Senegal national football team

The Senegal national football team (French: Équipe de football du Senegal), nicknamed the Lions of Teranga, represents Senegal in international association football and is operated by the Senegalese Football Federation.

Senegal
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Lions of Teranga
AssociationSenegalese Football Federation
ConfederationCAF (Africa)
Sub-confederationWAFU (West Africa)
Head coachAliou Cissé
CaptainKalidou Koulibaly
Most capsHenri Camara (99)
Top scorerSadio Mané (34)
Home stadiumDiamniadio Olympic Stadium
FIFA codeSEN
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 18 Steady (25 August 2022)[1]
Highest18 (February 2022)
Lowest99 (June 2013)
First international
 British Gambia 1–2 French Senegal Flag of Senegal (1958–1959).svg
(The Gambia; 1959)
Biggest win
 Senegal 10–1 Mauritania 
(Senegal; 28 September 1972)
Biggest defeat
 Guinea 5–0 Senegal 
(Guinea; 6 March 1966)
World Cup
Appearances3 (first in 2002)
Best resultQuarter-finals (2002)
Africa Cup of Nations
Appearances16 (first in 1965)
Best resultChampions (2021)
African Nations Championship
Appearances2 (first in 2009)
Best resultFourth place (2009)
Amílcar Cabral Cup
Appearances19 (first in 1979)
Best resultChampions (1979, 1980, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1991, 2001)

Senegal advanced to the quarter-finals of the 2002 FIFA World Cup, becoming the second team from Africa (behind Cameroon in 1990). They managed to upset defending world champions France, draw with Denmark and Uruguay, and beat Sweden in extra time in the round of 16, before losing to Turkey in the quarter-finals.

Senegal’s first appearance in the Africa Cup of Nations was in 1965, when they, after being group runners-up, lost 1–0 to Ivory Coast for 4th place. They hosted the 1992 African Cup of Nations, where they made it to the quarter-finals. They won their first international trophy at the 2021 Africa Cup of Nations, defeating Egypt in the final.

HistoryEdit

Early historyEdit

Senegal gained its independence from France on 4 April 1960, and the Senegalese Football Federation (FSF) was founded that year. The first Senegal match took place on 31 December 1961 against Dahomey (now Benin), a 3–2 loss. The FSF has been affiliated with FIFA since 1962 and has been a member of the Confederation of African Football (CAF) since 1963. Senegal's first appearance in the Africa Cup of Nations was in 1965, where they finished second in their group, and lost 1–0 to Ivory Coast to finish in fourth place. After a group stage exit at the AFCON three years later, they would not qualify for the tournament until 1986.

1990s and 2000sEdit

In the 1990 Africa Cup of Nations, Senegal finished fourth; they hosted the 1992 tournament, where after finishing second in their group, they were eliminated by Cameroon in the quarterfinals. Senegal lost the 2002 final on a penalty shootout after drawing 0–0 with Cameroon.[3] Later that year, Senegal made their debut appearance at the World Cup. After defeating defending world champions France in their opening game, they drew with Denmark and Uruguay to progress from the group stage, then beat Sweden in extra time in the round of 16 to reach the quarter-finals, one of only three African teams to do so (alongside Cameroon in 1990 and Ghana in 2010). There, they lost to Turkey in extra time.[4][5]

Senegal qualified for the 2008 Africa Cup of Nations, but finished third in their group with two points. They failed to make the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa, the first World Cup to be held in Africa.

2010sEdit

Senegal was eliminated from the 2012 Africa Cup of Nations with zero wins and zero points.

After former manager Bruno Metsu died on 14 October 2013, many Senegalese players were recalled to appear and have a moment of silence in memory of the manager who helped them reach the quarter-final in the 2002 World Cup. All activities of the national league and the national team were suspended for a few days in his memory.

