Chile national football team

The Chile national football team (Spanish: Selección de fútbol de Chile) represents Chile in men's international football competitions and is controlled by the Federación de Fútbol de Chile which was established in 1895. The team is commonly referred to as La Roja ("The Red One").[5][6][7] They have appeared in nine World Cup tournaments and were hosts of the 1962 FIFA World Cup where they finished in third place, the highest position the country has ever achieved in the World Cup.

Chile
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)La Roja (The Red One)
El equipo de todos (The team of everyone)
AssociationFederación de Fútbol de Chile (FFCh)
ConfederationCONMEBOL (South America)
Head coachReinaldo Rueda
CaptainGary Medel
Most capsAlexis Sánchez (132)
Top scorerAlexis Sánchez (43)
Home stadiumEstadio Nacional Julio Martínez Prádanos
FIFA codeCHI
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 17 Steady (11 June 2020)[1]
Highest3 (April–May 2016)
Lowest84 (December 2002)
First international
 Argentina 3–1 Chile 
(Buenos Aires, Argentina; 27 May 1910)
Biggest win
 Chile 7–0 Venezuela 
(Santiago, Chile; 29 August 1979)
 Chile 7–0 Armenia 
(Viña del Mar, Chile; 4 January 1997)
 Mexico 0–7 Chile 
(Santa Clara, California, United States; 18 June 2016)
Biggest defeat
 Brazil 7–0 Chile 
(Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 17 September 1959)
World Cup
Appearances9 (first in 1930)
Best resultThird place (1962)
Copa América
Appearances39 (first in 1916)
Best resultChampions (2015, 2016)
Panamerican Championship
Appearances2 (first in 1952)
Best resultRunners-up (1952)
Confederations Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2017)
Best resultRunners-up (2017)

Chile were the reigning Copa América champions; after winning 2015 Copa América on home soil, they successfully defended their title in the United States in the Copa América Centenario in 2016. Prior to this, Chile had been runners-up in the competition on four occasions. As a result of winning the 2015 Copa América, they qualified for the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup, where they finished second.

HistoryEdit

 
The Chilean national team playing at the 1930 FIFA World Cup against Mexico.

The Federación de Fútbol de Chile is the second oldest South American federation, having been founded in Valparaíso on 19 June 1895.[8] Chile was one of the four founding member nations of CONMEBOL. Together with Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay, the four competed in the first South American Championship, later to be renamed the Copa América, in 1916. On 12 October 1926, Chile made the first corner-kick goal in Copa América history in a match against Bolivia. Chile was one of the thirteen national teams that competed in the inaugural World Cup in 1930. The team started off well, beating Mexico and France without conceding a goal. A 3–1 loss to Argentina in the final game left the Chilean team in second place within the group, eliminating it from the tournament. In the 1950 World Cup, Chile defeated the United States, 5–2, but nevertheless was eliminated in the first round.

 
The Chilean national team in 1982.

The best Chilean result in the World Cup was third place in 1962, as the host nation. Chile lost 4–2 to eventual champion Brazil in a semi-final but went on to defeat Yugoslavia 1–0 to earn third place. Chilean players made two World Cup firsts: the first player to miss a World Cup penalty kick was the Chilean Guillermo Subiabre, in a 1930 FIFA World Cup match against France,[9] and Carlos Caszely of Chile became the first player to be sent off with a red card, during a match against West Germany at the 1974 World Cup.

A scandal known as "El Maracanazo" occurred on 3 September 1989. At a 1990 FIFA World Cup qualifying match at Rio de Janeiro's Maracanã stadium, Brazil led Chile 1–0 and La Roja needed to win. Chilean goalkeeper Roberto Rojas fell to the pitch with an apparent injury to his forehead. A firework had been thrown from the stands by a Brazilian fan named Rosenery Mello do Nascimento and was smouldering about a yard away.[10] After Rojas was carried off the pitch, the Chilean players and coaches claimed that conditions were not safe and they refused to return, so the match was abandoned. However, video footage of the match showed that the firework had not made contact with Rojas. FIFA forfeited the game to Brazil, Chile was banned from the qualifiers for the 1994 FIFA World Cup, and Rojas was banned for life,[11] although an amnesty was granted in 2001.[citation needed]

