2023 FIFA U-20 World Cup

The 2023 FIFA U-20 World Cup was the 23rd edition of the FIFA U-20 World Cup, the biennial international men's youth football championship contested by the under-20 national teams of the member associations of FIFA, since its inception in 1977 as the FIFA World Youth Championship. The official match ball used in the tournament was Adidas Oceaunz.

2023 FIFA U-20 World Cup
Copa Mundial Sub-20 de la FIFA 2023
Tournament details
Host countryArgentina
Dates20 May – 11 June[1]
Teams24 (from 6 confederations)
Venue(s)4 (in 4 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Uruguay (1st title)
Runners-up Italy
Third place Israel
Fourth place South Korea
Tournament statistics
Matches played52
Goals scored154 (2.96 per match)
Attendance692,084 (13,309 per match)
Top scorer(s)Italy Cesare Casadei
(7 goals)[2]
Best player(s)Italy Cesare Casadei[2]
Best goalkeeperItaly Sebastiano Desplanches[2]
Fair play award United States[2]
2025

The tournament was held in Argentina, who had previously hosted in 2001. Indonesia had originally been set to host the competition, having been hosts of the cancelled 2021 edition, but their hosting rights were stripped on 29 March 2023 due to their refusal to host Israel.

Reigning champions Ukraine could not defend their title as they failed to qualify. Hosts Argentina were knocked out in the round of 16 after three wins in the group stage following a two-nil loss to Nigeria. The final was held on 11 June 2023, and Uruguay defeated Italy to become champions for the first time. It was the country's first world title since the men's senior in the 1950 FIFA World Cup.

Host selection edit

Five bids to host the original 2021 tournament were submitted in 2019,[3] and Indonesia was announced as the winning bidder on 24 October 2019.[4] In December 2020, the 2021 event was postponed until 2023, with Indonesia remaining as host.[5]

However, Indonesia was stripped of hosting rights on 29 March 2023 due to its refusal to bring the Israel U-20 national team in.[6] Peru, Argentina and Qatar confirmed their interest in hosting the tournament.[7] On 30 March, Argentina became the only country to submit an official bid.[8][9]

On 17 April 2023, at a press conference jointly held by economy minister Sergio Massa, tourism and sports minister Matías Lammens, and the president of the Argentine Football Association (AFA), Claudio Tapia, it was announced that Argentina would host the tournament,[10] followed shortly after by a statement from FIFA confirming Argentina as the new hosts.[11] Argentina will thus become the second nation to host the U-20 World Cup twice (having previously hosted it in 2001). Australia is the other nation that had hosted it twice (1981 and 1993).[citation needed]

Qualified teams edit

A total of 24 teams qualified for the final tournament. Teams qualified from six continental competitions.

The Dominican Republic and Israel made their debut in the competition; this was the Dominican Republic's first-ever qualification for a FIFA tournament. Having qualified for the 1970 FIFA World Cup via the Asian qualification, this was the first FIFA tournament for which Israel qualified as a European representative.

Argentina qualified for the tournament as the host country in place of Indonesia, even though they originally had failed to qualify through the 2023 South American U-20 Championship. Indonesia had also failed to qualify for the competition and lost its automatic spot in the WC when the tournament was moved to Argentina.

Confederation Qualifying tournament Team Appearance Last appearance Previous best performance
AFC
(Asia)
2023 AFC U-20 Asian Cup   Iraq 5th 2013 Fourth place (2013)
  Japan 11th 2019 Runners-up (1999)
  South Korea 16th 2019 Runners-up (2019)
  Uzbekistan 5th 2015 Quarter-finals (2013, 2015)
CAF
(Africa)
2023 U-20 Africa Cup of Nations   Gambia 2nd 2007 Round of 16 (2007)
  Nigeria 13th 2019 Runners-up (1989, 2005)
  Senegal 4th 2019 Fourth place (2015)
  Tunisia 3rd 1985 Group stage (1977, 1985)
CONCACAF
(Central, North America
and Caribbean)
2022 CONCACAF U-20 Championship   Dominican Republic 1st Debut Debut
  Guatemala 2nd 2011 Round of 16 (2011)
  Honduras 9th 2019 Group stage (1977, 1995, 1999, 2005, 2009, 2015, 2017, 2019)
  United States 17th 2019 Fourth place (1989)
CONMEBOL
(South America)
Host nation   Argentina 17th 2019 Champions (1979, 1995, 1997, 2001, 2005, 2007)
2023 South American U-20 Championship   Brazil 19th 2015 Champions (1983, 1985, 1993, 2003, 2011)
  Colombia 11th 2019 Third place (2003)
  Ecuador 5th 2019 Third place (2019)
  Uruguay 16th 2019 Runners-up (1997, 2013)
OFC
(Oceania)
2022 OFC U-19 Championship   Fiji 2nd 2015 Group stage (2015)
  New Zealand 7th 2019 Round of 16 (2015, 2017, 2019)
UEFA
(Europe)
2022 UEFA European Under-19 Championship   England 12th 2017 Champions (2017)
  France 8th 2019 Champions (2013)
  Israel 1st Debut Debut
  Italy 8th 2019 Third place (2017)
  Slovakia 2nd 2003 Round of 16 (2003)