The West African nation narrowly missed the 2014 FIFA World Cup after losing in a round-robin match against Ivory Coast in the final qualification round. Senegal qualified for two Africa Cup of Nations tournaments before the next World Cup, being eliminated in the group stage in 2015 and reaching the quarterfinals in 2017. On 10 November 2017, after defeating South Africa 2–0,[6] Senegal qualified for the 2018 FIFA World Cup,[7] their first since 2002.[8] Senegal defeated Poland 2–1 in their opening group match,[9] thanks to an own goal by Thiago Cionek and a M'Baye Niang strike.[10] In the next group stage match, Senegal drew 2–2 against Japan, with goals from Sadio Mané and Moussa Wagué.[11] A 1–0 loss to Colombia in their final match[12] meant they finished level on points with Japan, who progressed thanks to a superior fair play record.[13] Thus, Senegal was eliminated in the group stage for the first time in its World Cup history.[14]

Aliou Cissé, who participated in the 2002 AFCON, managed Senegal to a runner-up campaign in the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations.[15] Having lost 1–0 to Algeria earlier in the tournament, Senegal lost 1–0 to them again in the final.[16][17]

2020sEdit

Deprived of many players due to COVID-19, Senegal participated in the 2021 Africa Cup of Nations, postponed to 2022 because of the pandemic; they beat Zimbabwe in their first match 1–0 and drew their next two games, enough to finish first in their group.[18] In the round of 16, Senegal faced Cape Verde. Mané recorded a shot that hit the post in the first minute. Patrick Andrade was sent off in the 21st minute, after intervention of the video assistant referee. Despite their dominance, the first half ended without a single shot on target; Mané opened the scoring a few minutes into the second half, following a corner.

Senegal faced Equatorial Guinea in the quarter-finals. The Lions opened the scoring half an hour into the game, by Famara Diédhiou on a pass from Mané; Senegal eventually won 3–1.[19] In the semi-finals, Senegal faced Burkina Faso, winning 3–1 again.[20] In the final, Senegal faced Egypt, who eliminated hosts Cameroon in the semi-finals. In a penalty shootout, Mané scored the winning penalty,[21] to bring Senegal its first Africa Cup of Nations title.[22] Senegal returned home and took part in a victory parade that took place in the capital, Dakar. It ended up becoming the biggest party in the country's history.[23]

Senegal faced Egypt twice after the AFCON final, eliminating the Egyptians on penalties after being tied 1–1 on aggregate, to qualify for the 2022 FIFA World Cup. Mané eliminated his Liverpool teammate Mohamed Salah after scoring the winning penalty again.[24]

Kit historyEdit

Puma has been the manufacturer of Senegal's kits since 2004. The home kit is typically white, and the away kit is green.

 
Supporters wearing the away kit.
Kit providers Period
  Adidas 1980–2000
  Erreà 2000–2002
  Le Coq Sportif 2002–2004
  Puma 2004–2016
  Romai[25] 2017
  Puma 2017–present

Results and fixturesEdit

The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

  Win   Draw   Loss

2021Edit

1 September 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Senegal   2–0   Togo Thiès
16:00 UTC±0
  • Mané   56'
  • A. Diallo   81'
Report Stadium: Stade Lat-Dior
Attendance: 0
Referee: Sadok Selmi (Tunisia)
7 September 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Congo   1–3   Senegal Brazzaville
17:00 UTC+1
Report
Stadium: Stade Alphonse Massamba-Débat
Attendance: 0
Referee: Mohamed Ali Moussa (Niger)
9 October 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Senegal   4–1   Namibia Thiès
19:00 UTC±0
Report
Stadium: Stade Lat-Dior
Referee: Kalilou Traoré (Ivory Coast)
12 October 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Namibia   1–3   Senegal Johannesburg, South Africa
15:00 UTC+2
Report
Stadium: Orlando Stadium
Referee: Mohamed Youssouf Athoumani (Comoros)
11 November 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Togo   1–1   Senegal Lomé
19:00 UTC±0 Nane   45+1' Report Diallo   90+4' Stadium: Stade de Kégué
Referee: Jalal Jayed (Morocco)
14 November 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Senegal   2–0   Congo Thiès, Senegal
21:00 UTC+2
Report Stadium: Stade Lat-Dior
Referee: Fabricio Duarte (Cape Verde)

