Ecuador national football team

The Ecuador national football team (Spanish: Selección de fútbol de Ecuador) represents Ecuador in men's international football and is controlled by the Ecuadorian Football Federation (FEF). They joined FIFA in 1926 and CONMEBOL a year later.

Ecuador
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)La Tri (The Tri)
La Tricolor (The Tricolors)
AssociationEcuadorian Football Federation (FEF)
ConfederationCONMEBOL (South America)
Head coachFélix Sánchez Bas
CaptainEnner Valencia
Most capsIván Hurtado (168)
Top scorerEnner Valencia (38)
Home stadiumEstadio Rodrigo Paz Delgado
FIFA codeECU
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 41 Steady (6 April 2023)[1]
Highest10 (June 2013)
Lowest71 (November 2017)
First international
 Bolivia 1–1 Ecuador 
(Bogotá, Colombia; 8 August 1938)
Biggest win
 Ecuador 6–0 Peru 
(Quito, Ecuador; 22 June 1975)
Biggest defeat
 Argentina 12–0 Ecuador 
(Montevideo, Uruguay; 22 January 1942)
World Cup
Appearances4 (first in 2002)
Best resultRound of 16 (2006)
Copa América
Appearances29 (first in 1939)
Best resultFourth place (1959, 1993)
CONCACAF Gold Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2002)
Best resultGroup stage (2002)

Discarding an invitation to participate in the inaugural FIFA World Cup held in Uruguay, Ecuador did not make their tournament debut until 2002. After finishing above Brazil and Uruguay in the standings, the qualifying campaign marked the emergence of several players, such as Agustín Delgado, Álex Aguinaga, Iván Hurtado, Ulises de la Cruz and Iván Kaviedes, who would set the stage for Ecuador's achievements in the next decade.[3] Having reached the Round of 16 in a memorable 2006 World Cup campaign,[4] they were expected to deliver at the 2007 Copa América but were eliminated in the group stage.[5] Along with Venezuela, they have not won the continental tournament. La Tri's best performance was fourth in 1959 and 1993, both times on home soil.

Ecuador plays the majority of their home matches at the Estadio Olímpico Atahualpa in Quito.

HistoryEdit

Historically, Ecuador has been seen as a struggling footballing nation in South America. Despite their past failures, however, Ecuador has risen to be a serious South American competitor in recent years.

Football was introduced to Ecuador by Juan Alfredo Wright, who had recently returned from university in England. On 23 April 1899, he and his brother Roberto founded the first Ecuadorian football team, Guayaquil Sport Club.[6][7] As the popularity of the sport grew in the country, more teams were established. On 30 May 1925, the Federación Deportiva Nacional del Ecuador was founded.[7] In 1930, FIFA sent an invitation encouraging for a men's national team to participate at the maiden World Cup. However, the then-Minister of Social Security and Sports declined the offer as they did not approve of the financial allocation.[8]

In 1938, the I Bolivarian Games were organized, with Ecuador set to take part in the football tournament. On 8 August 1938, they played their first-ever match; a 1–1 draw with Bolivia. Their following game saw the national team earn a 2–1 win against Colombia. Following a 9–1 crushing by Peru and a 5–2 victory over Venezuela, Ecuador was tied for the silver medal with Bolivia. A playoff saw the Bolivians emerge triumphantly and the Ecuadorians finished the competition with the bronze medal.[9]

 
The Ecuador squad that participated at the 1942 South American Championship

After finishing fourth at the 1959 South American Championship, the team entered the World Cup qualifiers for the first time. They failed to qualify for 1962 finals after inflicted defeats by Argentina.

The 1998 World Cup qualifiers saw the format for qualifying in CONMEBOL changed to a league home-and-away system. This difference made a huge impact on Ecuador's performance as they clinched several important home wins during the campaign. In the end, they achieved a 6th-place finish, just under Peru and Chile.

