Oceania Football Confederation

The Oceania Football Confederation (OFC) is one of the six continental confederations of international association football. The OFC has 13 members, 11 of which are full members and two which are associate members not affiliated with FIFA. It promotes the game in Oceania and allows the member nations to qualify for the FIFA World Cup.

Oceania Football Confederation
AbbreviationOFC
Formation1966; 58 years ago (1966)
TypeSports organisation
HeadquartersAuckland, New Zealand
Region served
Oceania
Membership
13 member associations (11 full)
Official language
English
Lambert Maltock
Vice Presidents
Thierry Ariiotima
Kapi Natto John
Lord Ve'ehala
General Secretary
Franck Castillo
Parent organization
FIFA
Websiteoceaniafootball.com

OFC is predominantly made up of island nations where association football is not the most popular sport, with low GDP and low population meaning very little money is generated by the OFC nations. The OFC has little influence in the wider football world, either in terms of international competition or as a source of players for high-profile club competitions. OFC is the only confederation to have not had at least one international title, the best result being Australia making the final of the 1997 FIFA Confederations Cup.

In 2006, the OFC's then largest and most successful nation, Australia, left for a second time to join the Asian Football Confederation, leaving New Zealand as the largest federation within the OFC.

The President of OFC is Lambert Maltock since April 2018. The Vice Presidents are Thierry Ariiotima, Kapi Natto John and Lord Ve'ehala while Franck Castillo is the General Secretary.[1] The confederation is headquartered in Auckland, New Zealand.

History edit

The confederation formed in 1966, as a result of Australia and New Zealand's failed attempts to join the Asian Football Confederation (AFC).[2] The founding OFC members were the following:[3]

Australia resigned as an OFC member in 1972 to again pursue membership with the AFC, but rejoined the OFC in 1978.[4][5] Their men's national team (nicknamed the Socceroos) became the first Oceanians to play at a FIFA World Cup in 1974, being drawn in the same group as Chile, East Germany and West Germany. They failed to score a goal, but were still competitive in all three of their matches.[6] New Zealand's national team the All Whites played in their first World Cup eight years later. At the 1982 tournament they suffered heavier defeats than Australia previously had.[7]

Chinese Taipei was an OFC member from 1975 to 1989. In 1996, FIFA confirmed OFC as a full confederation and granted it a seat on the FIFA executive.[8] In 1998 the OFC unveiled a new logo and an official magazine, entitled The Wave. Australia meanwhile lost several inter-confederation World Cup playoffs; first to Scotland in 1985, then Argentina in 1993 and then Iran in 1997.[9]

Australia's national team were long considered the biggest challenge in Oceania.[10] There were many highly uncompetitive matches involving them, particularly in the 1990s and 2000s. Their June 1997 second round qualification games for the 1998 FIFA World Cup included a 13–0 defeat of the Solomon Islands.[11] The following year they defeated the Cook Islands 16–0 at the 1998 OFC Nations Cup, while at the 2000 OFC Nations Cup they defeated them 17–0.[12][13] The uncompetitive results escalated in April 2001, during the first round of OFC qualifiers for the 2002 FIFA World Cup. Australia beat Tonga 22–0, following this result up with a 31–0 win over American Samoa and an 11–0 win over Samoa.[14][15] The American Samoa game became the largest international victory in the history of the sport (breaking the previous record set in the Tonga game),[16] while Archie Thompson also broke the record for most goals in an international match, scoring 13.

Australia's record-breaking form in the early stages of qualifying ultimately couldn't be replicated in their inter-confederation playoff against Uruguay later that year. For the first leg, the Socceroos managed to defeat the South Americans 1–0 in front of a Melbourne crowd of 84,656, but they were overwhelmed 3–0 in the away leg. The away leg was marred by an incident at Montevideo's airport prior to the game itself, where the Australian players were spat on, punched and abused by a mob of Uruguayan fans.[17] On 24 May 2004, New Caledonia became the 12th member of the OFC.

Australia reached another inter-confederation playoff against Uruguay in 2005. Both sides won a game each over the two legs, which led to Australia finally ending their World Cup drought through a dramatic penalty shootout in Sydney. The Socceroos were granted increased security for the first away leg, as a response to the 2001 airport incident, and in the second leg the Uruguayan team were heavily booed while their national anthem played.[18] In the 2006 FIFA World Cup, Australia were eliminated by Italy during the Round of 16.[19] Their 3–1 group stage victory against Japan remains the only time a team representing OFC has won at the tournament. Australia left the OFC again that same year and joined the Asian Football Confederation.