2022Edit

2 January Friendly Rwanda   Cancelled   Senegal TBD, Rwanda
19:00 UTC±0 Stadium: TBD
10 January 2021 AFCON GS Senegal   1–0   Zimbabwe Bafoussam, Cameroon
14:00 UTC+1
Report Stadium: Kouekong Stadium
Referee: Mario Escobar (Guatemala)
14 January 2021 AFCON GS Senegal   0–0   Guinea Bafoussam, Cameroon
14:00 UTC+1 Report Stadium: Kouekong Stadium
Referee: Bamlak Tessema Weyesa (Ethiopia)
18 January 2021 AFCON GS Malawi   0–0   Senegal Bafoussam, Cameroon
17:00 UTC+1 Report Stadium: Kouekong Stadium
Referee: Blaise Yuven Ngwa (Cameroon)
25 January 2021 AFCON R16 Senegal   2–0   Cape Verde Bafoussam, Cameroon
17:00 UTC+1
Report Stadium: Kouekong Stadium
Referee: Lahlou Benbraham (Algeria)
30 January 2021 AFCON QF Senegal   3–1   Equatorial Guinea Yaoundé, Cameroon
20:00 UTC+1
Report
Stadium: Ahmadou Ahidjo Stadium
Referee: Victor Gomes (South Africa)
2 February 2021 AFCON SF Burkina Faso   1–3   Senegal Yaoundé, Cameroon
20:00 UTC+1
Report
Stadium: Ahmadou Ahidjo Stadium
Referee: Bamlak Tessema Weyesa (Ethiopia)
6 February 2021 AFCON Final Senegal   0–0 (a.e.t.)
(4–2 p)
  Egypt Yaoundé, Cameroon
20:00 UTC+1 Report Stadium: Olembe Stadium
Referee: Victor Gomes (South Africa)
Penalties
29 March 2022 WC QLF 2nd Leg Senegal   1–0 (a.e.t.)
(1–1 agg.)
(3–1 p)
  Egypt Dakar, Senegal
Report Stadium: Stade Léopold Sédar Senghor
Referee: Mustapha Ghorbal (Algeria)
Penalties
4 June 2023 AFCON QLF Senegal   3–1   Benin Dakar, Senegal
19:00
Report
Stadium: Diamniadio Olympic Stadium
Referee: Alaa Sabry (Egypt)
7 June 2023 AFCON QLF Rwanda   0–1   Senegal Dakar, Senegal
21:00 UTC+2 Report
Stadium: Diamniadio Olympic Stadium
Referee: Jean-Jacques Ndala (Congo DR)
13 July 2022 COSAFA Cup QF Senegal   1–1
(10–9 p)
  Eswatini Durban, South Africa
Stadium: Princess Magogo Stadium
17 July 2022 COSAFA Cup 3rd-place match Mozambique   1–1
(2–4 p)
  Senegal Durban, South Africa
Stadium: Moses Mabhida Stadium
24 September Friendly Bolivia   0–2   Senegal Orléans, France
Report
Stadium: Stade de la Source
Referee: Bastien Dechepy (France)
27 September Friendly Iran   1–1   Senegal Maria Enzersdorf, Austria
16:30 UTC+2 Azmoun   64' Report Pouraliganji   55' (og) Stadium: Motion invest Arena
Referee: Harald Lechner (Austria)
15 November Friendly Senegal   v   Kazakhstan TBD, United Arab Emirates
Stadium: TBD
21 November 2022 FIFA World Cup Senegal   v   Netherlands Doha, Qatar
13:00 UTC+3 Stadium: Al Thumama Stadium
25 November 2022 FIFA World Cup Qatar   v   Senegal Doha, Qatar
16:00 UTC+3 Stadium: Al Thumama Stadium
29 November 2022 FIFA World Cup Ecuador   v   Senegal Al Rayyan, Qatar
18:00 UTC+3 Stadium: Khalifa International Stadium

2023Edit

March 2023 AFCON qualification Senegal   v   Mozambique Senegal
--:-- UTC±0 Report
March 2023 AFCON qualification Mozambique   v   Senegal Mozambique
--:-- UTC+2 Report
September 2023 AFCON qualification Benin   v   Senegal
September 2023 AFCON qualification Senegal   v   Rwanda

Coaching staffEdit

 
Aliou Cissé has served as the team's manager since 2015.
Position Name
Head Coach   Aliou Cissé
Assistant Coach   Régis Bogaert
Assistant Coach II   Naby Traoré
Goalkeeping Coach   Tony Sylva
Team Coordinator   Lamine Diatta
Physical Trainer   Djibril Yattar
Media Officer   Ciré Soumare
Technical Director   Mayacine Mar
Team Doctor   Abdourahmane Fédior

