Auckland City FC

Auckland City Football Club is a New Zealand professional football club based in the suburb of Sandringham in Auckland, New Zealand. They currently compete in the Northern League. Auckland City have established themselves as a major force in both New Zealand and Oceania, having won eight New Zealand Football Championship titles and nine OFC Champions League titles since their foundation.[1][2]

Auckland City
Auckland City FC logo 2020.png
Full nameAuckland City Football Club
Nickname(s)City
The Navy Blues
Short nameACFC
Founded2004; 17 years ago (2004)[1]
GroundKiwitea Street
Capacity3,500
Coordinates36°53′51″S 174°44′13″E / 36.89750°S 174.73694°E / -36.89750; 174.73694Coordinates: 36°53′51″S 174°44′13″E / 36.89750°S 174.73694°E / -36.89750; 174.73694
ChairmanIvan Vuksich
ManagerJosé Figueira
LeagueNew Zealand National League
2020–211st (runners up in Grand Final) NZFC
WebsiteClub website
Current season

Formed in 2004 following the inception of the New Zealand Football Championship, Auckland City currently play their home matches at Kiwitea Street in Sandringham, New Zealand.[3] The club is the most successful in Oceania, having won seven consecutive OFC Champions League titles between 2011 and 2017 – the most consecutive continental titles of any football team in history.[4] This has resulted in Auckland becoming a regular fixture at the FIFA Club World Cup, famously achieving a third-placed finish in the 2014 edition.[5][6] Auckland City's youth team formerly played in the National Youth League, becoming the most successful team in competition history with seven titles.[7]

Auckland City's regular kit colours are faintly striped royal blue shirts and shorts with white socks. The current crest, in use since the club's inception, features the Sky Tower, an iconic Auckland landmark.

HistoryEdit

 
The Auckland City team in 2011

Auckland City has won the New Zealand Football Championship regular season eleven times, and the Grand Final eight times. They represented the Oceania Football Confederation (OFC) in the OFC Champions League, which they won most recently in 2017 for the ninth time (seventh in a row). With a third place in 2014, they also became the only OFC team to reach the semi-finals of the FIFA Club World Cup. They are also the only team to win the continental treble three times.

In 2017, Auckland City were invited to play in the Lunar New Year Cup, a friendly tournament hosted in Hong Kong.[8] Auckland City defeated South Korean champions FC Seoul in the semifinal, before defeating Hong Kong side Kitchee in the final to lift the trophy.[9] Auckland City were again invited for the 2019 edition, falling to Chinese Super League club Shandong Luneng 2–1.[10]

Following the conclusion of the 2018–19 season, in which Auckland City won all but one game in their undefeated season but fell short in both the OFC Champions League and the league playoffs, long-term manager Ramon Tribulietx brought his association with the club to an end and was replaced by Team Wellington coach José Figueira ahead of the 2019–20 season.[11][12]

FIFA Club World CupEdit

2009

Auckland City overcame local champions Al Ahli 2–0 in the opening play-off match, with goals by Adam Dickinson and Chad Coombes. In their quarter final clash against CONCACAF champions Atlante of Mexico, the side lost 0–3.

The play-off for fifth and sixth place was described by coach Paul Posa as "the greatest night in the history of Auckland City Football Club", as the team defeated CAF Champions League winners TP Mazembe of the Democratic Republic of Congo 3–2. The goal scorers on this special occasion were Jason Hayne with two and Riki van Steeden.

These historic victories were the first recorded by a New Zealand team at the Club World Cup, and the first by an amateur side at this tournament. This was also the first time that a senior men's representative team from New Zealand has recorded a victory in a world FIFA competition.

2014

Auckland City played Moroccan league champions Moghreb Tétouan in a play-off for the quarter-finals on 10 December. The match finished goalless, with Auckland winning 4–3 in a penalty shoot-out and qualifying for a quarter-final clash against AFC Champions League winners ES Sétif.[13] Auckland City defeated ES Sétif 1–0, courtesy of a John Irving goal, and advanced to the semi-finals for the first time ever.