In 2008, an associate member, the Northern Mariana Islands Football Association, also left the OFC and in 2009 joined the AFC as an associate member. In late 2009, the Palau Football Association, geographically a part of Oceania but with no official ties to the OFC, also applied for the same status with the AFC as the Northern Mariana Islands association but was not successful.[20] New Zealand ended their own World Cup drought in 2009 when they defeated Bahrain to qualify for the 2010 FIFA World Cup. The tournament coincidentally also featured Australia, who were now representing the AFC. New Zealand were the only unbeaten team at the tournament, despite failing to advance past the group stage.[21] With Australia's absence, New Zealand now have a regular presence in World Cup inter-confederation playoffs. They were convincingly defeated by Mexico over two legs in 2013, and narrowly missed out to Peru in 2017[22] and Costa Rica in 2022.[23][24]

Criticism edit

Throughout its history, there have been numerous calls to either merge the OFC and AFC, or dissolve the OFC and have its members join the AFC, in order to form an Asia-Pacific Football Confederation.

The calls grew louder in 2003 when FIFA reversed a decision to grant Oceania an automatic spot at the World Cup.[25] Australia's lack of World Cup participation prior to 2006 has been blamed by many on the OFC qualification process, with football writer Matthew Hall stating in 2003, "For World Cup qualification, the Socceroos will win games by cricket scores and then face a sudden-death play-off against a desperate, battle-hardened opponent given a second, or even third, life."[25]

Presidents edit

Current leaders edit

Name Position
  Lambert Maltock President
  Thierry Ariiotima Vice President
  Kapi Natto John Vice President
  Lord Ve'ehala Vice President
  Franck Castillo General Secretary

Source:[26][27]

Member nations edit

Current members edit

OFC is made up of 11 full member associations and 2 associate members. Those two are associate members of the OFC, but are not FIFA members.[28]

Code Association National teams Founded Membership FIFA
affiliation
OFC
affiliation
IOC
member
Note
ASA   American Samoa (M, W) 1984 Full 1998 1998 Yes [Note 1]
COK   Cook Islands (M, W) 1971 Full 1994 1994 Yes [Note 2]
FIJ   Fiji (M, W) 1938 Full 1964 1966 Yes
KIR   Kiribati (M, W) 1980 Associate 2007 Yes
NCL   New Caledonia (M, W) 1928 Full 2004 1999 No [Note 3]
NZL   New Zealand (M, W) 1891 Full 1948 1966 Yes
PNG   Papua New Guinea (M, W) 1962 Full 1966 1966 Yes
SAM   Samoa (M, W) 1968 Full 1986 1986 Yes
SOL   Solomon Islands (M, W) 1979 Full 1988 1988 Yes
TAH   Tahiti (M, W) 1989 Full 1990 1990 No [Note 4]
TGA   Tonga (M, W) 1965 Full 1994 1994 Yes
TUV   Tuvalu (M, W) 1979 Associate 2006 Yes
VAN   Vanuatu (M, W) 1934 Full 1988 1988 Yes

Notes edit

Possible future members edit

  •   Autonomous Region of Bougainville: The Autonomous Region of Bougainville is set to gain full independence from Papua New Guinea by 2027. The president of the Bougainville Football Federation, Justin Helele, expressed the association's desire to join FIFA and, presumably, the OFC.[29] FIFA has already begun funding projects in the territory.[30] The Melanesian region has also participated in OFC projects and has received funding from the confederation since at least 2012. That year the OFC began youth football programs.[31] The next year, the OFC helped fund the creation of a football academy in Bougainville.[32][33]
  •   Federated States of Micronesia: The Federated States of Micronesia were announced as new associate members of the OFC following the 2006 Extraordinary Congress. It is unclear when they were removed from the association.[34] In 2010 the Federated States of Micronesia Football Association submitted an application to the East Asian Football Federation in hopes of taking the steps to join FIFA. However, the application was not successful. In 2017 Englishman Paul Watson who was connected to the association said, "I think it's starting to look like Micronesia is best off looking to Oceania rather than Asia. I don't see any reason why they shouldn't get into OFC within the next year or two, but it'll all depend on the people inside the organization."[35] The FSMFA reformed in 2023 and identified gaining membership in the AFC or OFC and FIFA as a main priority.[36] In a July 2023 interview with the Daily Mirror, association President Brian Southwick stated that the goal was to join the OFC because of the level of competition and proximity to other members.[37]
  •   Marshall Islands: The Marshall Islands Soccer Association was created in 2020. The organization's goal is to join the regional and world governing bodies "in the coming years."[38] The association has indicated that the nation may field a first-ever Marshall Islands national soccer team at the 2023 Micronesian Games hosted by the country.[39]
  •   Nauru: Nauru is one of the few fully-sovereign nations that is not a member of FIFA or a regional confederation.[40] The Nauru Soccer Federation has reportedly applied for membership in both the OFC and FIFA but was denied.[41] In 2009 the Nauruan Minister of Sport Rayong Itsimaera indicated that there were challenges preventing them from joining both bodies, presumably the lack of a league system and a preference for Australian rules football by the population.[42] Nauru has been participating in some OFC initiatives since at least 2020.[43] In 2023 the federation was relaunched under the auspices of the Nauru Olympic Committee with the stated purpose of fielding a national team and joining the OFC and FIFA.[44]
  •   Niue: Niue is a former associate member of the OFC. Following the Niue Island Soccer Association's removal from the OFC and its subsequent disbandment in 2021, an OFC official indicated that they were aware of the formation of the new Niue Football Association and encourages its application for associate membership.[45]
  •   Palau: The Palau Football Association has been a member of the OFC in the past, being announced as a new member at the organization's 2006 Extraordinary Congress, alongside the Federated States of Micronesia.[34] In 2009 the association asked to join the East Asian Football Federation, a sub-regional body under the Asian Football Confederation.[46]