Venues edit

La Plata, Mendoza, San Juan and Santiago del Estero were the four cities chosen to host the competition.

La Plata Santiago del Estero Mendoza San Juan
Estadio Único Diego Armando Maradona Estadio Único Madre de Ciudades Estadio Malvinas Argentinas Estadio San Juan del Bicentenario
Capacity: 53,000 Capacity: 30,000 Capacity: 42,000 Capacity: 25,286
       
2023 FIFA U-20 World Cup (Argentina)

Draw edit

The draw took place at 16:00 CEST (11:00 ART host time) on 21 April 2023 at FIFA headquarters in Zürich, Switzerland.[12] The twenty-four teams were drawn into six groups of four teams, with the hosts, Argentina, automatically seeded to Pot 1 and placed into the first position of Group A, while the remaining teams were seeded into their respective pots based on their results in the last five FIFA U-20 World Cups (more recent tournaments weighted more heavily) as follows:[13][14][15]

Furthermore, five bonus points were added to each of the six continental champions from the qualifying tournaments.[15]

Pot Team Confederation 2011 2013 2015 2017 2019 BP Total
points
Pts 20% Pts 40% Pts 60% Pts 80% Pts 100%
1   Argentina (H) CONMEBOL Host nation, automatically asigned to Pot 1
  Uruguay CONMEBOL 2 0.4 14 5.6 5 3 13 10.4 9 28.4
  United States CONCACAF DNQ 1 0.4 10 6 8 6.4 9 +5 26.8
  France UEFA 12 2.4 14 5.6 DNQ 9 7.2 9 24.2
  Senegal CAF DNQ DNQ 8 4.8 4 3.2 11 +5 24
  Italy UEFA DNQ DNQ DNQ 11 8.8 13 21.8
2   England UEFA 3 0.6 2 0.8 DNQ 19 15.2 DNQ +5 21.6
  South Korea AFC 4 0.8 6 2.4 DNQ 6 4.8 13 21
  New Zealand OFC 2 0.4 0 0 4 2.4 4 3.2 7 +5 18
  Brazil CONMEBOL 17 3.4 DNQ 14 8.4 DNQ DNQ +5 16.8
  Ecuador CONMEBOL 4 0.8 DNQ DNQ 2 1.6 13 15.4
  Colombia CONMEBOL 12 2.4 8 3.2 4 2.4 DNQ 7 15
3   Nigeria CAF 12 2.4 6 2.4 6 3.6 DNQ 4 12.4
  Uzbekistan AFC DNQ 7 2.8 6 3.6 DNQ DNQ +5 11.4
  Japan AFC DNQ DNQ DNQ 4 3.2 5 8.2
  Iraq AFC DNQ 12 4.8 DNQ DNQ DNQ 4.8
  Honduras CONCACAF DNQ DNQ 3 1.8 3 2.4 0 4.2
  Fiji OFC DNQ DNQ 3 1.8 DNQ DNQ 1.8
4   Guatemala CONCACAF 3 0.6 DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ 0.6
  Dominican Republic CONCACAF DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ 0
  Gambia CAF DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ 0
  Israel UEFA DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ 0
  Slovakia UEFA DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ 0
  Tunisia CAF DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ 0

The draw started with teams from pot one being drawn first and placed in the first position of their groups (hosts Argentina automatically assigned to A1). Then were drawn the teams from pot 2, followed by pot 3 and pot 4, with each team also drawn to one of the positions within their group, No group could contain more than one team from each confederation.[16] The ceremony was presented by Samantha Johnson and conducted by FIFA Director of Tournaments Jaime Yarza, with the former footballers Juan Pablo Sorín, from Argentina, and David Trezeguet, from France, acting as draw assistants.[17]

The draw resulted in the following groups:[18]

