, lack of games". Newshub. 8 April 2016. Retrieved 4 April 2017.
  14. ^ a b "All Whites drop to record-low ranking". Newshub. 8 April 2016. Retrieved 4 April 2017.
  15. ^ "Argentina stay top as All Whites and EURO heroes soar". FIFA. 15 July 2016. Retrieved 5 October 2016.
  16. ^ "FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking – New Zealand". FIFA. 31 July 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  17. ^ "All Whites drop 27 places in FIFA rankings, Germany back atop after Confederations Cup win". Stuff. Retrieved 6 July 2017.
  18. ^ "All Whites book intercontinental place". NZ Football. Retrieved 1 October 2017.
  19. ^ Hyslop, Liam. "All Whites to play Peru for place at the 2018 World Cup". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 11 October 2017.
  20. ^ "New Zealand and Peru battle to 0-0 draw in World Cup playoff". theguardian.com. 11 November 2017. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  21. ^ "Peru beat New Zealand 2-0 to become the final nation to qualify for the 2018 Russia World Cup". The Independent. 16 November 2017. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  22. ^ "All Whites backing derby rivalry to get them through". nzfootball.co.nz. Retrieved 30 September 2013.
  23. ^ "Tell us your top Socceroos-All Whites games as a precursor to another trans-Tasman showdown". foxsports.com.au. Retrieved 30 September 2013.

External linksEdit