Several other sovereign states, associated states, dependencies, and territories in Oceania, including members of the United Nations, have no affiliations to confederations. Some play infrequently while others have been inactive for several years. There are also some which do not have a national team at all.

Former members edit

Association Membership Year
  Australia Full 1966–1972, 1978–2006[47]
  Chinese Taipei Full 1976–1978, 1982–1989
  Micronesia Associate 2006–???[34]
  Niue Associate 2006–2021[48]
  Northern Mariana Islands Associate 1998–2009
  Palau Associate 2006–???[34]

Note edit

Israel entered the FIFA World Cup OFC qualifying tournaments in 1986 and 1990 due to political reasons, though it was never an OFC member.

Non-members edit

AFC Members edit

Three associations are geographically in Oceania but not affiliated with the OFC but are instead members of the Asian Football Confederation:

CONIFA Members edit

Three CONIFA members are geographically in Oceania but not affiliated with the OFC nor FIFA as they do not meet membership requirements:

Competitions edit

National teams edit

Men's

Women's

League edit

The OFC Professional League is a region-wide league currently being planned for an inaugural season in 2025 with support from FIFA.[49]

Clubs edit

Men's

Women's

Former tournaments edit

Clubs

Current title holders edit

Competition Year Champions Title Runners-up Next edition
National teams
Nations Cup 2016 (final)   New Zealand 5th   Papua New Guinea 2024 (final)
Pacific Games 2023   New Caledonia 1st   Solomon Islands 2027
OFC Men's Olympic Qualifying Tournament 2023   New Zealand 5th   Fiji 2027
U-19/U-20 Championship 2022   New Zealand 8th   Fiji 2024
U-18 Youth Development Tournament 2019   India 1st   Tahiti TBD
U-16/U-17 Championship 2023   New Zealand 9th   New Caledonia 2024
U-15 Youth Development Tournament 2023   Tahiti 1st   Fiji TBD
Futsal Nations Cup 2023   New Zealand 2nd   Tahiti 2024
Youth Futsal Tournament 2017   Solomon Islands 1st   New Zealand TBD
Beach Soccer Nations Cup 2023   Tahiti 3rd   Solomon Islands 2023
National teams (women)
Women's Nations Cup 2022 (final)   Papua New Guinea 1st   Fiji 2026 (final)
Pacific Games 2019   Papua New Guinea 5th   Samoa 2023
U-19/U20 Women's Championship 2023   New Zealand 8th   Fiji 2025
U-16/U17 Women's Championship 2023   New Zealand 5th   Fiji 2025
Youth Futsal women's tournament 2017   New Zealand 1st   Tonga TBD
Club teams
Champions League 2023 (final)   Auckland City 11th   Suva 2024 (final)
Futsal Champions League 2019 (final)   Kooline 1st   AS PTT 2022 (final)
Club teams (women)
Women's Champions League 2023   AS Academy 1st   Hekari United 2024 (final)

FIFA World Rankings edit

Overview edit

Historical leaders edit

Men's
New Zealand men's national football teamNew Caledonia national football teamFiji national football teamNew Zealand men's national football team