Group A
Pos Team
A1   Argentina
A2   Uzbekistan
A3   Guatemala
A4   New Zealand
Group B
Pos Team
B1   United States
B2   Ecuador
B3   Fiji
B4   Slovakia
Group C
Pos Team
C1   Senegal
C2   Japan
C3   Israel
C4   Colombia
Group D
Pos Team
D1   Italy
D2   Brazil
D3   Nigeria
D4   Dominican Republic
Group E
Pos Team
E1   Uruguay
E2   Iraq
E3   England
E4   Tunisia
Group F
Pos Team
F1   France
F2   South Korea
F3   Gambia
F4   Honduras

Match officials edit

A total of nineteen refereeing trios (a referee and two assistant referees), six support referees, and eighteen video assistant referees were appointed for the tournament.[19] On 19 May, Swiss referee Sandro Schärer withdrew prior to the tournament due to an injury and was replaced by José María Sánchez Martínez.[20]

Confederation Referees Assistant referees Video assistant referees Support referee
AFC   Yusuke Araki   Jun Mihara
  Takumi Takagi
  Ahmad Muhammad Darwish
  Kim Jong-hyeok
  Sivakorn Pu-udom
  Ahmad Al-Ali
  Mohammed Al-Hoaish   Khalaf Zayid Ash-Shammari
  Yasir Abdullah As-Sultan 
  Salman Falahi   Ramzan Sa'id An-Nu'aimi
  Majid Hudairis Ash-Shammari
CAF   Muhammad Maarouf   Zakaria Burinsi
  Abbas Akram Zarhouni
  Hamza Al-Fariq 
  Umar Ahmad Abdulrahim Ash-Shinawi
  Abdulaziz Muhammad Bouh
  Abongile Tom   Ivanildo Meirelles de Oliveira Sanches Lopes
  Abelmiro dos Reis Monte Negro
  Issa Sy   Nouha Bangoura
  Adou Hermann Désiré Ngoh
CONCACAF   Marco Antonio Ortiz Nava   Enrique Isaac Bustos Díaz 
  Jorge Antonio Sánchez Espinoza 
  Adonai Escobedo
  Tatiana Guzmán
  Timothy Ford
  Bryan López
  Juan Gabriel Calderón   William Arrieta
  Henry Pupiro
  Oshane Nation   Ojay Duhaney
  Jassett Kerr-Wilson
CONMEBOL   Ramon Abatti   Rafael da Silva Alves
  Guilherme Dias Camilo
  Germán Delfino
  Rodolpho Toski
  Juan Lara
  Carlos Orbe
  Yender Herrera
  Piero Maza   Claudio Urrutia
  Alejandro Molina
  Jhon Alexander Ospina Londoño   John León
  John Gallego
  Yael Falcón Pérez   Maximiliano Del Yesso
  Facundo Rodríguez
OFC   Campbell-Kirk Kawana-Waugh   Folio Moeaki
  Bernard Mutukera
  Veer Singh
UEFA   François Letexier   Cyril Mugnier
  Mehdi Rahmouni
  Luis Godinho
  Dennis Higler
  Aleandro Di Paolo
  Willy Delajod
  Guillermo Cuadra Fernández
  Fedayi San
  Donatas Rumšas
  Serdar Gözübüyük   Erwin Zeinstra
  Johan Balder
  José María Sánchez Martínez   Raúl Cabanero Martínez
  Iñigo Prieto López de Ceraín
  Glenn Nyberg   Mahbod Beigi
  Andreas Söderkvist
  Halil Umut Meler   Mustafa Emre Eyisoy
  Kerem Ersoy

Squads edit

Players born between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2007 (inclusive) were eligible to compete in the tournament.

Each team had to name a preliminary squad of between 22 and 50 players. From the preliminary squad, the team had to name a final squad of 21 players (three of whom must be goalkeepers) by the FIFA deadline. Players in the final squad could be replaced by a player from the preliminary squad due to serious injury or illness up to 24 hours prior to kickoff of the team's first match.[21]

Group stage edit

The top two teams of each group and the four best third-placed teams advanced to the round of 16.

All times are in local, Argentina time (UTC–3).[22]

Tiebreakers edit

The rankings of teams in each group were determined as follows (regulations Article 17.7):[21]

  1. points obtained in all group matches;
  2. goal difference in all group matches;
  3. number of goals scored in all group matches;

If two or more teams were equal on the basis of the above three criteria, their rankings were determined by:

  1. points obtained in the group matches between the teams concerned;
  2. goal difference in the group matches between the teams concerned;
  3. number of goals scored in the group matches between the teams concerned;
  4. fair play points:
    • first yellow card: minus one point;
    • indirect red card (second yellow card): minus three points;
    • direct red card: minus four points;
    • yellow card and direct red card: minus five points;
  5. drawing of lots by the FIFA Organising Committee.