Following the appointment of Hernán Darío Gómez for their 2002 World Cup qualifying campaign, Ecuador recorded a historic 1–0 win against Brazil.[10] A 5–1 win over Bolivia saw la Tricolor only needing a point to qualify for the World Cup. They faced Uruguay, and, after managing to cling onto a 1–1 draw, obtained their spot in the World Cup in Japan.[3]

Ecuador started the 2002 World Cup with a 2–0 loss to Italy. Agustín Delgado scored his country's first World Cup goal; he opened the scoring in a 2–1 loss to Mexico.[11] Though they finished fourth in Group G and 24th overall, Ecuador defeated Croatia, who had achieved third place in the previous tournament, and eliminated the Croats in process.

A disappointing showing at the 2004 Copa América led to the resignation of Gómez, who was replaced by Luis Fernando Suárez. He led them successfully through the latter stages of the qualification process for the 2006 FIFA World Cup, finishing third to make the finals. In Germany, they were drawn into Group A with the hosts, Poland, and Costa Rica. Wins over Poland and Costa Rica earned Ecuador qualification to the knockout stages for the first time.

 
Michael Arroyo executing a free kick against Switzerland at the 2014 World Cup

After a dull 2014 FIFA World Cup, and an unpleasant streak of failing to advance past the group stages of the Copa América, Gustavo Quinteros was hired to help rebuild the national team. Quinteros helped Ecuador reach the quarter-finals of the Copa América Centenario[12] and started the 2018 World Cup qualifiers strong. They were setback after a loss to Uruguay and finished eighth in the standings.

Gómez was reinstalled to lead Ecuador at the 2019 Copa América. His second stint was short, as he was soon fired after a disastrous tournament, having only earned a point.[13]

For the qualifying for the 2026 FIFA World Cup, as punishment for falsifying birth documents for Byron Castillo in the previous World Cup qualification cycle, Ecuador were deducted 3 points and fined CHF 100,000.[14]

Home stadiumEdit

 
Aerial view of the stadium in 2017

The Ecuador national team plays their home games at the Estadio Olímpico Atahualpa in Quito. Having opened in 1951, it initially had a capacity of 45,000, but was later reduced to 35,724.

The stadium has a running track, which has gone to be one of the most important in South America for events organized by the former International Association of Athletics Federations.[15]

15 gates surround the stadium, allowing for an evacuation to be completed in about 10 minutes. The venue also features an electronic scoreboard located in the northern sector. The screen, manufactured by Hungarian-based company Elektroimpex in 1985, measures 10 meters tall and 30 meters wide.[16]

In this stadium, Ecuador defeated Uruguay at the 1993 Copa América and Brazil at the 2002 World Cup qualifiers.[10] After tying with the former on 7 November 2001, Ecuador qualified for their first World Cup. Since then, Ecuador has qualified three times.

The stadium is set to be demolished in late-2020 for a newer stadium, which in first instance was for preparation for the 2024 Copa América.[17][18] However, Ecuador declined to host Copa America in 2022.[19]

For the 2022 FIFA World Cup qualifiers, Ecuador played at the Casa Blanca.[citation needed]

Team imageEdit

 
The Ecuador team posing before facing Argentina in October 2017

The standard Ecuador uniform maintains the colours of the national flag, typically a yellow top, blue shorts, and red socks.[20] The alternate colours of the uniform are white and blue, this being based on the flag of the Guayas Province. From 1965 to 2020, the crest featured the Andean condor, Ecuador's national bird, above a shield with the country's colors. In January 2020, the Ecuadorian Football Federation announced a rebrand of the logo; a navy blue shield with an "FEF" monogram attempting to "abstractly build a condor".[21][22]

Kit sponsorshipEdit

Kit supplier Period
  Adidas 1985
  Credeport 1986–1990
  Puma 1991–1992
  Reebok 1993–1994
  Marathon 1994–present