Team of the Year edit

Team ranking in the top four - Men's[50]
Year First Second Third Fourth
2022   New Zealand   Solomon Islands   Papua New Guinea   New Caledonia
2021   New Zealand   Solomon Islands   New Caledonia   Tahiti
2020   New Zealand   Solomon Islands   New Caledonia   Tahiti
2019   New Zealand   Solomon Islands   New Caledonia   Tahiti
2018   New Zealand   Solomon Islands   New Caledonia   Tahiti
2017   New Zealand   Solomon Islands   Tahiti   New Caledonia
2016   New Zealand   Tahiti   New Caledonia   Papua New Guinea
2015   New Zealand   American Samoa   Cook Islands   Samoa
2014   New Zealand   New Caledonia   Tahiti   Solomon Islands
2013   New Zealand   New Caledonia   Tahiti   Solomon Islands
2012   New Zealand   New Caledonia   Tahiti   Solomon Islands
2011   New Zealand   Samoa   Fiji   New Caledonia
2010   New Zealand   Fiji   New Caledonia   Vanuatu
2009   New Zealand   Fiji   New Caledonia   Vanuatu
2008   New Zealand   Fiji   New Caledonia   Vanuatu
2007   New Zealand   New Caledonia   Solomon Islands   Fiji
2006   New Zealand   Fiji   Solomon Islands   Vanuatu
2005   New Zealand   Fiji   Solomon Islands   Tahiti
2004   New Zealand   Tahiti   Solomon Islands   Fiji
2003   New Zealand   Tahiti   Fiji   Solomon Islands
2002   New Zealand   Tahiti   Fiji   Solomon Islands
2001   New Zealand   Fiji   Tahiti   Solomon Islands
2000   New Zealand   Solomon Islands   Tahiti   Fiji
1999   New Zealand   Fiji   Tahiti   Solomon Islands
1998   New Zealand   Tahiti   Fiji   Solomon Islands
1997   New Zealand   Solomon Islands   Fiji   Tahiti
1996   New Zealand   Fiji   Tahiti   Tonga
1995   New Zealand   Fiji   Tahiti   Solomon Islands
1994   New Zealand   Fiji   Tahiti   Solomon Islands
1993   New Zealand   Fiji   Tahiti   Solomon Islands
Team ranking in the top four - Women's[citation needed]
Year First Second Third Fourth
2022   New Zealand   Papua New Guinea   Fiji   Tonga
2021   New Zealand   Papua New Guinea   Fiji   Tonga
2020   New Zealand   Papua New Guinea   Fiji   Tonga
2019   New Zealand   Papua New Guinea   Fiji   Tonga
2018   New Zealand   Papua New Guinea   Fiji   Tonga
2017   New Zealand      
2016   New Zealand   Papua New Guinea   Fiji   Tonga
2015   New Zealand   Papua New Guinea   Fiji   Tonga
2014   New Zealand   Papua New Guinea   Tonga   Cook Islands
2013   New Zealand      
2012   New Zealand   Papua New Guinea   Tonga   Fiji
2011   New Zealand   Papua New Guinea   Tonga   Fiji
2010   New Zealand   Papua New Guinea   Tonga   Fiji
2009   New Zealand      
2008   New Zealand   Papua New Guinea   Tonga   Fiji
2007   New Zealand   Papua New Guinea   Tonga   Fiji
2006   Australia   New Zealand   Tonga   Papua New Guinea
2005   Australia   New Zealand   Tonga   Papua New Guinea
2004   Australia   New Zealand   Tonga   Papua New Guinea
2003   Australia   New Zealand   Tonga   Papua New Guinea

Major tournament records edit

Legend
  •  1st  – Champion
  •  2nd  – Runner-up
  •  3rd  – Third place
  •  4th  – Fourth place
  • QF – Quarter-finals (1934–1938, 1954–1970, and 1986–present: knockout round of 8)
  • R2 – Round 2 (1974–1978, second group stage, top 8; 1982: second group stage, top 12; 1986–2022: knockout round of 16)
  • R1 – Round 1 (1930, 1950–1970 and 1986–present: group stage; 1934–1938: knockout round of 16; 1974–1982: first group stage)
  •    — Did not qualify
  •  ×  — Did not enter / withdrawn / banned / disqualified
  •     — Hosts

For each tournament, the flag of the host country and the number of teams in each finals tournament (in brackets) are shown.

FIFA World Cup edit

Oceania has sent representatives to the FIFA World Cup four times: Australia in 1974 and 2006, and New Zealand in 1982 and 2010. Of these, only Australia in 2006 progressed beyond the first round.

The OFC is the only FIFA confederation that does not have a guaranteed spot in the World Cup finals (a major reason for the Australians leaving the confederation in 2006 to join Asia). Between 1966 and 1982, OFC teams joined the Asian zone qualification tournament, while from 1986 onwards, the winners of the Oceanian zone qualification tournament have to enter the intercontinental play-offs against teams from other confederations in order to gain a spot in the FIFA World Cup.

Beginning in 2026, the OFC will have a guaranteed spot in the FIFA World Cup for the first time in history, result of the competition's expansion from 32 to 48 teams.