Group A edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Argentina (H) 3 3 0 0 10 1 +9 9 Knockout stage
2   Uzbekistan 3 1 1 1 5 4 +1 4
3   New Zealand 3 1 1 1 3 7 −4 4
4   Guatemala 3 0 0 3 0 6 −6 0
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
(H) Hosts
Guatemala  0–1  New Zealand
Report Garbett   80'
Attendance: 15,100
Referee: Abongile Tom (South Africa)
Argentina  2–1  Uzbekistan
Report Makhamadjonov   23'

Uzbekistan  2–2  New Zealand
Report
Attendance: 12,243
Referee: Oshane Nation (Jamaica)
Argentina  3–0  Guatemala
Report

Uzbekistan  2–0  Guatemala
Nematjonov   9', 20' Report
Attendance: 15,357
Referee: Mohamed Marouf (Egypt)
New Zealand  0–5  Argentina
Report
Attendance: 27,836
Referee: Salman Falahi (Qatar)

Group B edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   United States 3 3 0 0 6 0 +6 9 Knockout stage
2   Ecuador 3 2 0 1 11 2 +9 6
3   Slovakia 3 1 0 2 5 4 +1 3
4   Fiji 3 0 0 3 0 16 −16 0
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
United States  1–0  Ecuador
Gómez   90+3' Report
Attendance: 14,865
Referee: Salman Falahi (Qatar)
Fiji  0–4  Slovakia
Report
Attendance: 9,359
Referee: Issa Sy (Senegal)

United States  3–0  Fiji
Report
Attendance: 8,017
Referee: Mohamed Marouf (Egypt)
Ecuador  2–1  Slovakia
Report Szolgai   29'
Attendance: 13,919
Referee: Mohammed Al-Hoaish (Saudi Arabia)

Ecuador  9–0  Fiji
Report
Attendance: 9,958
Referee: Yusuke Araki (Japan)
Slovakia  0–2  United States
Report
Attendance: 15,059
Referee: Ramon Abatti (Brazil)

Group C edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Colombia 3 2 1 0 5 3 +2 7 Knockout stage
2   Israel 3 1 1 1 4 4 0 4
3   Japan 3 1 0 2 3 4 −1 3
4   Senegal 3 0 2 1 2 3 −1 2
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Israel  1–2  Colombia
Turgeman   57' (pen.) Report
Attendance: 7,613
Referee: Juan Gabriel Calderón (Costa Rica)
Senegal  0–1  Japan
Report Matsuki   15'

Senegal  1–1  Israel
P. Diop   80' Report B. N'Diaye   58' (o.g.)
Attendance: 2,078
Referee: Yael Falcón Pérez (Argentina)
Japan  1–2  Colombia
Yamane   30' Report

Colombia  1–1  Senegal
Cortés   90+5' Report Camara   30'
Japan  1–2  Israel
Sakamoto   45+1' Report

Group D edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Brazil 3 2 0 1 10 3 +7 6 Knockout stage
2   Italy 3 2 0 1 6 4 +2 6
3   Nigeria 3 2 0 1 4 3 +1 6
4   Dominican Republic 3 0 0 3 1 11 −10 0
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Nigeria  2–1  Dominican Republic
Report Azcona   23' (pen.)
Attendance: 21,647
Referee: Yusuke Araki (Japan)
Italy  3–2  Brazil
Report Marcos Leonardo   72', 87'
Attendance: 35,531
Referee: Marco Ortiz (Mexico)

Italy  0–2  Nigeria
Report
Brazil  6–0  Dominican Republic
Report

Brazil  2–0  Nigeria
Report
Dominican Republic  0–3  Italy
Report
Attendance: 6,709
Referee: Mohammed Al-Hoaish (Saudi Arabia)

Group E edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   England 3 2 1 0 4 2 +2 7 Knockout stage
2   Uruguay 3 2 0 1 7 3 +4 6
3   Tunisia 3 1 0 2 3 2 +1 3
4   Iraq 3 0 1 2 0 7 −7 1
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
England  1–0  Tunisia
Scarlett   25' Report
Attendance: 2,765
Referee: Ramon Abatti (Brazil)
Uruguay  4–0  Iraq
Report

Uruguay  2–3  England
Report
Attendance: 27,231
Referee: Marco Ortíz (Mexico)
Iraq  0–3  Tunisia
Report
Attendance: 8,021
Referee: Jhon Ospina (Colombia)

Iraq  0–0  England
Report
Attendance: 12,122
Referee: Campbell-Kirk Kawana-Waugh (New Zealand)
Tunisia  0–1  Uruguay
Report Fr. González   90+3' (pen.)