Coaching historyEdit

Manager Period Honours
  Raoul Diagne 1960–1961
  Jules Vandooren 1961–1963
  Habib Bâ
  Lybasse Diop
1963–1965   1965 Africa Cup of Nations – Fourth place
  Lamine Diack 1965–1968   1968 Africa Cup of Nations – Group stage
  Otto Pfister 1979–1982
  Pape Alioune Diop 1982–1986   1986 Africa Cup of Nations – Group stage
  1986 FIFA World Cup – Failed to qualify
  Mawade Wade 1986–1989   1988 Africa Cup of Nations – Failed to qualify
  1990 FIFA World Cup – Failed to qualify
  Claude Le Roy 1989–1992   1990 Africa Cup of Nations – Fourth place
  1992 Africa Cup of Nations – Quarter-finals
  Lamine Dieng 1992–1993
  Boubacar Sarr 1993–1994   1994 FIFA World Cup – Failed to qualify
  Jules Bocandé
  Boubacar Sarr
1994–1995   1994 Africa Cup of Nations – Quarter-finals
  1996 Africa Cup of Nations – Failed to qualify
  Peter Schnittger 1995–2000   1998 Africa Cup of Nations – Failed to qualify
  1998 FIFA World Cup – Failed to qualify
  2000 Africa Cup of Nations – Quarter-finals
  Bruno Metsu 2000–2002   2002 African Cup of Nations – Runners-up
  2002 FIFA World Cup – Quarter-finals
  Guy Stéphan 2002–2005   2004 Africa Cup of Nations – Quarter-finals
  2006 FIFA World Cup – Failed to qualify
  Abdoulaye Sarr 2005–2006   2006 Africa Cup of Nations – Fourth place
  Henryk Kasperczak 2006–2008   2008 Africa Cup of Nations – Group stage
  Lamine N'Diaye 2008
  Amsatou Fall 2009   2010 Africa Cup of Nations – Failed to qualify
  2010 FIFA World Cup – Failed to qualify
  Amara Traoré 2009–2012   2012 Africa Cup of Nations – Group stage
  Karim Séga Diouf
  Aliou Cissé
2012
  Joseph Koto 2012   2013 Africa Cup of Nations – Failed to qualify
  Mayacine Mar 2012–2013   2014 FIFA World Cup – Failed to qualify
  Alain Giresse 2013–2015   2015 Africa Cup of Nations – Group stage
  Aliou Cissé 2015–present   2017 Africa Cup of Nations – Quarter-finals
  2018 FIFA World Cup – Group stage
  2019 Africa Cup of Nations – Runners-up
  2021 Africa Cup of NationsChampions
  2022 FIFA World CupQualified

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

The following players were called up for the two friendly matches against Bolivia and Iran on 24 and 27 of September, respectively.[26] On 17 September, Keita Baldé received a 3 months suspension due to an anti-doping test violation and was left out the squad.[27] On 19 September, Édouard Mendy and Noah Fadiga suffered from an injury and withdrewed from the call up.[28] Habib Diallo was additionally called up to the squad on the same day.[29]

Caps and goals correct as of 24 September 2022, after the match against Bolivia.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Seny Dieng (1994-11-23) 23 November 1994 (age 27) 3 0   Queens Park Rangers
23 1GK Alfred Gomis (1993-09-05) 5 September 1993 (age 29) 14 0   Rennes
28 1GK Mory Diaw (1993-06-22) 22 June 1993 (age 29) 0 0   Clermont

2 2DF Formose Mendy (2001-01-02) 2 January 2001 (age 21) 1 0   Amiens
3 2DF Kalidou Koulibaly (captain) (1991-06-20) 20 June 1991 (age 31) 63 0   Chelsea
4 2DF Pape Abou Cissé (1995-09-14) 14 September 1995 (age 27) 12 1   Olympiacos
22 2DF Abdou Diallo (1996-05-04) 4 May 1996 (age 26) 18 2   RB Leipzig
12 2DF Fodé Ballo-Touré (1997-01-03) 3 January 1997 (age 25) 14 0   Milan
13 2DF Ismail Jakobs (1999-08-17) 17 August 1999 (age 23) 1 0   Monaco
19 2DF Moussa Niakhaté (1996-03-08) 8 March 1996 (age 26) 0 0   Nottingham Forrest