FIFA World Cup record
Team 1930
 
(13)
1934
 
(16)
1938
 
(15)
1950
 
(13)
1954
 
(16)
1958
 
(16)
1962
 
(16)
1966
 
(16)
1970
 
(16)
1974
 
(16)
1978
 
(16)
1982
 
(24)
1986
 
(24)
1990
 
(24)
1994
 
(24)
1998
 
(32)
2002
 
 
(32)
2006
 
(32)
2010
 
(32)
2014
 
(32)
2018
 
(32)
2022
 
(32)
2026
 
 
 
(48)
Years inclusive
WC Qual.
OFC qualifier[52] 1966 1970 1974 1978 1982 1986 1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 2010 2014 2018 2022 2026
  Australia R1 R2 Part of AFC 2 11
  New Zealand × × × × × R1 R1 2 14
Total (2 teams) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 TBD 4
FIFA World Cup record
Year Qualifier Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Format
1930
 
(13)
No teams from Oceania entered
1934
 
(16)
1938
 
(15)
1950
 
(13)
1954
 
(16)
1958
 
(16)
1962
 
(16)
1966
 
(16)
No OFC team qualified Entered in Africa and Asia
1970
 
(16)
Entered in Asia
1974
 
(16)
  Australia Group stage 14th 3 0 1 2 0 5 Entered in Asia
1978
 
(16)
No OFC team qualified Entered in Asia
1982
 
(24)
  New Zealand Group stage 23rd 3 0 0 3 2 12 Entered in Asia
1986
 
(24)
No OFC team qualified Round-robin
Play-off
1990
 
(24)
First round
Second round
Play-off
1994
 
(24)
First round
Second round
1st play-off
2nd play-off
1998
 
(32)
First round
Second round
Third round
Play-off
2002
 
 
(32)
First round
Second round
Play-off
2006
 
(32)
  Australia Round of 16 16th 4 1 1 2 5 6 First round
Second round
Third round
Play-off
2010
 
(32)
  New Zealand Group stage 22nd 3 0 3 0 2 2 First round
Second round
Play-off
2014
 
(32)
No OFC team qualified First round
Second round
Third round
Play-off
2018
 
(32)
First round
Second round
Third round
Play-off
2022
 
(32)
2022 FIFA World Cup qualification (OFC)
Play-off
2026
 
 
 
(48)
To be determined 2026 FIFA World Cup qualification (OFC)
Play-off
Total (2 teams) 4/23 Round of 16 14th 13 1 5 7 9 25

OFC play-off record edit

1970 AFC–OFC Final Round

Team 1 Agg.Tooltip Aggregate score Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Israel   2–1   Australia 1–0 1–1

1974 AFC–OFC Final Round

Team 1 Agg.Tooltip Aggregate score Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Australia   (A) 2–2   South Korea 0–0 2–2

1986 UEFA–OFC play-off

Team 1 Agg.Tooltip Aggregate score Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Scotland   2–0   Australia 2–0 0–0

1990 CONMEBOL–OFC play-off

Team 1 Agg.Tooltip Aggregate score Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Colombia   1–0   Israel 1–0 0–0

Israel played in the OFC zone for political reasons.

1994 CONCACAF–OFC play-off

Team 1 Agg.Tooltip Aggregate score Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Canada   3–3 (P)   Australia 2–1 1–2

1994 CONMEBOL–OFC play-off

Team 1 Agg.Tooltip Aggregate score Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Australia   1–2   Argentina 1–1 0–1

1998 AFC–OFC play-off

Team 1 Agg.Tooltip Aggregate score Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Iran   (A) 3–3   Australia 1–1 2–2

2002 CONMEBOL–OFC play-off

Team 1 Agg.Tooltip Aggregate score Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Australia   1–3   Uruguay 1–0 0–3

2006 CONMEBOL–OFC play-off

Team 1 Agg.Tooltip Aggregate score Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Uruguay   1–1 (P)   Australia 1–0 0–1

2010 AFC–OFC play-off

Team 1 Agg.Tooltip Aggregate score Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Bahrain   0–1   New Zealand 0–0 0–1

2014 CONCACAF–OFC play-off

Team 1 Agg.Tooltip Aggregate score Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Mexico   9–3   New Zealand 5–1 4–2

2018 CONMEBOL–OFC play-off

Team 1 Agg.Tooltip Aggregate score Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
New Zealand   0–2   Peru 0–0 0–2

2022 CONCACAF–OFC play-off

Team 1  Score  Team 2
Costa Rica   1–0   New Zealand

FIFA Women's World Cup edit

FIFA Women's World Cup record
Team 1991
 
(12)
1995
 
(12)
1999
 
(16)
2003
 
(16)
2007
 
(16)
2011
 
(16)
2015
 
(24)
2019
 
(24)
2023
 
 
(32)
Years inclusive
W. WC Qual.
  Australia R1 R1 R1 Part of AFC 3 4
  New Zealand R1 R1 R1 R1 R1 R1 6 8
Total (2 teams) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9 12