Group F edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Gambia 3 2 1 0 4 2 +2 7 Knockout stage
2   South Korea 3 1 2 0 4 3 +1 5
3   France 3 1 0 2 5 5 0 3
4   Honduras 3 0 1 2 4 7 −3 1
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
France  1–2  South Korea
Virginius   70' (pen.) Report
Attendance: 2,671
Referee: Jhon Ospina (Colombia)
Gambia  2–1  Honduras
Bojang   1', 84' Report Aceituno   5'
Attendance: 3,147
Referee: Campbell-Kirk Kawana-Waugh (New Zealand)

France  1–2  Gambia
Odobert   61' Report
Attendance: 5,314
Referee: Juan Gabriel Calderón (Costa Rica)
South Korea  2–2  Honduras
Report
Attendance: 6,851
Referee: Abongile Tom (South Africa)

Honduras  1–3  France
Ramos   15' Report
Attendance: 8,904
Referee: Issa Sy (Senegal)
South Korea  0–0  Gambia
Report
Attendance: 7,463
Referee: Oshane Nation (Jamaica)

Ranking of third-placed teams edit

The four best third-placed teams from the six groups advanced to the knockout stage along with the six group winners and six runners-up.

Pos Grp Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1 D   Nigeria 3 2 0 1 4 3 +1 6 Knockout stage
2 A   New Zealand 3 1 1 1 3 7 −4 4
3 B   Slovakia 3 1 0 2 5 4 +1 3
4 E   Tunisia 3 1 0 2 3 2 +1 3
5 F   France 3 1 0 2 5 5 0 3
6 C   Japan 3 1 0 2 3 4 −1 3
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Goals scored; 4) Fair play points; 5) Drawing of lots.

In the next stage, the four third-placed teams were matched with the winners of groups A, B, C, and D according to the tournament regulations.

Knockout stage edit

In the knockout stage, if a match was level at the end of 90 minutes of normal playing time, extra time was played (two periods of 15 minutes each). If still tied after extra time, the match would be decided by a penalty shoot-out.[21]

In the round of 16, the four third-placed teams were matched with the winners of groups A, B, C, and D. The specific match-ups involving the third-placed teams depended on which four third-placed teams qualified for the round of 16:[21]

Third-placed teams
qualified from groups
1A
vs
1B
vs
1C
vs
1D
vs
A B C D 3C 3D 3A 3B
A B C E 3C 3A 3B 3E
A B C F 3C 3A 3B 3F
A B D E 3D 3A 3B 3E
A B D F 3D 3A 3B 3F
A B E F 3E 3A 3B 3F
A C D E 3C 3D 3A 3E
A C D F 3C 3D 3A 3F
A C E F 3C 3A 3F 3E
A D E F 3D 3A 3F 3E
B C D E 3C 3D 3B 3E
B C D F 3C 3D 3B 3F
B C E F 3E 3C 3B 3F
B D E F 3E 3D 3B 3F
C D E F 3C 3D 3F 3E

Bracket edit

 
Round of 16Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
              
 
30 May – Mendoza
 
 
  United States4
 
4 June – Santiago del Estero
 
  New Zealand0
 
  United States0
 
1 June – Santiago del Estero
 
  Uruguay2
 
  Gambia0
 
8 June – La Plata
 
  Uruguay1
 
  Uruguay1
 
30 May – Mendoza
 
  Israel0
 
  Uzbekistan0
 
3 June – San Juan
 
  Israel1
 
  Israel (a.e.t.)3
 
31 May – La Plata
 
  Brazil2
 
  Brazil4
 
11 June – La Plata
 
  Tunisia1
 
  Uruguay1
 
31 May – San Juan
 
  Italy0
 
  Colombia5
 
3 June – San Juan
 
  Slovakia1
 
  Colombia1
 
31 May – La Plata
 
  Italy3
 
  England1
 
8 June – La Plata
 
  Italy2
 
  Italy2
 
1 June – Santiago del Estero
 
  South Korea1 Third place play-off
 
  Ecuador2
 
4 June – Santiago del Estero11 June – La Plata
 
  South Korea3
 
  South Korea (a.e.t.)1  Israel3
 
31 May – San Juan
 
  Nigeria0   South Korea1
 
  Argentina0
 
 
  Nigeria2
 

Round of 16 edit

United States  4–0  New Zealand
Report
Attendance: 7,848
Referee: Mohamed Marouf (Egypt)

Uzbekistan  0–1  Israel
Report Khalaily   90+7'
Attendance: 10,492
Referee: Yael Falcón Pérez (Argentina)

Brazil  4–1  Tunisia
Report Ghorbel   90+13'