On 19 July 2007, the Chilean Football Federation banned six of the national team players, because of "internal indiscipline" during the Copa América tournament, for 20 international matches each as they destroyed the team hotel property having being drunk. The players banned were captain Jorge Valdivia, defenders Álvaro Ormeño, Rodrigo Tello, Jorge Vargas, Pablo Contreras and striker Reinaldo Navia.[12] Nelson Acosta's resignation as manager came after Chile were knocked out of the 2007 Copa América. After serving 10 matches from the ban, all players aside from Ormeno sent a letter of apology acknowledging their actions which lifted the ban. Chile had qualified to the quarter-finals after a 3–2 win against Ecuador, and a 0–0 draw against Mexico. But two losses, one of those being a 6–1 defeat against Brazil, sealed Acosta's fate. Former Argentina manager Marcelo Bielsa was given the task of becoming the Chile national team manager in preparation for the 2010 World Cup qualifiers.[13]

On 16 October 2008, Chile beat Argentina 1–0 for the first time in a qualifying competition, making history. Marcelo Bielsa was acclaimed for this accomplishment by both Chilean and Argentinian people. This match was seen as one of the reasons that ended Alfio Basile's tenure as Argentina's coach.

After finishing in second place of the CONMEBOL qualifiers for the 2010 FIFA World Cup held in South Africa and reaching the round of 16 at the tournament, head coach Marcelo Bielsa extended his contract with the Chilean national team until 2015. Bielsa stated that he would leave his position if Jorge Segovia were elected as President of the Chilean Football Board. He followed through on this threat, despite Segovia's election being annulled, and resigned in February 2011. Claudio Borghi then became Chile's manager in March 2011.

After a string of bad performances and harsh criticisms, Claudio Borghi stepped down as Chile's manager in November 2012. A new manager, Jorge Sampaoli, was appointed in December 2012. A disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Jorge Sampaoli broke new records for La Roja by winning 10, drawing 3, and losing only 3 of 15 games as the head of the Chilean national team.

 
Chile playing against tournament hosts Brazil, at the 2014 FIFA World Cup Round of 16.

With Sampaoli, Chile were able to qualify for 2014 FIFA World Cup, reaching to the round of 16, where Chile lost to Brazil in penalties.

In the 2015 Copa América, Chile won their first game against Ecuador, with 2–0 being the score. In their second game, Chile drew against Mexico. Chile advanced to the knockout stage as Group A winners with 7 points and most goals scored of any team in the tournament (10). Then they beat Uruguay in the quarterfinals and Peru in the semifinals. In the final, Chile defeated Argentina on penalties (4–1) after a 0–0 draw, to win their first Copa America title.

In January 2016, just six months after winning the 2015 Copa America, Jorge Sampaoli stepped down as Chile's manager.[14] A new manager, the Argentinean Juan Antonio Pizzi, was appointed at the end of the same month, who then led La Roja to a second Copa America Centenario 2016 victory after again beating Argentina in the final.[15]

In the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup held in Russia, for which they had qualified by winning the Copa America, Chile won their first group stage match against Cameroon with 2–0 being the score. In their second match against the Germany, Chile drew after a hard match and both team scored 1. In their final game of the group stage against Australia, Chile drew once again but qualified to the knockout stage on virtue of having more points than Australia, though having less points than Germany. In the semis, after a tense and exciting match, Chile came out on top, beating Portugal on Penalties, 3–0 and hence they qualified for the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup Final. In their first ever final in a FIFA-sanctioned tournament, Chile faced Germany and lost 1–0.

On 10 October 2017, after losing 3–0 to Brazil, Chile failed to qualify for the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia, causing an end to what was perceived as their "golden generation". They ended up being the highest ranked team that failed to qualify at 9th.

Team ImageEdit

The team kit consists of a red jersey, blue shorts, and white socks. The away jersey features a white jersey, white shorts, and blue socks. The color scheme of red, white, and blue that was featured in the 1947 South American Championship, the precursor of the Copa América, has remained in place since. In 2016, red shorts were introduced as an option for the first time.