Olympic Games For Men edit

Olympic Games (Men's tournament) record
Team
Total (3 teams)
1900
 
(3)
1904
 
(3)
1908
 
(6)
1912
 
(11)
1920
 
(14)
1924
 
(22)
1928
 
(17)
1936
 
(16)
1948
 
(18)
1952
 
(25)
1956
 
(11)
1960
 
(16)
1964
 
(14)
1968
 
(16)
1972
 
(16)
1976
 
(13)
1980
 
(16)
1984
 
(16)
1988
 
(16)
1992
 
(16)
1996
 
(16)
2000
 
(16)
2004
 
(16)
2008
 
(16)
2012
 
(16)
2016
 
(16)
2020
 
(16)
2024
 
(16)
Years
  Australia × × × × × × × × × × QF × × × × × × × QF 4th GS GS QF Part of AFC 6
  Fiji × × × × × × × × × × × × × × × × × × × GS 1
  New Zealand × × × × × × × × × × × × × × × × × GS GS QF Q 4

Olympic Games For Women edit

Olympic Games (Women's tournament) record
Team
Total (2 teams)
1996
 
(8)
2000
 
(8)
2004
 
(10)
2008
 
(12)
2012
 
(12)
2016
 
(12)
2020
 
(12)
2024
 
(12)
Years
  Australia GS QF Part of AFC 2
  New Zealand GS QF GS GS 4

OFC Nations Cup edit

OFC Nations Cup record
Team
(Total 15 teams)
1973
 
(5)
1980
 
(8)
1996
 
(4)
1998
 
(6)
2000
 
(6)
2002
 
(8)
2004
 
(6)
2008
 
(4)
2012
 
(8)
2016
 
(8)
2024
 
(8)
Years
  New Zealand 1st GS SF 1st 2nd 1st 3rd 1st 3rd 1st Q 10
  Tahiti 2nd 2nd 2nd 4th GS 3rd 5th 1st GS Q 9
  Vanuatu[a] 4th GS GS 4th 4th 6th 4th GS GS Q 9
  Fiji 5th 4th 3rd •• GS 4th 3rd GS GS Q 8
  Solomon Islands × GS SF 3rd GS 2nd 4th SF Q 7
  Australia × 1st 1st 2nd 1st 2nd 1st Member of AFC 6
  New Caledonia 3rd 3rd GS 2nd 2nd SF Q 6
  Papua New Guinea × GS GS × GS 2nd Q 4
  Cook Islands × × × GS GS × 2
  Samoa[b] × × GS GS 2
  American Samoa × × × 0
  Tonga × × 0
  Tuvalu × × × × × × × × × × 0
  Kiribati × × × × × × × × × × × 0
  Niue × × × × × × × × × × × 0
  1. ^ Includes results as New Hebrides.
  2. ^ Includes results as Western Samoa.

OFC Women's Nations Cup edit

OFC Women's Nations Cup record
Team
(Total 15 teams)
1983
 
(4)
1986
 
(4)
1989
 
(5)
1991
 
(3)
1994
 
(3)
1998
 
(6)
2003
 
(5)
2007
 
(4)
2010
 
(8)
2014
 
(4)
2018
 
(8)
2022
 
(9)
Years
  New Zealand 1st 3rd 2nd 1st 2nd 2nd 2nd 1st 1st 1st 1st × 11
  Papua New Guinea × 5th 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 2nd 2nd 2nd 3rd q 9
  Australia[a] 2nd 2nd 3rd[b] 2nd 1st 1st 1st Member of AFC 7
  Cook Islands 5th × 3rd 3rd GS QF 5
  Fiji 4th 4th × × GS 2nd q 4
  Tonga × 3rd GS 4th GS QF 5
  Samoa GS 4th × GS q 3
  Chinese Taipei[a] 1st 1st Member of AFC 2
  New Caledonia 3rd[c] × 4th QF 3
  Solomon Islands 4th 4th q 2
  Tahiti × × GS GS QF 3
  American Samoa GS × × 1
  Australia B[a][d] 4th[b] Member of AFC 1
  New Zealand B[d] 4th 1
  Vanuatu × × GS GS 2

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Former OFC member, but now a member of the Asian Football Confederation.
  2. ^ a b The third place play-off scheduled to take place between Australia and Australia B was cancelled due to waterlogged pitch, so their group standings are used.
  3. ^ New Caledonia participated and hosted the tournament in 1983, but were not a member of the OFC or FIFA until 2004.
  4. ^ a b Secondary national team.