Results and fixturesEdit

The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

  Win   Draw   Loss   Fixture

2022Edit

2 June Friendly Ecuador   1–0   Nigeria Harrison, United States
20:30 UTC−4
  • Estupiñán   3'
Report Stadium: Red Bull Arena
Attendance: 25,219
Referee: Ricardo Montero (Costa Rica)
5 June Friendly Mexico   0–0   Ecuador Chicago, United States
18:30 UTC−5 Report Stadium: Soldier Field
Attendance: 59,000
Referee: Oliver Vergara (Panama)
11 June Friendly Ecuador   1–0   Cape Verde Fort Lauderdale, United States
19:30 UTC−4
Report Stadium: Drive Pink Stadium
Attendance: 4,950
Referee: Moeth Gaymes (Saint Vincent and the Grenadines)
23 September Friendly Saudi Arabia   0–0   Ecuador Murcia, Spain
19:00 UTC+2 Report Stadium: Estadio Nueva Condomina
Attendance: 10,000
Referee: Ivan Bebek (Croatia)
27 September Friendly Japan   0–0   Ecuador Düsseldorf, Germany
19:30 UTC+2 Report Stadium: Merkur Spiel-Arena
Attendance: 4,321
Referee: Sascha Stegemann (Germany)
12 November Friendly Ecuador   0–0   Iraq Madrid, Spain
18:30 UTC+1 Report Stadium: Metropolitano Stadium
Attendance: 35,000
Referee: Gustavo Correia (Portugal)
20 November 2022 FIFA World Cup Qatar   0–2   Ecuador Al Khor, Qatar
19:00 AST (UTC+3) Report Valencia   16' (pen.), 31' Stadium: Al Bayt Stadium
Attendance: 67,372
Referee: Daniele Orsato (Italy)
25 November 2022 FIFA World Cup Netherlands   1–1   Ecuador Al Rayyan, Qatar
19:00 AST (UTC+3) Gakpo   6' Report Valencia   49' Stadium: Khalifa International Stadium
Attendance: 44,833
Referee: Mustapha Ghorbal (Algeria)
29 November 2022 FIFA World Cup Ecuador   1–2   Senegal Al Rayyan, Qatar
18:00 AST (UTC+3)
Report
Stadium: Khalifa International Stadium
Attendance: 44,569
Referee: Clément Turpin (France)

2023Edit

24 March Friendly Australia   3–1   Ecuador Sydney, Australia
20:00 AEDT
Report
Stadium: CommBank Stadium
Attendance: 20,668
Referee: Kim Dae-yong (South Korea)
28 March Friendly Australia   1–2   Ecuador Melbourne, Australia
19:30 AEDT
Report
Stadium: Marvel Stadium
Attendance: 27,103
Referee: Chae Sang-hyeop (South Korea)
17 June Friendly Bolivia   v   Ecuador Harrison, United States
--:-- UTC−4 Report Stadium: Red Bull Arena
20 June Friendly Costa Rica   v   Ecuador Chester, United States
--:-- UTC−4 Report Stadium: Subaru Park
September 2026 FIFA World Cup qualification Argentina   v   Ecuador Argentina
--:-- UTC−3
September 2026 FIFA World Cup qualification Ecuador   v   Uruguay Ecuador
--:-- UTC−5
October 2026 FIFA World Cup qualification Ecuador   v   Colombia Ecuador
--:-- UTC−5
November 2026 FIFA World Cup qualification Venezuela   v   Ecuador Venezuela
--:-- UTC−4
November 2026 FIFA World Cup qualification Ecuador   v   Chile Ecuador
--:-- UTC−5

Coaching staffEdit

As of 11 March 2023
Position Name
Head coach   Félix Sánchez
Assistant coach   Alberto Fernández
Assistant coach   Javi Ramos
Physical coach   Alberto Mendez
Goalkeeping coach   Julius Büscher
Fitness coach   Carlos Domenech

Coaching historyEdit

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

The following players were called up for the friendly matches against Australia on 24 and 28 March 2023.[23]

Caps and goals correct as of 28 March 2023, after the match against Australia.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Hernán Galíndez (1987-03-30) 30 March 1987 (age 36) 16 0   Aucas
12 1GK Moisés Ramírez (2000-09-09) 9 September 2000 (age 22) 3 0   Independiente del Valle
22 1GK Alexander Domínguez (1987-06-05) 5 June 1987 (age 35) 68 0   LDU Quito