Auckland played Copa Libertadores champions San Lorenzo in the semifinals, but lost 2–1. A shock seemed possible when a second-half goal from Ángel Berlanga cancelled out Pablo Barrientos' first-half strike for San Lorenzo, but substitute Mauro Matos netted San Lorenzo's winner in extra time.[5]

They finished the tournament with a historic 4-2 penalty shootout win over CONCACAF Champions League winners Cruz Azul in the third-place playoff after a 1–1 draw at full time, with substitute Sanni Issa scoring the ultimate penalty just days after signing for the club.[14][15] The result gained the side worldwide acclaim, as the team of part-timers and amateurs defied all expectations in the competition. Club stalwart and defender Ivan Vicelich came third in the Golden Ball award for best player at the tournament, behind Cristiano Ronaldo and Sergio Ramos of Real Madrid.[16]

Current players and staffEdit

First-team squadEdit

As of 23 January 2021[17][18]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
1 GK   ESP Eñaut Zubikarai
2 MF   NZL Mario Ilich
3 DF   NZL Adam Mitchell
4 MF   CRO Mario Bilen
6 DF   VAN Brian Kaltak
7 MF   NZL Cameron Howieson
8 MF   ESP Albert Riera
9 MF   NZL Kayne Vincent
10 MF   NZL Dylan Manickum
11 DF   NZL Tom Doyle
12 DF   NZL Sam Brotherton
13 MF   RSA Deandre Vollenhoven
No. Pos. Nation Player
14 DF   NZL Jordan Vale
15 MF   NZL Aidan Carey
16 MF   IRQ Yousif Ali Al-Kalisy
17 DF   NZL Andrew Blake
18 GK   NZL Conor Tracey
19 FW   NZL Logan Rogerson
20 MF   NZL Addison Stewart
21 FW   COK Maro Bonsu-Maro
22 MF   NZL Kristoff Muller
23 DF   NZL Alfie Rogers
24 GK   NZL Cameron Brown

Coaching staffEdit

Position
Manager   José Figueira
Assistant manager   Ivan Vicelich
Team manager   Keith Coton
Goalkeeper coach   Eñaut Zubikarai
Fitness coach   Adrià Casals
Technical analyst   Jacob Weaver

Medical staffEdit

Position Name
Physiotherapist   Matt Payne
  Danny Kelly
Club doctor   Craig Panther
Massage therapist   Natalia Kosińska
  Eva Nagy

ManagersEdit

Notable former playersEdit

The following players gained international caps for their respective countries. Players listed in bold represented their countries while playing for Auckland City.

The following foreign players made at least 50 appearances in a professional league prior to or following their time at Auckland City.

StadiumEdit

 
Kiwitea Street in 2011

Freyberg Field, then a public park, was made available for use as a football field in 1965 for tenants Central United. Following intense development on what became affectionately known as Kiwitea Street, the field quickly became one of the best playing surfaces in New Zealand, and was made available to Auckland City following their foundation in 2004. Since then, the amenities at Kiwitea Street have been overhauled, including a new clubrooms and a resurfaced pitch in 2007.

The stadium seats 250 spectators, with additional standing room.