FIFA U-20 World Cup edit

FIFA U-20 World Cup record
Team 1977
 
(16)
1979
 
(16)
1981
 
(16)
1983
 
(16)
1985
 
(16)
1987
 
(16)
1989
 
(16)
1991
 
(16)
1993
 
(16)
1995
 
(16)
1997
 
(24)
1999
 
(24)
2001
 
(24)
2003
 
(24)
2005
 
(24)
2007
 
(24)
2009
 
(24)
2011
 
(24)
2013
 
(24)
2015
 
(24)
2017
 
(24)
2019
 
(24)
2023
 
(24)
Years
  Australia[a] QF R1 R1 R1 4th 4th QF R2 R1 R2 R2 R1 Part of AFC 12
  Fiji R1 R1 2
  New Zealand R1 R1 R1 R2 R2 R2 R2 7
  Tahiti R1 R1 2
  Vanuatu R1 1
Total (5 teams) 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 24
  1. ^ Australia represented OFC before 2006.

FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup edit

FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup record
Team 2002
 
(12)
2004
 
(12)
2006
 
(16)
2008
 
(16)
2010
 
(16)
2012
 
(16)
2014
 
(16)
2016
 
(16)
2018
 
(16)
2022
 
(16)
Years
  Australia QF QF GS Part of AFC 3
  New Zealand GS GS GS GS QF GS GS GS 8
  Papua New Guinea GS 1
Total (3 teams) 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 12

FIFA U-17 World Cup edit

FIFA U-17 World Cup record
Team 1985
 
(16)
1987
 
(16)
1989
 
(16)
1991
 
(16)
1993
 
(16)
1995
 
(16)
1997
 
(16)
1999
 
(16)
2001
 
(16)
2003
 
(16)
2005
 
(16)
2007
 
(24)
2009
 
(24)
2011
 
(24)
2013
 
(24)
2015
 
(24)
2017
 
(24)
2019
 
(24)
2023
 
(24)
Years
  Australia QF QF R1 QF QF QF 2nd QF R1 R1 Part of AFC 10
  New Caledonia R1 R1 2
  New Zealand R1 R1 R1 R2 R2 R1 R2 R1 R1 R1 10
  Solomon Islands R1 1
Total (4 teams) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 23

FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup edit

FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup record
Team 2008
 
(16)
2010
 
(16)
2012
 
(16)
2014
 
(16)
2016
 
(16)
2018
 
(16)
2022
 
(16)
2024
 
(16)
Years
  New Zealand R1 R1 R1 GS GS 3rd GS q 7
Total (1 team) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7

FIFA Futsal World Cup edit

FIFA Futsal World Cup record
Team 1989
 
(16)
1992
 
(16)
1996
 
(16)
2000
 
(16)
2004
 
(16)
2008
 
(20)
2012
 
(24)
2016
 
(24)
2021
 
(24)
2024
 
(24)
Years
  Australia R1 R1 R1 R1 R1 Part of AFC 5
  New Zealand Q 1
  Solomon Islands R1 R1 R1 R1 4
Total (3 teams) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 10

FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup edit

FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup record
Team 2005[†]
 
(12)
2006
 
(16)
2007
 
(16)
2008[†]
 
(16)
2009
 
(16)
2011
 
(16)
2013
 
(16)
2015[†]
 
(16)
2017[†]
 
(16)
2019
 
(16)
2021
 
(16)
2024
 
(16)
2025
 
(16)
Years
  Australia R1 Part of AFC 1
  Solomon Islands R1 R1 R1 R1 R1 5
  Tahiti R1 4th 2nd 2nd R1 QF Q 7
Total (3 teams) 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 13
Notes
  1. ^
    In 2005, 2008, 2015 and 2017, no OFC qualifiers for the FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup were held and teams were selected to represent OFC (2005: Australia; 2008: Solomon Islands; 2015 and 2017: Tahiti).

Former tournaments edit

FIFA Confederations Cup edit

FIFA Confederations Cup record
Team 1992
 
(4)
1995
 
(6)
1997
 
(8)
1999
 
(8)
2001
 
 
(8)
2003
 
(8)
2005
 
(8)
2009
 
(8)
2013
 
(8)
2017
 
(8)
Years
  Australia[note 1] × × 2nd 3rd GS Part of AFC 3
  New Zealand × × GS GS GS GS 4
  Tahiti × × GS 1
Total (3 teams) 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8
Notes
  1. ^ Australia was an OFC member until 2005, and played three times in the FIFA Confederations Cup as an OFC member (1997, 2001, 2005). They became an AFC member in 2006, and qualified in the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup as an AFC member.