In August 2010, Puma acquired the contract to be the official kit supplier for the Chilean team from 2011–2015, paying US$ 3 million per year, also providing referees' kits and balls for domestic club competitions. The previous kit supplier, from 2004 to 2010 including the 2010 World Cup, was Brooks Sports.[16]

Puma company ended its link after the 2015 Copa América with the tender for the new brand that will outfit the team since August 2015. This procedure was won by the American company Nike. The contract with Nike lasts until the 2022 FIFA World Cup.[17]

Home stadiumEdit

 
Estadio Nacional at night.

The Chilean national team plays their qualifying matches at the Estadio Nacional Julio Martínez Prádanos located in Santiago, Chile and can be found at the commune of Ñuñoa. The construction of the stadium began in February 1937, and opened on 3 December 1938. The current official registered capacity is of 49,000 spectators, but has surpassed the 75,000 mark on many occasions when the match is of high demand.[18] An example would be the 1962 FIFA World Cup semi-final match Chile vs. Brazil, where over 76,000 spectators viewed the game. The maximum attendance ever was 85,262 on 26 December 1962, for a game between Universidad Católica and Universidad de Chile.

It has hosted four Copa América finals, the final of the 1962 FIFA World Cup and the final to the 1987 FIFA World Youth Championship.

RivalriesEdit

Does not maintain any special rivalry, however the matches considered important are the one played with two of its neighbouring countries.

ArgentinaEdit

With 90 games played, is the most played fixture in the history of the Chilean national team and the third most played for Argentina after their encounters with Uruguay and Brazil. The teams' first meeting was in Buenos Aires on 27 May 1910, and matches always draw large crowds in Chile. Only 1 of the 6 victories on the 90 games played, was in an official competition, which occurred in 2010 World Cup qualification.

PeruEdit

The Chile–Peru football rivalry is known in Spanish as the Clásico del Pacífico ("Pacific Derby").[19] The rivalry is considered to be one of the fiercest rivalries in the world,[20] with CNN World Sport editor Greg Duke ranking it among the top ten football rivalries in the world.[21] The rivalry between Chile and Peru stems from historical politics, border disputes, and the War of the Pacific,[22][23][24] with the rivalry producing some of the most intense matches in South American footballing history.[20]

Chile first faced Peru in the 1935 South American Championship, losing 1–0.[25]

SponsorsEdit

ManagersEdit

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

The following 24 players were called up for the training Microcycle for the 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification from 24 to 26 February 2020.[26][27]
Caps and goals updated as of 15 October 2019 after the match against Guinea.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Brayan Cortés (1995-03-11) 11 March 1995 (age 25) 3 0   Colo-Colo
1GK Fernando de Paul (1991-04-25) 25 April 1991 (age 29) 1 0   Universidad de Chile
1GK Omar Carabalí (1997-06-12) 12 June 1997 (age 23) 0 0   San Luis

2DF Óscar Opazo (1990-10-18) 18 October 1990 (age 29) 13 1   Colo-Colo
2DF Alfonso Parot (1989-10-15) 15 October 1989 (age 30) 5 1   Universidad Católica
2DF Branco Ampuero (1993-07-19) 19 July 1993 (age 27) 1 0   Antofagasta
2DF Benjamín Kuscevic (1996-05-02) 2 May 1996 (age 24) 1 0   Universidad Católica
2DF Felipe Campos (1993-11-08) 8 November 1993 (age 26) 0 0   Colo-Colo
2DF Valber Huerta (1993-08-26) 26 August 1993 (age 26) 0 0   Universidad Católica
2DF Álex Ibacache (1999-01-11) 11 January 1999 (age 21) 0 0   Curicó Unido
2DF Raimundo Rebolledo (1997-05-14) 14 May 1997 (age 23) 0 0   Universidad Católica

3MF César Pinares (1991-05-23) 23 May 1991 (age 29) 9 1   Universidad Católica
3MF Leonardo Valencia (1991-04-25) 25 April 1991 (age 29) 9 1   Colo-Colo
3MF Tomás Alarcón (1999-01-19) 19 January 1999 (age 21) 1 0   O'Higgins
3MF Pablo Aránguiz (1997-03-17) 17 March 1997 (age 23) 0 0   Universidad de Chile
3MF Rodrigo Echeverría (1995-05-17) 17 May 1995 (age 25) 0 0   Everton
3MF César Fuentes (1993-04-12) 12 April 1993 (age 27) 0 0   Colo-Colo
3MF Juan Leiva (1993-11-11) 11 November 1993 (age 26) 0 0   Unión La Calera