ResultsEdit

DomesticEdit

Year Competition Position Played Won Draw Lost GS GA Points Finals series Top goalscorer Total
2004–05[19] New Zealand Football Championship 1st 21 14 4 3 53 24 46 Champions Grant Young 15
2005–06[20] New Zealand Football Championship 1st 21 16 0 5 63 28 48 Champions Keryn Jordan 22
2006–07[21] New Zealand Football Championship 3rd 21 12 6 3 50 30 42 Champions Grant Young 11
2007–08[22] New Zealand Football Championship 2nd 21 16 2 3 44 16 50 Preliminary Finals Bryan Little 8
2008–09[23] New Zealand Football Championship 2nd 14 8 1 5 27 15 25 Champions Keryn Jordan
Paul Urlovic
5
2009–10[24] New Zealand Football Championship 1st 14 9 4 1 33 13 31 Semi-finals Jason Hayne 7
2010–11[25] New Zealand Football Championship 2nd 14 9 3 2 29 12 30 Runners-up Daniel Koprivcic 7
2011–12[26] New Zealand Football Championship 1st 14 11 3 0 43 11 36 Semi-finals Manel Expósito 9
2012–13[27] New Zealand Football Championship 2nd 14 10 3 1 40 13 33 Runners-up Manel Expósito 11
2013–14[28] New Zealand Football Championship 1st 14 10 3 1 40 12 33 Champions Emiliano Tade 17
2014–15[29] New Zealand Football Championship 1st 14 12 0 2 39 14 42 Champions David Browne 7
2015–16[30] New Zealand Football Championship 1st 14 12 2 0 43 12 38 Runners-up Ryan De Vries 15
2016–17[31] New Zealand Football Championship 1st 18 11 3 4 35 15 36 Runners-up Emiliano Tade 13
2017–18[32] New Zealand Football Championship 1st 18 12 4 2 41 12 40 Champions Emiliano Tade 18
2018–19[33] New Zealand Football Championship 1st 18 17 1 0 46 18 52 Semi-finals Javier López 8
2019–20[34] New Zealand Football Championship 1st 16 11 4 1 42 15 37 Not played due to Covid-19 Myer Bevan 15
2020–21[35] New Zealand Football Championship 1st 14 8 4 2 27 13 28 Runners-up Logan Rogerson 8
2021[36] Northern League 1st 18 15 1 2 63 19 46

ContinentalEdit

Season Competition Round Club Home Away Position
2005[37] OFC Club Championship Preliminary round   Manumea w/d1
Group A   Sydney FC 2–3 3rd
  AS Pirae 0–1
  Sobou 6–1
2006[38] OFC Club Championship Group A   Sobou 7–0 1st
  Marist Fire 3–1
  AS Pirae 1–0
Semi Final   Nokia Eagles 9–1
Final   AS Pirae 3–1 Champions
2007[39] OFC Champions League Group Stage   Waitakere United 2–2 2–2 2nd
  Mont-Dore 4–0 2–0
2007–08[40] OFC Champions League Group Stage   Waitakere United 0–1 1–1 2nd
  A.S. Manu-Ura 6–0 1–0
2008–09[41] OFC Champions League Group A   Waitakere United 2–2 3–1 1st
  Port Vila Sharks 8–1 2–0
Final   Koloale 2–2 7–2 Champions
2009–10[42] OFC Champions League Group A   Waitakere United 2–2 1–1 2nd
  AS Magenta 2–1 1–1
  A.S. Manu-Ura 5–0 2–0
2010–11[43] OFC Champions League Group B   AS Magenta 3–0 1–0 1st
  Waitakere United 1–1 1–0
  A.S. Tefana 1–1 5–0
Final   Amicale 2–1 4–0 Champions
2011–12[44] OFC Champions League Group B   Hekari United 2–0 1–1 1st
  Koloale 7–3 4–1
  Amicale 3–2 0–1
Final   A.S. Tefana 2–1 1–0 Champions
2012–13[45] OFC Champions League Group B   Waitakere United 0–1 3–1 2nd
  A.S. Dragon 1–3 1–1
  Mont-Dore 12–2 2–0
Semi Final   Ba 6–1 1–0
Final   Amicale 2–1 Champions
2013–14[46] OFC Champions League Group B   Nadi 3–0 2nd
  A.S. Dragon 3–0
  Amicale 1–0
Semi Final   AS Pirae 3–0 1–2
Final   Amicale 2–1 1–1 Champions
2014–15[47] OFC Champions League Group B   Suva 3–0 1st
  Western United 3–0
  Amicale 3–0
Semi Final   Gaïtcha FCN 1–0
Final   Team Wellington 1–1
4–3 (Pens.)
Champions
2016[48] OFC Champions League Group A   Lae City Dwellers 2–1 1st
  Solomon Warriors 4–0
  Amicale 3–1
Semi Final   A.S. Tefana 4–2
Final   Team Wellington 3–0 Champions
2017[49] OFC Champions League Group C   Lae City Dwellers 2–0 1st
  Western United 2–1
  Malampa Revivors 11–0
Semi Final   A.S. Tefana 2–0 2–0
Final   Team Wellington 3–0 2–0 Champions
2018[50] OFC Champions League Group C   Vénus 7–0 1st
  Madang 5–0
  Lautoka 1–0
Quarter Final   Solomon Warriors 2–0
Semi Final   Team Wellington 0–0 2–22
2019[51] OFC Champions League Group D   AS Magenta 2–1 1st
  Tupapa Maraerenga 15–0
  Solomon Warriors 6–0
Quarter Final   Toti City 4–0
Semi Final   AS Magenta 1–2
2020[52] OFC Champions League Group D3   Ba 6–0 1st
  Vénus 1–0
  Lupe o le Soaga 2–0
Notes
  • Note 1: Auckland City received a bye because Manumea were withdrawn by the Oceania Football Confederation.
  • Note 2: Team Wellington won on away goal rule.[53]
  • Note 3: On 4 September 2020, OFC announced that the knockout stage was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[54]