See also edit

References edit

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  2. ^ "Sh - Ofc". Sportshistory.club. Retrieved 19 January 2022.
  3. ^ A Dictionary of Sports Studies. ISBN 019921381X.
  4. ^ OFC History oceaniafootball.com
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  6. ^ "Soccer: Australia upbeat despite loss to Brazil". New Zealand Herald. 16 August 2023.
  7. ^ "All Whites' results". nzhistory.govt.nz.
  8. ^ "FIFA Congress". FIFA. Archived from the original on 1 July 2013. Retrieved 14 March 2017.
  9. ^ "World Cup play-offs to be one-off ties". 19 November 2021.
  10. ^ "Looking back: The OFC Nations Cup 2002". 13 July 2020.
  11. ^ "Results, Oceanian Zone". FIFA. Archived from the original on 14 October 2007. Retrieved 19 January 2022.
  12. ^ "Oceanian Nations Cup 1998".
  13. ^ "Oceanian Nations Cup 2000".
  14. ^ "Only eleven for the Aussies this time". The Irish Times.
  15. ^ "Watch: Australia 31-0 American Samoa, 20 years on". Socceroos. 11 April 2021. Retrieved 19 January 2022.
  16. ^ "American Samoa finally get 17-year monkey off their back". Irish Independent.
  17. ^ "Socceroos promised blanket security". 10 November 2005.
  18. ^ Baum, Greg (18 November 2005). "The other, two-faced Australia". The Age.
  19. ^ "Subscribe to The Australian | Newspaper home delivery, website, iPad, iPhone & Android apps".
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  21. ^ "Beautiful outcomes at ugly Cup". Stuff. 30 December 2010.
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  23. ^ Winehouse, Amitai. "Costa Rica qualify for 2022 World Cup". The Athletic. Retrieved 17 October 2022.
  24. ^ "Hay quits as New Zealand coach after World Cup miss". Reuters. 11 October 2022. Retrieved 17 October 2022.
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  26. ^ "Football Confederations - OFC". FIFA. Archived from the original on 21 March 2019. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
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  33. ^ "Bougainville football on track". Oceania Football Confederation. Retrieved 8 January 2023.
  34. ^ a b c d "OFC CELEBRATES 40th ANNIVERSARY AT CONGRESS". Oceania Football Confederation. Retrieved 8 January 2023.
  35. ^ Murray, Trevor. "MEET POHNPEI, THE PACIFIC ISLANDERS BATTLING TO BECOME FIFA'S 212TH MEMBER". These Football Times. Retrieved 7 January 2023.
  36. ^ Jaynes, Bill. "Yap team takes first place at historic first ever FSM National Futsal Championship". The Kaselehlie Press. Retrieved 29 September 2023.
  37. ^ "Inside tiny islands clinging to World Cup dreams despite FIFA not recognising them". mirror.co.uk. Tom Victor. 7 July 2023. Retrieved 9 July 2023.
  38. ^ "MISF Official website". Marshall Islans Soccer Federation. Retrieved 6 January 2023.
  39. ^ Ewart, Richard. "Small beginnings as Marshall Islands sets out to join the world soccer family". ABC. Retrieved 6 January 2023.
  40. ^ "Countries in Europe Without an Official FIFA Football Team – Part 1". Young Pioneers Tours. Retrieved 30 July 2021.
  41. ^ Düerkop, Sascha. "The Associate Members of OFC – 0:3 for football". Football in Oceania. Retrieved 30 July 2021.
  42. ^ Menary, Steve. "Micronesia is struggling to keep the game afloat". World Soccer. Retrieved 30 July 2021.
  43. ^ "Team Up launches across the Pacific". Oceania Football Confederation. Retrieved 20 August 2021.
  44. ^ "About the Nauro Soccer Federation". Nauru Soccer Federation. Retrieved 22 September 2023.
  45. ^ Pavihi, Ester. "NISA calls special meeting to discuss the removal of OFC membership and way forward for soccer in Niue". tvniue.com. Retrieved 12 November 2021.
  46. ^ "Regarding the agenda/ decisions of the 29th EAFF Executive Committee Meeting". East Asian Football Federation. Retrieved 8 January 2023.
  47. ^ "Oceania Football Confederation – Content". Oceania Football Confederation. 6 October 2009. Archived from the original on 3 March 2009. Retrieved 14 March 2017.
  48. ^ "Niue removed as associate member of Oceania Football". Radio NZ International. 6 March 2021.
  49. ^ "OFC Home of Football opens its doors". FIFA. Retrieved 30 December 2022.
  50. ^ a b "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking". FIFA. 15 February 2024. Retrieved 15 February 2024.
  51. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 15 December 2023. Retrieved 15 December 2023.
  52. ^ Between the editions from 1966 to 1982, teams from Oceania played the qualifiers together with the Asian teams (they also played together with the African teams, but only in the 1966 edition).

External links edit