2 2DF Félix Torres (1997-01-11) 11 January 1997 (age 26) 22 3   Santos Laguna
3 2DF Piero Hincapié (2002-01-09) 9 January 2002 (age 21) 26 1   Bayer Leverkusen
4 2DF Joel Ordóñez (2004-04-21) 21 April 2004 (age 19) 0 0   Club Brugge
6 2DF Willian Pacho (2001-10-16) 16 October 2001 (age 21) 1 1   Eintracht Frankfurt
7 2DF Pervis Estupiñán (1998-01-21) 21 January 1998 (age 25) 33 4   Brighton & Hove Albion
14 2DF Xavier Arreaga (1994-09-28) 28 September 1994 (age 28) 20 1   Seattle Sounders FC
17 2DF Ángelo Preciado (1998-02-18) 18 February 1998 (age 25) 29 0   Genk
18 2DF Diego Palacios (1999-07-12) 12 July 1999 (age 23) 12 0   Los Angeles FC

5 3MF José Cifuentes (1999-03-12) 12 March 1999 (age 24) 15 0   Rangers
9 3MF Alexander Alvarado (1999-04-21) 21 April 1999 (age 24) 4 0   LDU Quito
10 3MF Junior Sornoza (1994-01-28) 28 January 1994 (age 29) 15 2   Independiente del Valle
15 3MF Ángel Mena (1988-01-21) 21 January 1988 (age 35) 48 7   León
16 3MF Jeremy Sarmiento (2002-06-16) 16 June 2002 (age 20) 13 0   Brighton & Hove Albion
19 3MF Marco Angulo (2002-05-08) 8 May 2002 (age 21) 2 0   FC Cincinnati
20 3MF Jhegson Méndez (1997-04-26) 26 April 1997 (age 26) 36 0   São Paulo
21 3MF Alan Franco (1998-08-21) 21 August 1998 (age 24) 28 1   Talleres
23 3MF Moisés Caicedo (2001-11-02) 2 November 2001 (age 21) 30 3   Brighton & Hove Albion

8 4FW Kevin Rodríguez (2000-03-04) 4 March 2000 (age 23) 5 0   Independiente del Valle
11 4FW Michael Estrada (1996-04-07) 7 April 1996 (age 27) 41 8   Cruz Azul

Recent call-upsEdit

The following players have been called up during the last twelve months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Gilmar Napa (2003-01-05) 5 January 2003 (age 20) 0 0   Emelec v.   Iraq, 12 November 2022
GK Gonzalo Valle (1996-02-28) 28 February 1996 (age 27) 0 0   Guayaquil City v.   Japan, 27 September 2022

DF José Hurtado (2001-12-23) 23 December 2001 (age 21) 1 0   Red Bull Bragantino v.   Australia, 24 March 2023 INJ
DF Robert Arboleda (1991-10-22) 22 October 1991 (age 31) 33 2   São Paulo 2022 FIFA World Cup
DF Jackson Porozo (2000-08-04) 4 August 2000 (age 22) 7 0   Troyes 2022 FIFA World Cup
DF Byron Castillo (1998-11-10) 10 November 1998 (age 24) 13 0   León v.   Iraq, 12 November 2022
DF Jhoanner Chávez (2002-04-25) 25 April 2002 (age 21) 1 0   Bahía v.   Iraq, 12 November 2022
DF Fernando León (1993-04-11) 11 April 1993 (age 30) 6 0   Emelec v.   Japan, 27 September 2022