InternationalEdit

FIFA Club World CupEdit

Year FIFA Club World Cup Top goalscorer Managers
Country. Pl. W D L GS GA Place
2006 Japan 2 0 0 2 0 5 6th 0 Allan Jones
2009 UAE 3 2 0 1 5 5 5th Jason Hayne 2 Paul Posa
2011 Japan 1 0 0 1 0 2 7th 0 Ramon Tribulietx
2012 Japan 1 0 0 1 0 1 7th 0 Ramon Tribulietx
2013 Morocco 1 0 0 1 1 2 7th Roy Krishna 1 Ramon Tribulietx
2014 Morocco 4 1 2 1 3 3 3rd Three Players 1 Ramon Tribulietx
2015 Japan 1 0 0 1 0 2 7th 0 Ramon Tribulietx
2016 Japan 1 0 0 1 1 2 7th Kim Dae-wook 1 Ramon Tribulietx
2017 UAE 1 0 0 1 0 1 7th 0 Ramon Tribulietx
Season Competition Round Club Score
2006 FIFA Club World Cup Quarter-finals   Al-Ahly 0–2
Fifth place play-off   Jeonbuk Hyundai Motors 0–3
2009 FIFA Club World Cup Play-off for quarter-finals   Al-Ahli 2–0
Quarter-finals   Atlante 0–3
Match for fifth place   TP Mazembe 3–2
2011 FIFA Club World Cup Play-off for quarter-finals   Kashiwa Reysol 0–2
2012 FIFA Club World Cup Play-off for quarter-finals   Sanfrecce Hiroshima 0–1
2013 FIFA Club World Cup Play-off for quarter-finals   Raja Casablanca 1–2
2014 FIFA Club World Cup Play-off for quarter-finals   Moghreb Tetouan 0–0 (a.e.t.)
(4–3 p)
Quarter-finals   ES Sétif 1–0
Semi-finals   San Lorenzo 1–2 (a.e.t.)
Match for third place   Cruz Azul 1–1
(4–2 p)
2015 FIFA Club World Cup Play-off for quarter-finals   Sanfrecce Hiroshima 0–2
2016 FIFA Club World Cup Play-off for quarter-finals   Kashima Antlers 1–2
2017 FIFA Club World Cup Play-off for quarter-finals   Al-Jazira 0–1
2020 FIFA Club World Cup Withdrew due to COVID-19 pandemic[55]

HonoursEdit

DomesticEdit

Premiers (11): 2004–05, 2005–06, 2009–10, 2011–12, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2020–21
Champions (8): 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2014, 2015, 2018, 2020

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2019–20 season was concluded after 16 rounds. The remaining two rounds of the regular season and the finals series were cancelled. Auckland City, who were leading the regular season table, were declared champions and also awarded the Minor Premiership.[56][57]

Champions: 2021
Champions: 2011–12, 2013–14, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2018–19
Champions: 2007, 2009, 2012, 2013, 2017

InternationalEdit

Bronze Medal: 2014
Champions: 2006, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
Champions: 2014