4FW Edson Puch (1986-04-09) 9 April 1986 (age 34) 20 2   Universidad Católica
4FW Ángelo Henríquez (1994-04-13) 13 April 1994 (age 26) 12 2   Universidad de Chile
4FW Roberto Gutiérrez (1983-04-18) 18 April 1983 (age 37) 6 3   O'Higgins
4FW Marcos Bolados (1996-02-28) 28 February 1996 (age 24) 3 1   Colo-Colo
4FW Patricio Rubio (1989-04-18) 18 April 1989 (age 31) 3 1   Alianza Lima
4FW Andrés Vilches (1992-01-14) 14 January 1992 (age 28) 1 0   Unión La Calera

Recent call-upsEdit

The following players have been called up in the last twelve months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Claudio Bravo (1983-04-13) 13 April 1983 (age 37) 123 0   Manchester City v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
GK Gabriel Arias (1987-09-13) 13 September 1987 (age 32) 12 0   Racing v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
GK Gonzalo Collao (1997-09-09) 9 September 1997 (age 22) 1 0   Extremadura v.   Guinea, 15 October 2019

DF Gary Medel (captain) (1987-08-03) 3 August 1987 (age 33) 126 7   Bologna v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
DF Mauricio Isla (1988-06-12) 12 June 1988 (age 32) 115 4 Unattached v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
DF Guillermo Maripán (1994-05-06) 6 May 1994 (age 26) 24 2   Monaco v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
DF Miiko Albornoz (1990-11-30) 30 November 1990 (age 29) 14 2 Unattached v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
DF Sebastián Vegas (1996-12-04) 4 December 1996 (age 23) 9 1   Monterrey v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
DF Francisco Sierralta (1997-05-06) 6 May 1997 (age 23) 2 0   Empoli v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
DF Paulo Díaz (1994-08-25) 25 August 1994 (age 25) 23 0   River Plate v.   Guinea, 15 October 2019 WD
DF Igor Lichnovsky (1994-03-07) 7 March 1994 (age 26) 7 0   Cruz Azul v.   Honduras, 10 September 2019
DF José Bizama (1994-06-25) 25 June 1994 (age 26) 4 0   Houston Dynamo v.   Honduras, 10 September 2019
DF Guillermo Soto (1994-01-10) 10 January 1994 (age 26) 0 0   Palestino v.   Honduras, 10 September 2019

MF Arturo Vidal (1987-05-22) 22 May 1987 (age 33) 115 28   Barcelona v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
MF Charles Aránguiz (1989-04-17) 17 April 1989 (age 31) 78 7   Bayer Leverkusen v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
MF Erick Pulgar (1994-01-15) 15 January 1994 (age 26) 24 1   Fiorentina v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
MF Diego Valdés (1994-01-30) 30 January 1994 (age 26) 13 1   Santos Laguna v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
MF Lorenzo Reyes (1991-06-13) 13 June 1991 (age 29) 10 1   Atlas v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
MF Esteban Pavez (1990-05-01) 1 May 1990 (age 30) 8 0   Al-Nasr v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
MF Claudio Baeza (1993-12-23) 23 December 1993 (age 26) 4 0   Necaxa v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
MF Felipe Gallegos (1991-12-03) 3 December 1991 (age 28) 0 0   Atlético San Luis v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
MF Felipe Gutiérrez (1990-10-08) 8 October 1990 (age 29) 35 4   Sporting Kansas City v.   Honduras, 10 September 2019 WD