MF Carlos Gruezo (1995-04-19) 19 April 1995 (age 28) 47 1   San Jose Earthquakes v.   Australia, 24 March 2023 INJ
MF Gonzalo Plata (2000-11-01) 1 November 2000 (age 22) 33 5   Valladolid v.   Australia, 24 March 2023 INJ
MF Sebastián González (2003-06-06) 6 June 2003 (age 19) 0 0   LDU Quito v.   Iraq, 12 November 2022
MF Nilson Angulo (2003-06-19) 19 June 2003 (age 19) 3 0   Anderlecht v.   Japan, 27 September 2022
MF Patrickson Delgado (2003-10-17) 17 October 2003 (age 19) 0 0   Jong Ajax v.   Japan, 27 September 2022
MF Anthony Valencia (2003-07-21) 21 July 2003 (age 19) 0 0   Antwerp v.   Japan, 27 September 2022
MF Dixon Arroyo (1992-06-01) 1 June 1992 (age 31) 2 0   Inter Miami v.   Cape Verde, 11 June 2022

FW Enner Valencia (captain) (1989-11-04) 4 November 1989 (age 33) 77 38   Fenerbahçe v.   Australia, 24 March 2023 INJ
FW Romario Ibarra (1994-09-24) 24 September 1994 (age 28) 27 3   Pachuca 2022 FIFA World Cup
FW Ayrton Preciado (1994-07-17) 17 July 1994 (age 28) 27 3 Free agent 2022 FIFA World Cup
FW Djorkaeff Reasco (1999-01-18) 18 January 1999 (age 24) 5 0   Newell's Old Boys 2022 FIFA World Cup
FW Leonardo Campana (2000-07-24) 24 July 2000 (age 22) 12 0   Inter Miami v.   Cape Verde, 11 June 2022
FW Jordy Caicedo (1997-11-18) 18 November 1997 (age 25) 10 2   Sivasspor v.   Cape Verde, 11 June 2022

INJ Withdrew from the squad due to injury.
PRE Preliminary squad / standby.
RET Retired from the national team.
SUS Withdrew from the squad due to suspension.

Retired numbersEdit

Following the death of Christian Benítez, the Ecuadorian Football Federation retired his jersey number 11 from the national team. According to the Federation's then-president, Luis Chiriboga, to honor Benítez the number would no longer be used by any other team player.[24] However, due to FIFA regulations, the number had to be reinstated for the 2014 World Cup squad.[25]

Player recordsEdit

As of 29 November 2022[26]
Players in bold are still active with Ecuador.

Most appearancesEdit

 
Iván Hurtado is Ecuador's most capped player, with 168 appearances
Rank Player Caps Goals Ecuador career
1 Iván Hurtado 168 4 1992–2014
2 Walter Ayoví 122 8 2001–2017
3 Édison Méndez 112 18 2000–2014
4 Álex Aguinaga 109 23 1987–2004
5 Ulises de la Cruz 101 6 1995–2010
6 Luis Capurro 100 1 1985–2003
7 Antonio Valencia 99 11 2004–2019
8 Giovanny Espinoza 90 3 2000–2009
9 Segundo Castillo 88 9 2003–2016
José Francisco Cevallos 88 0 1994–2010

Most goalsEdit

 
Enner Valencia is Ecuador's highest scoring player
Rank Player Goals Caps Ratio Ecuador career
1 Enner Valencia 38 77 0.49 2012–present
2 Agustín Delgado 31 71 0.44 1994–2006
3 Eduardo Hurtado 26 74 0.35 1992–2002
4 Christian Benítez 25 61 0.41 2005–2013
5 Álex Aguinaga 23 109 0.21 1987–2004
6 Felipe Caicedo 22 68 0.32 2005–2017
7 Édison Méndez 18 112 0.16 2000–2014
8 Raúl Avilés 16 55 0.29 1987–1993
Iván Kaviedes 16 57 0.28 1996–2012
10 Ariel Graziani 15 34 0.44 1997–2000