5 3MF Idrissa Gueye (vice-captain) (1989-09-26) 26 September 1989 (age 33) 95 7   Everton
6 3MF Nampalys Mendy (1992-06-23) 23 June 1992 (age 30) 18 0   Leicester City
8 3MF Cheikhou Kouyaté (1989-12-21) 21 December 1989 (age 32) 82 4   Nottingham Forest
11 3MF Pathé Ciss (1994-03-16) 16 March 1994 (age 28) 1 0   Rayo Vallecano
15 3MF Krépin Diatta (1999-02-25) 25 February 1999 (age 23) 25 2   Monaco
17 3MF Pape Matar Sarr (2002-09-14) 14 September 2002 (age 20) 8 0   Tottenham Hotspur
24 3MF Moustapha Name (1995-05-05) 5 May 1995 (age 27) 6 0   Pafos
25 3MF Mamadou Loum (1996-12-30) 30 December 1996 (age 25) 3 0   Reading
26 3MF Pape Gueye (1999-01-24) 24 January 1999 (age 23) 11 0   Marseille

9 4FW Boulaye Dia (1996-11-16) 16 November 1996 (age 25) 18 3   Salernitana
10 4FW Sadio Mané (1992-04-10) 10 April 1992 (age 30) 92 34   Bayern Munich
18 4FW Ismaïla Sarr (1998-02-25) 25 February 1998 (age 24) 47 10   Watford
20 4FW Bamba Dieng (2000-03-23) 23 March 2000 (age 22) 12 2   Marseille
21 4FW Iliman Ndiaye (2000-03-06) 6 March 2000 (age 22) 1 0   Sheffield United
27 4FW Nicolas Jackson (2001-06-20) 20 June 2001 (age 21) 0 0   Villarreal
29 4FW Demba Seck (2001-02-10) 10 February 2001 (age 21) 1 0   Torino
4FW Habib Diallo (1995-06-18) 18 June 1995 (age 27) 14 2   Strasbourg

Recent call-upsEdit

The following players have been called up for Senegal in the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Édouard Mendy (1992-03-01) 1 March 1992 (age 30) 25 0   Chelsea v.   Bolivia, 24 September 2022INJ
GK Alioune Badara Faty (1999-05-03)3 May 1999 (aged 22) 0 0   Casa Sports v.   Egypt, 29 March 2022
GK Bingourou Kamara (1996-10-21) 21 October 1996 (age 25) 2 0   Montpellier v.   Egypt, 29 March 2022

DF Noah Fadiga (1999-12-03) 3 December 1999 (age 22) 0 0   Brest v.   Bolivia, 24 September 2022INJ
DF Saliou Ciss (1989-09-15) 15 September 1989 (age 33) 37 0 Free agent v.   Rwanda, 7 June 2022
DF Youssouf Sabaly (1993-03-05) 5 March 1993 (age 29) 24 0   Real Betis v.   Rwanda, 7 June 2022INJ
DF Abdoulaye Seck (1992-06-04) 4 June 1992 (age 30) 5 0   Maccabi Haifa v.   Rwanda, 7 June 2022
DF Alpha Diounkou (2001-10-10) 10 October 2001 (age 20) 0 0   Barcelona B v.   Rwanda, 7 June 2022
DF Bouna Sarr (1992-01-31) 31 January 1992 (age 30) 13 0   Bayern Munich v.   Egypt, 29 March 2022INJ
DF Ibrahima Mbaye (1994-11-19) 19 November 1994 (age 27) 8 0   CFR Cluj 2021 Africa Cup of Nations

MF Joseph Lopy (1992-03-15) 15 March 1992 (age 30) 7 0   Sochaux 2021 Africa Cup of NationsINJ
MF Boubakary Soumaré (1999-02-27) 27 February 1999 (age 23) 0 0   Leicester City Training camp, February 2022

FW Keita Baldé (1995-03-08) 8 March 1995 (age 27) 40 6   Spartak Moscow v.   Bolivia, 24 September 2022SUS
FW Famara Diédhiou (1992-12-15) 15 December 1992 (age 29) 24 10   Alanyaspor v.   Rwanda, 7 June 2022INJ
FW Mame Thiam (1992-10-09) 9 October 1992 (age 29) 4 0   Kayserispor v.   Egypt, 29 March 2022

DEC Player refused to join the team after the call-up.
INJ Player withdrew from the squad due to an injury.
PRE Preliminary squad.
RET Player has retired from international football.
SUS Suspended from the national team.

Player recordsEdit

As of 27 September 2022[30]
Players in bold are still active with Senegal.