FW Felipe Mora (1993-08-02) 2 August 1993 (age 27) 5 1   Portland Timbers v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
FW Jean Meneses (1993-03-16) 16 March 1993 (age 27) 2 1   León v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
FW Christian Bravo (1993-10-01) 1 October 1993 (age 26) 2 0   Peñarol v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 CAN
FW Nicolás Castillo (1993-02-14) 14 February 1993 (age 27) 24 4   América v.   Peru, 19 November 2019 INJ
FW Diego Rubio (1993-05-15) 15 May 1993 (age 27) 9 0   Colorado Rapids v.   Guinea, 15 October 2019
FW Niklas Castro [28] (1996-01-08) 8 January 1996 (age 24) 0 0   Aalesund v.   Guinea, 15 October 2019
FW Alexis Sánchez (1988-12-19) 19 December 1988 (age 31) 132 43   Internazionale v.   Guinea, 15 October 2019 INJ
FW Fabián Orellana (1986-01-27) 27 January 1986 (age 34) 41 2   Valladolid v.   Guinea, 15 October 2019 WD
FW Eduardo Vargas (1989-11-20) 20 November 1989 (age 30) 91 38   UANL v.   Honduras, 10 September 2019
FW Ángelo Sagal (1993-04-18) 18 April 1993 (age 27) 18 2 Unattached v.   Honduras, 10 September 2019
FW Ignacio Jeraldino (1995-12-06) 6 December 1995 (age 24) 4 0   Atlas v.   Honduras, 10 September 2019

  • CAN Match cancelled
  • INJ Withdrew from the squad due to injury
  • PRE Preliminary squad
  • RET Retired from National Team
  • SUS Withdrew from the squad due to suspension
  • WD Withdrew from the squad for non-injury related reasons.

Results and fixturesEdit

2019Edit

10 September FriendlyHonduras  2–1  ChileSan Pedro Sula, Honduras
19:30 UTC−6
Report
Stadium: Estadio Olímpico Metropolitano
Referee: Juan Calderón (Costa Rica)
12 October FriendlyColombia  0–0  ChileAlicante, Spain
18:00 UTC+2 Report Stadium: Estadio José Rico Pérez
Referee: Jason Barcelo (Gibraltar)
15 October FriendlyChile  3–2  GuineaAlicante, Spain
18:00 UTC+2
Report
Stadium: Estadio José Rico Pérez
Referee: Fyodor Zammit (Malta)
19 November FriendlyPeru  canceled[29]  ChileLima, Peru
Stadium: Estadio Nacional de Lima

2020Edit

2021Edit

RecordsEdit

Competitive recordEdit

FIFA World CupEdit

     Champions       Runners-up       Third Place       Fourth Place  

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
  1930 Group stage 5th 3 2 0 1 5 3 Qualified as invitees
  1934 Withdrew Withdrew
  1938
  1950 Group stage 9th 3 1 0 2 5 6 Qualified automatically
  1954 Did not qualify 4 0 0 4 1 10
  1958 4 1 0 3 2 10
  1962 Third place 3rd 6 4 0 2 10 8 Qualified as hosts
  1966 Group stage 13th 3 0 1 2 2 5 5 3 1 1 14 8
  1970 Did not qualify 4 1 2 1 5 4
  1974 Group stage 11th 3 0 2 1 1 2 5 3 1 1 6 2
  1978 Did not qualify 4 2 1 1 5 3
  1982 Group stage 22nd 3 0 0 3 3 8 4 3 1 0 6 0
  1986 Did not qualify 9 5 2 2 18 12
  1990 4 2 1 1 9 4
  1994 Banned Banned
  1998 Round of 16 16th 4 0 3 1 5 8 16 7 4 5 32 18
    2002 Did not qualify 18 3 3 12 15 27
  2006 18 5 7 6 18 22
  2010 Round of 16 10th 4 2 0 2 3 5 18 10 3 5 32 22
  2014 9th 4 2 1 1 6 4 16 9 1 6 29 25
  2018 Did not qualify 18 8 2 8 26 27
  2022 To be determined To be determined
      2026
Total Third place 9/21 33 11 7 15 40 49 147 62 29 56 218 194