Competitive recordEdit

FIFA World CupEdit

FIFA World Cup record Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad Pld W D L GF GA
  1930 Did not enter Declined participation
  1934
  1938
  1950 Withdrew Withdrew
  1954 Did not enter Declined participation
  1958
  1962 Did not qualify 2 0 0 2 3 11
  1966 5 2 1 2 7 7
  1970 4 0 1 3 2 8
  1974 4 0 2 2 3 8
  1978 4 0 1 3 1 9
  1982 4 1 1 2 2 5
  1986 4 0 1 3 2 8
  1990 4 1 1 2 4 5
  1994 8 1 3 4 7 7
  1998 16 6 3 7 22 21
    2002 Group stage 24th 3 1 0 2 2 4 Squad 18 9 4 5 23 20
  2006 Round of 16 12th 4 2 0 2 5 4 Squad 18 8 4 6 23 19
  2010 Did not qualify 18 6 5 7 22 26
  2014 Group stage 17th 3 1 1 1 3 3 Squad 16 7 4 5 20 16
  2018 Did not qualify 18 6 2 10 26 29
  2022 Group stage 18th 3 1 1 1 4 3 Squad 18 7 5 6 27 19
      2026 To be determined To be determined
Total Round of 16 4/22 13 5 2 6 14 14 161 54 38 69 194 218

Copa AméricaEdit

  Champions    Runners-up    Third place    Fourth place  

South American Championship / Copa América record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad
  1916 Did not participate
  1917
  1919
  1920
  1921
  1922
  1923
  1924
  1925
  1926
  1927
  1929
  1935
  1937
  1939 Fifth place 5th 4 0 0 4 4 18 Squad
  1941 5th 4 0 0 4 1 21 Squad
  1942 Seventh place 7th 6 0 0 6 4 31 Squad
  1945 7th 6 0 1 5 9 27 Squad
  1946 Withdrew
  1947 Sixth place 6th 7 0 3 4 3 17 Squad
  1949 Seventh place 7th 7 1 0 6 7 21 Squad
  1953 7th 6 0 2 4 1 13 Squad
  1955 Sixth place 6th 5 0 0 5 4 22 Squad
  1956 Withdrew
  1957 Seventh place 7th 6 0 1 5 7 23 Squad
  1959 Withdrew
  1959 Fourth place 4th 4 1 1 2 5 9 Squad
  1963 Sixth place 6th 6 1 2 3 14 18 Squad
  1967 Did not qualify
1975 Group stage 9th 4 0 1 3 4 10 Squad
1979 9th 4 1 0 3 4 7 Squad
1983 9th 4 0 2 2 4 10 Squad
  1987 8th 2 0 1 1 1 4 Squad
  1989 7th 4 1 2 1 2 2 Squad
  1991 7th 4 1 1 2 6 5 Squad
  1993 Fourth place 4th 6 4 0 2 13 5 Squad
  1995 Group stage 9th 3 1 0 2 2 3 Squad
  1997 Quarter-finals 5th 4 2 2 0 5 2 Squad
  1999 Group stage 11th 3 0 0 3 3 7 Squad
  2001 9th 3 1 0 2 5 5 Squad
  2004 12th 3 0 0 3 3 10 Squad
  2007 11th 3 0 0 3 3 6 Squad
  2011 10th 3 0 1 2 2 5 Squad
  2015 10th 3 1 0 2 4 6 Squad
  2016 Quarter-finals 8th 4 1 2 1 7 4 Squad
  2019 Group stage 11th 3 0 1 2 2 7 Squad
  2021 Quarter-finals 8th 5 0 3 2 5 9 Squad
  2024 Qualified
Total Fourth place 29/47 126 16 26 84 134 327

Pan American GamesEdit

Pan American Games record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1951 Did not participate
  1955
  1959
  1963
  1967
  1971
  1975
  1979
  1983
  1987
  1991
  1995 Group stage 9th 3 1 0 2 6 10
Since 1999 See Ecuador national under-23 football team
Total Group stage 1/12 3 1 0 2 6 10

Head-to-head recordEdit

Below is a result summary of all matches Ecuador have played against FIFA recognized teams.[27]

As of 28 March 2023

  Positive Record   Neutral Record   Negative Record

HonoursEdit

Despite never having won a title with their senior team, Ecuador has two relevant achievements with their youth teams.