Most appearancesEdit

Rank Player Caps Goals Career
1 Henri Camara 99 29 1999–2008
2 Idrissa Gueye 96 7 2011–present
3 Sadio Mané 93 34 2012–present
4 Roger Mendy 87 3 1979–1995
5 Tony Sylva 83 0 1999–2008
Cheikhou Kouyaté 83 4 2012–present
7 Jules Bocandé 73 20 1979–1993
8 Lamine Diatta 71 4 2000–2008
9 El Hadji Diouf 70 24 2000–2008
10 Papa Bouba Diop 63 11 2001–2008

Top goalscorersEdit

 
Sadio Mané is Senegal's top scorer with 34 goals.
Rank Player Goals Caps Ratio Career
1 Sadio Mané 34 93 0.37 2012–present
2 Henri Camara 29 99 0.29 1999–2008
3 El Hadji Diouf 24 70 0.34 2000–2008
4 Mamadou Niang 20 54 0.37 2002–2012
Jules Bocandé 20 73 0.27 1979–1993
6 Moussa Sow 18 50 0.36 2009–2018
7 Papiss Cissé 17 36 0.47 2009–2015
8 Mamadou Diallo 15 35 0.43 1989–1999
9 Moussa Konaté 12 34 0.35 2012–present
10 Souleymane Sané 11 23 0.48 1990–1997
Papa Bouba Diop 11 63 0.17 2001–2008

Competitive recordEdit

FIFA World CupEdit

Senegal have appeared in the finals of the FIFA World Cup on three occasions, in 2002 where they reached the quarter finals,[31] in 2018, and in 2022.

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Squad Pld W D L GF GA
  1930 Part of   France Declined participation
  1934
  1938
  1950
  1954
  1958
  1962
  1966
  1970 Did not qualify 3 1 0 2 2 4
  1974 2 0 1 1 1 2
  1978 2 0 1 1 1 2
  1982 2 0 1 1 0 1
  1986 2 1 0 1 1 1
  1990 Did not enter Declined participation
  1994 Did not qualify 8 3 1 4 11 12
  1998 2 0 1 1 2 3
    2002 Quarter-finals 7th 5 2 2 1 7 6 Squad 10 5 4 1 16 3
  2006 Did not qualify 10 6 3 1 21 8
  2010 6 2 3 1 9 7
  2014 8 3 4 1 11 8
  2018 Group stage 17th 3 1 1 1 4 4 Squad 8 5 3 0 15 5
  2022 Qualified 8 6 1 1 16 5
      2026 To be determined To be determined
Total Quarter-finals 3/22 8 3 3 2 11 10 71 32 23 16 106 61

Africa Cup of NationsEdit

Historically, Senegal was seen as a weaker side in the strong West African region. Although they finished in fourth place in two AFCON editions,[32] Senegalese performance was overall still deemed as poor. Senegal remained under the shadow of West African giants Nigeria, Ivory Coast and Ghana for the majority of the 20th century.

In the 2000s, Senegal began to surge and became a more competitive opponent in the Africa Cup of Nations. Following a successful FIFA World Cup debut in 2002, in which the side reached the quarter-finals, Senegal established itself as a new powerhouse in Africa. The 2002 Africa Cup of Nations tournament marked a defeat to Cameroon 2–3 on penalties after a goalless draw in the final.[33] Senegal once again finished as runners-up in 2019, losing the final 0–1 to Algeria,[34] and finally won their first AFCON title in 2021.

 
Senegalese fans at the 2008 Africa Cup of Nations against Tunisia
Africa Cup of Nations record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Squad
  1957 Part of   France
  1959
  1962 Not affiliated to CAF
  1963
  1965 Fourth place 4th 3 1 1 1 5 2 Squad
  1968 Group stage 5th 3 1 1 1 5 5 Squad
  1970 Did not qualify
  1972
  1974
  1976
  1978
  1980 Did not enter
  1982 Did not qualify
  1984
  1986 Group stage 5th 3 2 0 1 3 1 Squad
  1988 Did not qualify
  1990 Fourth place 4th 5 1 2 2 3 3 Squad
  1992 Quarter-finals 5th 3 1 0 2 4 3 Squad
  1994 Quarter-finals 8th 3 1 0 2 2 3 Squad
  1996 Did not qualify
  1998
   2000 Quarter-finals 7th 4 1 1 2 6 6 Squad
  2002 Runners-up 2nd 6 4 2 0 6 1 Squad
  2004 Quarter-finals 6th 4 1 2 1 4 2 Squad
  2006 Fourth place 4th 6 2 0 4 7 8 Squad
  2008 Group stage 12th 3 0 2 1 4 6 Squad
  2010 Did not qualify
   2012 Group stage 13th 3 0 0 3 3 6 Squad
  2013 Did not qualify
  2015 Group stage 9th 3 1 1 1 3 4 Squad
  2017 Quarter-finals 5th 4 2 2 0 6 2 Squad
  2019 Runners-up 2nd 7 5 0 2 8 2 Squad
  2021 Champions 1st 7 4 3 0 9 2 Squad
  2023 To be determined
  2025
Total 1 Title 16/33 67 27 17 23 78 56