Copa AméricaEdit

     Champions       Runners-up       Third Place       Fourth Place  

South American Championship / Copa América record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1916 Fourth place 4th 3 0 1 2 2 11
  1917 Fourth place 4th 3 0 0 3 0 10
  1919 Fourth place 4th 3 0 0 3 1 12
  1920 Fourth place 4th 3 0 1 2 2 4
  1921 Withdrew
  1922 Fifth place 5th 4 0 1 3 1 10
  1923 Withdrew
  1924 Fourth place 4th 3 0 0 3 1 10
  1925 Withdrew
  1926 Third place 3rd 4 2 1 1 14 6
  1927 Withdrew
  1929 Did not participate
  1935 Fourth place 4th 3 0 0 3 2 7
  1937 Fifth place 5th 5 1 1 3 12 13
  1939 Fourth place 4th 4 1 0 3 8 12
  1941 Third place 3rd 4 2 0 2 6 3
  1942 Sixth place 6th 6 1 1 4 4 15
  1945 Third place 3rd 6 4 1 1 15 5
  1946 Fifth place 5th 5 2 0 3 8 11
  1947 Fourth place 4th 7 4 1 2 14 13
  1949 Fifth place 5th 7 2 1 4 10 14
  1953 Fourth place 4th 6 3 1 2 10 10
  1955 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 1 1 19 8
  1956 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 0 2 11 8
  1957 Sixth place 6th 6 1 1 4 9 17
  1959 Fifth place 5th 6 2 1 3 9 14
  1959 Did not participate
  1963
  1967 Third place 3rd 5 2 2 1 8 6
  1975 Group stage 6th 4 1 1 2 7 6
  1979 Runners-up 2nd 9 4 3 2 13 6
  1983 Group stage 5th 4 2 1 1 8 2
  1987 Runners-up 2nd 4 3 0 1 9 3
  1989 Group stage 5th 4 2 0 2 7 5
  1991 Third place 3rd 7 3 2 2 11 6
  1993 Group stage 9th 3 1 0 2 3 4
  1995 Group stage 11th 3 0 1 2 3 8
  1997 Group stage 11th 3 0 0 3 1 5
  1999 Fourth place 4th 6 2 1 3 8 7
  2001 Quarter-finals 7th 4 2 0 2 5 5
  2004 Group stage 10th 3 0 1 2 2 4
  2007 Quarter-finals 8th 4 1 1 2 4 11
  2011 Quarter-finals 5th 4 2 1 1 5 4
  2015 Champions 1st 6 4 2 0 13 4
  2016 Champions 1st 6 4 1 1 16 5
  2019 Fourth place 4th 6 2 1 3 7 7
    2021 Qualified
  2024 Qualified
Total 2 Titles 39/46 183 66 31 86 288 311

FIFA Confederations CupEdit

FIFA Confederations Cup record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1992 Did not qualify
  1995
  1997
  1999
    2001
  2003
  2005
  2009
  2013
  2017 Runners-up 2nd 5 1 3 1 4 3
Total Runners-up 1/10 5 1 3 1 4 3

Olympic GamesEdit

Olympic Games record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1896 No football tournament
  1900 Did not participate
  1904
  1908
  1912
  1920
  1924
  1928 Consolation final 10th 3 1 1 1 7 7
 1932 No football tournament
 1936 Withdrew
  1948 Did not participate
  1952 Preliminary round 17th 1 0 0 1 4 5
  1956 Did not participate
  1960 Did not qualify
  1964
  1968
  1972
  1976
  1980
  1984 Quarter-finals 7th 4 1 2 1 2 2
  1988 Did not qualify
1992–present See Chile Olympic football team
Total Quarter-finals 3/18 8 6 3 5 27 20

Pan American GamesEdit

Pan American Games record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1951 Bronze medal 3rd 4 1 2 1 8 6
  1955 Did not participate
  1959
  1963 Bronze medal 3rd 4 2 1 1 12 6
  1967 Did not participate
  1971
  1975
  1979
  1983 Round 1 4th 3 1 2 0 3 2
  1987 Silver medal 2nd 5 2 2 1 6 6
  1991 Did not participate
  1995 Quarter-finals 7th 4 1 1 2 3 6
  1999 Did not participate
  2003
  2007
  2011
  2015
  2019
  2023 Qualified as host
Total Silver medal 6/19 20 7 8 5 32 26