FriendliesEdit

Champions: 2017

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "About Auckland City Football Club". Auckland City FC. Retrieved 16 December 2018.
  2. ^ "National League". www.ultimatenzsoccer.com. Retrieved 16 December 2018.
  3. ^ "Contact". Auckland City FC. Retrieved 16 December 2018.
  4. ^ FIFA.com (8 May 2017). "Seventh heaven for Auckland City". FIFA.com. Retrieved 16 December 2018.
  5. ^ a b "Auckland City FC win international praise for Club World Cup effort". Stuff. 18 December 2014. Retrieved 16 December 2018.
  6. ^ FIFA.com. "FIFA Club World Cup Morocco 2014 - Matches - Cruz Azul-Auckland City FC". FIFA.com. Retrieved 16 December 2018.
  7. ^ "NYL – Auckland City claim title". www.nzfootball.co.nz. Archived from the original on 20 November 2018. Retrieved 16 December 2018.
  8. ^ "Auckland FC get invite to prestigious Hong Kong tournament". 17 January 2017.
  9. ^ "Auckland City FC lift Nike Lunar New Year Cup in Hong Kong". 31 January 2017.
  10. ^ https://www.hkfa.com/en/match/28088
  11. ^ "Long-serving coach Ramon Tribulietx leaves Auckland City FC". 5 June 2019.
  12. ^ "Jose Figueira named Auckland City FC coach".
  13. ^ "Moghreb 0 Auckland 0". Goal.com. 10 December 2014. Retrieved 11 December 2014.
  14. ^ "Auckland sink Setif to book spot in semis". FIFA.com. FIFA. Retrieved 13 December 2014.
  15. ^ "'Maybe now they'll know me in Nigeria!' - Auckland City's Club World Cup hero Sanni Issa - Goal.com". www.goal.com. Retrieved 16 December 2018.
  16. ^ FIFA.com. "FIFA Club World Cup UAE 2018 - News - Ramos outshines the rest - FIFA.com". www.fifa.com. Retrieved 16 December 2018.
  17. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 12 February 2021. Retrieved 23 January 2021.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  18. ^ "Brotherton and Vincent join Navy Blues".
  19. ^ "2004-05 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  20. ^ "2005-06 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  21. ^ "2006-07 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  22. ^ "2007-08 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  23. ^ "2008-09 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  24. ^ "2009-10 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  25. ^ "2010-11 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  26. ^ "2011-12 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  27. ^ "2012-13 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  28. ^ "2013-14 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  29. ^ "2014-15 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  30. ^ "2015-16 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  31. ^ "2016-17 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  32. ^ "2017-18 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  33. ^ "2018-19 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  34. ^ "2019–20 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  35. ^ "2020–21 Premiership - New Zealand". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  36. ^ "2021 Northern League - New Zealand". Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  37. ^ "2005 OFC Champions League - Oceania". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  38. ^ "2006 OFC Champions League - Oceania". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  39. ^ "2007 OFC Champions League - Oceania". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  40. ^ "2007-08 OFC Champions League - Oceania". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  41. ^ "2008-09 OFC Champions League - Oceania". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  42. ^ "2009-10 OFC Champions League - Oceania". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  43. ^ "2010-11 OFC Champions League - Oceania". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  44. ^ "2011–12 OFC Champions League - Oceania". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  45. ^ "2012–13 OFC Champions League - Oceania". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  46. ^ "2013–14 OFC Champions League - Oceania". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  47. ^ "2014–15 OFC Champions League - Oceania". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  48. ^ "2016 OFC Champions League - Oceania". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  49. ^ "2017 OFC Champions League - Oceania". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  50. ^ "2018 OFC Champions League - Oceania". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  51. ^ "2019 OFC Champions League - Oceania". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  52. ^ "2020 OFC Champions League - Oceania". Soccerway. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  53. ^ Voerman, Andrew (29 April 2018). "Team Wellington end Auckland City's Oceania reign, advance to Champions League final". Stuff. Retrieved 13 April 2021.
  54. ^ "OFC Champions League 2020 cancelled". Oceania Football Confederation. 4 September 2020. Retrieved 13 April 2021.
  55. ^ "Auckland City FC withdraw from FIFA Club World Cup™". FIFA.com. 15 January 2021. Retrieved 15 January 2021.
  56. ^ "Premiership concluded, Auckland City champions". New Zealand Football. 18 March 2020. Archived from the original on 4 June 2020. Retrieved 20 May 2020.
  57. ^ "Auckland City FC declared champions". Auckland City FC. 18 March 2020.

External linksEdit