African Nations ChampionshipEdit

African Nations Championship record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Squad
  2009 Fourth place 4th 5 1 3 1 3 3 Squad
  2011 Group stage 10th 3 1 1 1 2 2 Squad
  2014 Did not qualify
  2016
  2018
  2020
  2022 Qualified
Total Fourth place 2/6 8 2 4 2 5 5

Amílcar Cabral CupEdit

Amílcar Cabral Cup record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA
  1979 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 7 1
  1980 Champions 1st 4 3 0 1 5 3
  1981 Third place 3rd 4 3 0 1 7 2
  1982 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 1 1 5 1
  1983 Champions 1st 5 3 2 0 9 4
  1984 Champions 1st 5 3 1 1 10 3
  1985 Champions 1st 5 4 1 0 8 2
  1986 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 7 2
  1987 Third place 3rd 4 1 1 2 2 2
  1988 Third place 3rd 5 2 3 0 10 5
  1989 Group stage 6th 3 0 2 1 3 4
  1991 Champions 1st 4 3 1 0 7 0
  1993 Runners-up 2nd 5 2 1 2 6 3
  1995 Group stage 5th 3 1 1 1 5 3
  1997 Runners-up 2nd 5 2 2 1 5 3
  2000 Runners-up 2nd 5 1 3 1 8 6
  2001 Champions 1st 4 3 1 0 11 3
  2005 Runners-up 2nd 4 1 2 1 3 3
  2007 Third place 3rd 4 2 1 1 5 4
Total 8 Titles 19/19 82 45 25 14 123 54

WAFU Nations CupEdit

WAFU Nations Cup record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA
  2010 Runners-up 2nd 5 2 1 2 4 4
  2011 Withdrew
  2013 Runners-up 2nd 4 3 0 1 8 4
  2017 Group stage 5th 4 1 2 1 5 2
  2019 Champions 1st 4 3 1 0 7 2
  2021 To be determined
Total 1 Title 4/5 17 9 4 4 24 12

Other recordsEdit

Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA
  1963 Friendship Games Champions 1st 4 3 1 0 12 3
  Jeux de la Francophonie 2005 Runners-up 2nd 6 5 0 1 11 3
  2015 African Games Champions 1st 4 2 2 0 5 2
  2021 COSAFA Cup Runners-up 2nd 6 3 2 1 8 6
Total 2 Titles 1st 20 13 5 2 36 14

Head-to-head recordEdit

The list shown below shows the Senegal national football team all−time international record against opposing nations.

As of 27 September 2022 after match against   Iran.

Key
  Positive balance (more wins than losses)
  Neutral balance (as many wins as losses)
  Negative balance (more losses than wins)

HonoursEdit

Last updated 6 February 2022

  Champions: 2021
  Runners-up: 2002, 2019
  Gold Medal: 2015
  Champions: 1979, 1980, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1991, 2001
  Runners-up: 1982, 1993, 1997, 2000, 2005
  Champions: 2019
  Runners-up: 2010, 2013
  Champions: 1963
  Runners-up: 2005
  Runners-up: 2021

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking". FIFA. 25 August 2022. Retrieved 25 August 2022.
  2. ^ Elo rankings change compared to one year ago. "World Football Elo Ratings". eloratings.net. 27 September 2022. Retrieved 27 September 2022.
  3. ^ "BBC SPORT | CUP OF NATIONS | Cameroon retain Cup". BBC News. 10 February 2002. Archived from the original on 30 March 2009. Retrieved 7 July 2012.
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