HonoursEdit

Minor titlesEdit

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  • In 2010, Chicago-based rock band Manwomanchild released the song "Chile La Roja" in support of Chile's 2010 World Cup team.[30][31][32]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking". FIFA. 11 June 2020. Retrieved 11 June 2020.
  2. ^ After 1988, the tournament has been restricted to squads with no more than 3 players over the age of 23, and these matches are not regarded as part of the national team's record, nor are caps awarded.
  3. ^ Elo rankings change compared to one year ago. "World Football Elo Ratings". eloratings.net. 1 August 2020. Retrieved 1 August 2020.
  4. ^ "World Football Elo Ratings: Chile". eloratings.net. World Football Elo Ratings. Retrieved 25 April 2018.
  5. ^ "Uno a uno de la Roja: Buenas individualidades pero falta juego colectivo". EMOL (El Mercurio On-Line). 29 February 2012. Retrieved 6 March 2012.
  6. ^ Mateo, Miguel Ángel (31 May 2010). "El porqué de 'la Roja'". El Mundo (España). Retrieved 15 September 2011.
  7. ^ "Sudáfrica será el octavo Mundial para la 'Roja'". El Mercurio de Antofagasta. 6 March 2012. Retrieved 11 October 2009.
  8. ^ "Confederación Sudamericana de Fútbol".
  9. ^ "Archived copy" (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 10 September 2007. Retrieved 5 September 2007.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^ "Rosenery Mello do Nascimento, a "Fogueteira do Maracanã", tem morte cerebral por aneurisma no Rio aos 45 anos". Cabeça de Cuia (in Portuguese). 6 June 2011. Archived from the original on 11 September 2011. Retrieved 6 June 2011.
  11. ^ Goal.com – Editorial/Comment – Own Goal: Faking Being Hit By Objects Archived 15 October 2007 at the Wayback Machine
  12. ^ "Chile blacklist six Copa players". BBC Sport. 11 July 2007. Retrieved 12 July 2007.
  13. ^ "Chile name Bielsa as new coach". Retrieved 9 July 2015.
  14. ^ "Jorge Sampaoli quits as Chile manager after row with new president". The Guardian. 19 January 2016. Retrieved 22 November 2016.
  15. ^ "Juan Antonio Pizzi named new Chile coach to 2018 World Cup". Associated Press. 30 January 2016.
  16. ^ (in Spanish) http://www.emol.com/noticias/deportes/detalle/detallenoticias.asp?idnoticia=251738
  17. ^ C. Barrera y M. Parker, ed. (24 April 2015). "Nike vestirá a la Roja hasta el Mundial de Rusia de 2022". La Tercera. www.latercera.com. Archived from the original on 23 June 2015. Retrieved 25 April 2015. El acuerdo se cerró en los últimos días. El contrato será vigente después de la Copa América hasta la cita planetaria.
  18. ^ "Estadio Nacional de Chile". The Stadium Guide. Retrieved 9 July 2015.
  19. ^ "A derby and a debut in South America". FIFA. 10 October 2011. Retrieved 4 July 2015.
  20. ^ a b Arango, Juan. "Peru, Chile and the War of the Pacific". The New York Times. Retrieved 25 December 2016.
  21. ^ Greg Duke (6 November 2008). "Top 10 international rivalries". CNN. Retrieved 27 June 2013.
  22. ^ "Politics, war and the bicycle kick: Chile and Peru set to renew storied rivalry at Copa America". The National. Retrieved 25 December 2016.
  23. ^ Long, Gideon. "Fierce rivalry underpins Chile versus Peru clash". Reuters. Retrieved 25 December 2016.
  24. ^ "Inside South American Soccer Rivalries". wbur.org. Retrieved 25 December 2016.
  25. ^ "Chile – Peru matches, 1935–2011". RSSSF. 6 March 2012. Retrieved 17 June 2013.
  26. ^ "Reinaldo Rueda inicia microciclos con la Selección Chilena". Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  27. ^ "Omar Carabalí se suma al microciclo de La Roja adulta". Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  28. ^ "La razón por la que Niklas Castro aún no puede jugar por la Roja". Retrieved 7 November 2019.
  29. ^ "Comunicado Selección Chilena". Retrieved 14 November 2019.
  30. ^ "La pegajosa canción que alienta a Chile en inglés". Il Mercurio (in Spanish). 21 June 2010. Retrieved 29 June 2010.
  31. ^ "Top: La Roja tiene himno anglo". Las Últimas Noticias (in Spanish). 23 June 2010. Retrieved 29 June 2010.
  32. ^ "La Roja de Bielsa ahora tiene un himno en versión anglo". La Nación (in Spanish). 23 June 2010. Archived from the original on 28 June 2010. Retrieved 29 June 2010.

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