Colombia  5–1  Slovakia
Report Jambor   87'
Attendance: 4,630
Referee: Mohammed Al-Hoaish (Saudi Arabia)

England  1–2  Italy
Devine   24' Report
Attendance: 12,832
Referee: Ramon Abatti (Brazil)

Argentina  0–2  Nigeria
Report

Gambia  0–1  Uruguay
Report Duarte   65'

Ecuador  2–3  South Korea
Report
Attendance: 12,492
Referee: Oshane Nation (Jamaica)

Quarter-finals edit

Israel  3–2 (a.e.t.)  Brazil
Report
Attendance: 1,765
Referee: Juan Gabriel Calderón (Costa Rica)

Colombia  1–3  Italy
Torres   49' Report
Attendance: 3,167
Referee: Salman Falahi (Qatar)

South Korea  1–0 (a.e.t.)  Nigeria
Choi Seok-hyeon   95' Report

United States  0–2  Uruguay
Report

Semi-finals edit

Uruguay  1–0  Israel
Duarte   61' Report

Italy  2–1  South Korea
Report Lee Seung-won   23' (pen.)
Attendance: 20,998
Referee: Yael Falcón Pérez (Argentina)

Third place play-off edit

Israel  3–1  South Korea
Report Lee Seung-won   24' (pen.)
Attendance: 15,327
Referee: Ramon Abatti (Brazil)

Final edit

Uruguay  1–0  Italy
L. Rodríguez   86' Report

Awards edit

Golden Ball Silver Ball Bronze Ball
  Cesare Casadei   Alan Matturro   Lee Seung-won
Golden Boot Silver Boot Bronze Boot
  Cesare Casadei
(7 goals, 2 assists)
  Marcos Leonardo
(5 goals, 1 assist)
  Óscar Cortés
(4 goals, 2 assists)
Golden Glove
  Sebastiano Desplanches
FIFA Fair Play Trophy
  United States

Goalscorers edit

There were 154 goals scored in 52 matches, for an average of 2.96 goals per match.

7 goals

5 goals

4 goals

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

1 own goal

Final ranking edit

As per statistical convention in football, matches decided in extra time are counted as wins and losses, while matches decided by penalty shoot-outs are counted as draws.

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Final result
1   Uruguay (C) 7 6 0 1 12 3 +9 18 Champions
2   Italy 7 5 0 2 13 8 +5 15 Runners-up
3   Israel 7 4 1 2 11 8 +3 13 Third place
4   South Korea 7 3 2 2 10 10 0 11 Fourth place
5   United States 5 4 0 1 10 2 +8 12 Eliminated in
Quarter-finals
6   Colombia 5 3 1 1 11 7 +4 10
7   Brazil 5 3 0 2 16 7 +9 9
8   Nigeria 5 3 0 2 6 4 +2 9
9   Argentina (H) 4 3 0 1 10 3 +7 9 Eliminated in
Round of 16
10   England 4 2 1 1 5 4 +1 7
11   Gambia 4 2 1 1 4 3 +1 7
12   Ecuador 4 2 0 2 13 5 +8 6
13   Uzbekistan 4 1 1 2 5 5 0 4
14   New Zealand 4 1 1 2 3 11 −8 4
15   Tunisia 4 1 0 3 4 6 −2 3
16   Slovakia 4 1 0 3 6 9 −3 3
17   France 3 1 0 2 5 5 0 3 Eliminated in
Group stage
18   Japan 3 1 0 2 3 4 −1 3
19   Senegal 3 0 2 1 2 3 −1 2
20   Honduras 3 0 1 2 4 7 −3 1
21   Iraq 3 0 1 2 0 7 −7 1
22   Guatemala 3 0 0 3 0 6 −6 0
23   Dominican Republic 3 0 0 3 1 11 −10 0
24   Fiji 3 0 0 3 0 16 −16 0
Source: Techn. Report p. 6
(C) Champions; (H) Hosts

Marketing edit

Development and preparation edit

In early May 2023, FIFA announced that the official song of the tournament would be "Glorious", performed by the Indonesian EDM group Weird Genius and featuring three other Indonesian stars: Lyodra Ginting, Tiara Andini and Ziva Magnolya.[23]

Broadcasting rights edit

Live stream is available on FIFA+, while in Indonesia, available on Moji and Vidio, including replays.[24]

Sponsorship edit

Controversies edit

Protests against Israel's participation in Indonesia and Indonesia's removal as host edit