Senior teamEdit

FriendliesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking". FIFA. 6 April 2023. Retrieved 6 April 2023.
  2. ^ Elo rankings change compared to one year ago. "World Football Elo Ratings". eloratings.net. 30 March 2023. Retrieved 30 March 2023.
  3. ^ a b El Universo (7 November 2019). "Hace 18 años Ecuador clasificó a su primer mundial de fútbol" (in Spanish). Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  4. ^ The New York Times (15 June 2006). "Ecuador Breathes the Thick Air of Victory". The New York Times. Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  5. ^ Raúl Chávez (6 July 2007). "Falta de puntería silencia a seleccionados ecuatorianos". Archived from the original on 27 December 2007. Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  6. ^ "¿Cómo llegó el fútbol a Ecuador" (in Spanish). 26 April 2013. Archived from the original on 27 June 2019. Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  7. ^ a b ecuafutbol.org. "HISTORIA DE LA FEDERACIÓN ECUATORIANA DE FÚTBOL". Archived from the original on 22 August 2018. Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  8. ^ "Ecuador en la Copa Mundo". Archived from the original on 18 June 2008. Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  9. ^ José Luis Pierrend, Alfonzo Cornejo. "Bolivarian Games: Soccer Tournaments". RSSSF. Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  10. ^ a b El Universo (15 May 2002). "Otra primera vez, Ecuador venció a Brasil" (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 6 February 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2020.
  11. ^ El Universo (9 June 2002). "Tin Delgado, un goleador mundial..." (in Spanish). Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  12. ^ El Universo (16 June 2016). "Ecuador cayó 2-1 ante Estados Unidos y se despidió de la Copa América 2016" (in Spanish). Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  13. ^ infobae.com (31 July 2019). "A menos de un año de su presentación, Hernán Darío Gómez dejó de ser el técnico de Ecuador" (in Spanish).
  14. ^ "The CAS confirms the eligibility of the player Byron Castillo (Ecuador) but imposes sanctions against the Ecuadorian Football Federation for a violation of the FIFA regulations" (PDF). Court of Arbitration for Sport. 8 November 2022.
  15. ^ AFA (30 January 2017). "Conocé el Estadio Olímpico Atahualpa". Retrieved 5 May 2020.
  16. ^ El Telégrafo (8 October 2016). "El marcador del Atahualpa también celebra las victorias de Ecuador". Archived from the original on 19 October 2018. Retrieved 5 May 2020.
  17. ^ El Universo (14 June 2012). "Ecuador comenzó estudios para modernizar los estadios para 2023". Retrieved 5 May 2020.
  18. ^ "El estadio Olímpico Atahualpa será demolido a finales del 2020 y se levantará otro estadio con mayor capacidad" (in Spanish). 13 January 2020. Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  19. ^ "Ya es oficial: Ecuador no será sede de la Copa América 2024". El Universo (in Spanish). 9 November 2022. Retrieved 10 November 2022.
  20. ^ "Federación Ecuatoriana de Fútbol, el portal de fútbol ecuatoriano". Archived from the original on 1 November 2013. Retrieved 12 November 2013.
  21. ^ "SportsLogos.Net - CONMEBOL Logos - CONMEBOL Logos - the News and History of Sports Logos and Uniforms".
  22. ^ underconsideration.com (31 January 2020). "Flight of the Condor". Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  23. ^ @LaTri (16 March 2023). "𝗘𝗟𝗟𝗢𝗦 𝗦𝗢𝗡 𝗟𝗢𝗦 𝗖𝗢𝗡𝗩𝗢𝗖𝗔𝗗𝗢𝗦" (Tweet) (in Spanish). Retrieved 16 March 2023 – via Twitter.
  24. ^ "NÚMERO 11 DE ECUADOR SIEMPRE SERÁ DE CHUCHO". Federación Ecuatoriana de Fútbol (in Spanish). ecuafutbol.org. 1 August 2013. Archived from the original on 19 August 2013.
  25. ^ "Soccer-Ecuador to reinstate Benitez's number 11 for World Cup". reuters.com. 6 March 2014.
  26. ^ "Ecuador - International Appearances by Player". RSSSF.
  27. ^ "World Football Elo Ratings: Ecuador".

External linksEdit