By finishing second in the 2022 UEFA European Under-19 Championship, Israel qualified to the U-20 World Cup for the first time in history. However, Israel's participation is subject to political controversy due to Indonesia having the world's largest Muslim population and the two countries having no formal relations owing to the Israeli–Palestinian conflict.[27] Given this, Indonesian Minister of Youth and Sports Zainudin Amali stated that FIFA required any country qualified for the U-20 World Cup shall play, and that the local security officers will provide security for the Israeli team.[28]

Despite attempts to confirm Israel's participation, Israel's involvement led to Indonesia coming under scrutiny by various pro-Palestinian organisations.[29] Various Islamist organisations in Indonesia have threatened Israeli players, stating that the Israeli team is not welcome in Indonesia.[citation needed][30] Meanwhile Nahdlatul Ulama figures such as its leader, Yahya Cholil Staquf and Indonesian Minister of Religious Affairs, Yaqut Cholil Qoumas voiced support for Israel's participation.[31] However, one of the six regional heads[note 1] who had signed the original agreement on willingness to be the host for the world cup,[32] Governor of Bali, I Wayan Koster as well as non-signatory Governor of Central Java (where Solo is located), Ganjar Pranowo, both members of the ruling party PDIP, stated their objection of hosting the Israeli team, citing 'anti-colonial' stances of Sukarno rather than religious ones.[33]

The Palestinian Ambassador to Indonesia Zuhair Al-Shun said that his country has no objections to Indonesia's hosting of the tournament, despite Israel's qualification.[34]

On 28 March 2023, Indonesian President Joko Widodo, in a break with his party, voiced his own support to Israeli participation, and implored his people to not mix politics and sport.[35][36] The Mayor of Solo, Gibran Rakabuming Raka, Joko Widodo's son, expressed disappointment with the governor's decision and willingness to hold match draw in Solo,[37] and Bandung.[38] A last minute effort was made to rescue Indonesia's role as host while still acknowledging the country's concerns, but on 29 March, FIFA officially stripped Indonesia as host for the tournament, stating "current circumstances" as the reasoning without specifying the details.[6]

Notes edit

  1. ^ Governor of Jakarta
    Mayor of Surabaya
    Governor of West Java for Bandung
    Mayor of Solo
    Governor of Bali for Gianyar, Bali
    Governor of South Sumatra for Palembang

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ "Bureau of FIFA Council approves increase of FIFA World Cup squads to 26 players". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 23 June 2022. Archived from the original on 16 November 2022. Retrieved 24 June 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d "Casadei claims a golden double". FIFA. 12 June 2023. Retrieved 11 May 2023.
  3. ^ "Five expressions of interest received for hosting FIFA U-20 World Cup 2021". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 23 May 2019. Archived from the original on 23 May 2019. Retrieved 23 May 2019.
  4. ^ "FIFA Council unanimously appoints China PR as hosts of new Club World Cup in 2021". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 24 October 2019. Archived from the original on 24 October 2019. Retrieved 24 October 2019.
  5. ^ "Indonesia's FIFA U-20 World Cup put back to 2023". Olympic Council of Asia. 28 December 2020. Archived from the original on 31 March 2023. Retrieved 31 March 2023.
  6. ^ a b Dunbar, Graham (29 March 2023). "Indonesia stripped of hosting Under-20 World Cup by FIFA". Associated Press. Archived from the original on 29 March 2023. Retrieved 29 March 2023.
  7. ^ Huaman, Gary (29 March 2023). "FIFA le quitó a Indonesia el Mundial sub-20: Perú, Argentina y Qatar son los grandes candidatos". La República (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 30 March 2023. Retrieved 31 March 2023.
  8. ^ "Argentina bids to host U-20 World Cup in place of Indonesia". Reuters. 30 March 2023. Archived from the original on 31 March 2023. Retrieved 31 March 2023.
  9. ^ Coconuts Jakarta (27 May 2023). "Argentina ready to swoop in as Indonesia losing grip on FIFA U-20 World Cup hosting rights". Coconuts. Retrieved 24 April 2023.
  10. ^ "Argentina to host the U-20 World Cup". FIFA. 17 April 2023. Retrieved 18 April 2023.
  11. ^ "FIFA confirms Argentina as host nation for FIFA U-20 World Cup 2023". FIFA.com. 17 April 2023. Retrieved 18 April 2023.
  12. ^ "Draw lays out path to FIFA U-20 World Cup glory". FIFA. 21 April 2023. Retrieved 21 April 2023.
  13. ^ "Everything you need to know about the FIFA U-20 World Cup 2023". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 18 April 2023.
  14. ^ "The FIFA U-20 World Cup draw: Watch Live". FIFA. 20 April 2023.
  15. ^ a b "Draw procedures: FIFA U-20 World Cup Poland 2019" (PDF). FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association.
  16. ^ "Draw | FIFA U-20 World Cup Argentina 2023 | Full Replay". FIFA.com. FIFA. 21 April 2023. Retrieved 1 June 2023.
  17. ^ "The FIFA U-20 World Cup draw: Live streaming, pots and procedures". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 18 April 2023.
  18. ^ "FIFA U-20 World Cup Argentina 2023 match schedule and host cities announced". FIFA. 21 April 2023.
  19. ^ "Match officials for the FIFA U-20 World Cup Argentina 2023 appointed" (PDF). FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 21 April 2023.
  20. ^ "Schiri Sandro Schärer Verpasst U20 WM wegen verletzung". onefootball.com (in German). onefootball. 19 May 2023.
  21. ^ a b c d "Regulations – FIFA U-20 World Cup Indonesia 2023" (PDF). FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Archived (PDF) from the original on 10 November 2022. Retrieved 10 November 2022.
  22. ^ "Match Schedule: FIFA U-20 World Cup Argentina 2023" (PDF). FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association.
  23. ^ "Launch of Official Song for FIFA U-20 World Cup Argentina 2023". FIFA. 7 May 2023. Retrieved 7 May 2023.
  24. ^ Jo, Beni (16 May 2022). "Kapan Piala Dunia U20 2023 Dimulai & Tayang Live di TV Apa?". Tirto.id (in Indonesian). Retrieved 22 May 2022.
  25. ^ "FIFA and adidas extend partnership until 2030". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  26. ^ "Wanda Group becomes new FIFA Partner". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Archived from the original on 20 March 2016. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  27. ^ "We Will Always Stand by Palestinians: Indonesia". Jakarta Globe. 24 December 2021. Archived from the original on 26 June 2022. Retrieved 26 June 2022 – via Antara News Agency.
  28. ^ Siahaan, Michael; Ihsan, Nabil (27 June 2022). Nasution, Rahmad (ed.). "Israeli national team can visit Indonesia for U-20 World Cup". AntaraNews.com. Antara News Agency. Archived from the original on 27 June 2022. Retrieved 27 June 2022.
  29. ^ "Indonesia slammed for allowing Israel to take part in U-20 World Cup". MiddleEastMonitor.com. 28 June 2022. Archived from the original on 26 September 2022. Retrieved 26 September 2022.
  30. ^ Noveanto, Eric (26 June 2022). "Israel Lolos Ke Piala Dunia U-20 Di Indonesia, Bagaimana Respons PSSI & Pemerintah?" [Israel qualified for the U-20 World Cup in Indonesia, how the PSSI and government respond it?]. Goal.com. Archived from the original on 26 September 2022. Retrieved 26 September 2022.
  31. ^ Pebriyanto, Fajar (15 February 2023). "Indonesian Minister: Israeli Football Team's Visit Not Linked to Religious Issues". tempo.co. Archived from the original on 31 March 2023. Retrieved 31 March 2023.
  32. ^ Ikhsan, Harley (26 March 2023). "6 Kepala Daerah Ikut Tanda Tangan Kesediaan Jadi Tuan Rumah Piala Dunia U-20, Kenapa Belakangan Ada yang Tolak Kehadiran Israel?". liputan6.com (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 31 March 2023. Retrieved 31 March 2023.
  33. ^ Sadheli, Mochamad, ed. (24 March 2023). "Ganjar Pranowo Tolak Israel, 2 Gubernur "Melawan" Halaman all". KOMPAS.com (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 28 March 2023. Retrieved 28 March 2023.
  34. ^ "Palestinian envoy unnerved by Israeli participation in U-20 World Cup hosted by Indonesia". The Jakarta Post. 16 March 2023. Archived from the original on 29 March 2023. Retrieved 29 March 2023.
  35. ^ "Clash over Israel costs RI U-20". The Jakarta Post. 30 March 2023. Archived from the original on 31 March 2023. Retrieved 31 March 2023.
  36. ^ Karimi, Niniek. "Indonesia's stance on Israel overshadows world soccer event". APNews.com. Associated Press. Archived from the original on 29 March 2023. Retrieved 30 March 2023.
  37. ^ "Gibran Sebut Solo Siap Gantikan Bali untuk Drawing Piala Dunia U-20". olahraga (in Indonesian). CNN Indonesia. 28 March 2023. Archived from the original on 31 March 2023. Retrieved 31 March 2023.
  38. ^ Prada, Arif (28 March 2023). "Bandung siap jadi tuan rumah pengundian Piala Dunia U20 gantikan Bali". Antara News (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 31 March 2023. Retrieved 31 March 2023.

External links edit