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The 2013 Africa Cup of Nations, also known as the Orange Africa Cup of Nations South Africa 2013 for sponsorship reasons, held from 19 January to 10 February 2013, was the 29th Africa Cup of Nations, the football championship of Africa organized by the Confederation of African Football (CAF).[1] Starting from this edition, the tournament was switched to being held in odd-numbered years instead of even-numbered years so that it does not clash with the FIFA World Cup.[2]

2013 Africa Cup of Nations
  • Afrika-nasiesbeker 2013
  • Afrika Inkomishi ave Isizwe 2013
  • AFCON 2013
  • CAN 2013
2013 Africa Cup of Nations.png
Tournament logo
Tournament details
Host countrySouth Africa
Dates19 January – 10 February
Teams16 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s)5 (in 5 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Nigeria (3rd title)
Runners-up Burkina Faso
Third place Mali
Fourth place Ghana
Tournament statistics
Matches played32
Goals scored69 (2.16 per match)
Attendance729,000 (22,781 per match)
Top scorer(s)Nigeria Emmanuel Emenike
Ghana Wakaso Mubarak
(4 goals each)
Best player(s)Burkina Faso Jonathan Pitroipa
2012
2015

South Africa hosted the tournament for the second time, after previously hosting the 1996 African Cup of Nations. The 2013 tournament is the highest attended edition of the Africa Cup of Nations under the current, 16-team format. The South African team was eliminated in the quarter-finals by Mali, following a penalty shoot-out. Zambia were the defending champions, but were eliminated in the group stage.

Nigeria won its third Africa Cup of Nations championship with a 1–0 victory over Burkina Faso in the final. Nigeria participated in the 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup in Brazil as the representative from CAF.[3]

Contents

Host selectionEdit

Bids :

Rejected Bids :

On 4 September 2006, the Confederation of African Football (CAF) approved a compromise between rival countries to host the Africa Cup of Nations after it ruled out Nigeria. CAF agreed to award the next three editions from 2010 to Angola, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and Libya respectively. They assigned Angola in 2010, Equatorial Guinea and Gabon, which submitted a joint bid in 2012, and Libya for 2014.

This edition was awarded to Libya for the second time after 1982 African Cup of Nations.

Two-time former host Nigeria is the reserve host for the 2010, 2012 and 2014 tournaments, in the event that any of the host countries fails to meet the requirements established by CAF.

The 2014 tournament was pushed forward to 2013 and subsequently held in odd-numbered years to avoid year-clash with the FIFA World Cup.[2]

Libyan withdrawalEdit

Due to the Libyan Civil War, Libya traded years with South Africa, so that South Africa hosted in 2013 and Libya will be hosting in 2017. This was ratified in September 2011 at CAF's Executive Committee in Cairo, Egypt.[4]

QualificationEdit

A total of 47 countries entered the qualification, including South Africa, which automatically qualified. Libya was not allowed to keep its automatic qualification after being stripped of its hosting rights due to the Libyan Civil War. Many teams made their return to the finals in this tournament. The hosts, South Africa returned after a 4-year absence. Ethiopia appeared for the first time since 1982 (a 31-year absence). Other teams absent from the 2012 finals that featured in 2013 were Nigeria, Togo, DR Congo, and Algeria. Cape Verde made its finals debut. Teams that didn't qualify for this tournament from the 2012 African Cup of Nations were both co-hosts, Gabon and Equatorial Guinea, Libya, Senegal, Sudan, Guinea and Botswana. South Sudan was ineligible to participate as the qualifying competition had already started by the time its membership of CAF was confirmed.

Qualified nationsEdit

 
A map of Africa showing the qualified nations, highlighted by stage reached.
Country Qualified as Qualification date Previous appearances in tournament
  South Africa 00Hosts 0028 September 2011 7 (1996, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008)
  Ghana 00Winner against Malawi 0113 October 2012 18 (1963, 1965, 1968, 1970, 1978, 1980, 1982, 1984, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012)
  Mali 00Winner against Botswana 0113 October 2012 7 (1972, 1994, 2002, 2004, 2008, 2010, 2012)
  Zambia 00Winner against Uganda 0113 October 2012 15 (1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012)
  Nigeria 00Winner against Liberia 0113 October 2012 16 (1963, 1976, 1978, 1980, 1982, 1984, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1994, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010)
  Tunisia 00Winner against Sierra Leone 0113 October 2012 15 (1962, 1963, 1965, 1978, 1982, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012)
  Ivory Coast 00Winner against Senegal 0113 October 2012 19 (1965, 1968, 1970, 1974, 1980, 1984, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012)
  Morocco 00Winner against Mozambique 0113 October 2012 14 (1972, 1976, 1978, 1980, 1986, 1988, 1992, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2012)
  Ethiopia 00Winner against Sudan 0214 October 2012 9 (1957, 1959, 1962, 1963, 1965, 1968, 1970, 1976, 1982)
  Cape Verde 00Winner against Cameroon 0214 October 2012 0 (debut)
  Angola 00Winner against Zimbabwe 0214 October 2012 6 (1996, 1998, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012)
  Niger 00Winner against Guinea 0214 October 2012 1 (2012)
  Togo 00Winner against Gabon 0214 October 2012 6 (1972, 1984, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2006)
  DR Congo 00Winner against Equatorial Guinea 0214 October 2012 15 (1965, 1968, 1970, 1972, 1974, 1976, 1988, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006)
  Burkina Faso 00Winner against Central African Rep. 0214 October 2012 8 (1978, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2010, 2012)
  Algeria 00Winner against Libya 0214 October 2012 14 (1968, 1980, 1982, 1984, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2010)
Bold indicates champion for that year
Italic indicates host

VenuesEdit

Host citiesEdit

The South African Football Association opened bidding to all 2010 FIFA World Cup host cities[5] however a maximum of seven venues would be used.[6] The final list of stadiums was initially to be announced by 30 March,[7] but was pushed back to 4 April,[8] 20 April, and then 3 May 2012.[9]

The venues were announced on 4 May 2012. FNB Stadium hosted the opening match and the final.[10] The other venues selected for matches were Mbombela Stadium, Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Royal Bafokeng Stadium and Moses Mabhida Stadium.[11]

The average daytime temperature of the host cities ranges from 25.0 °C (77.0 °F) to 30.3 °C (86.5 °F).[12]

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX
Johannesburg1 Durban1 Port Elizabeth1
FNB Stadium23 Moses Mabhida Stadium Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium
26°14′5.27″S 27°58′56.47″E / 26.2347972°S 27.9823528°E / -26.2347972; 27.9823528 (Soccer City) 29°49′46″S 31°01′49″E / 29.82944°S 31.03028°E / -29.82944; 31.03028 (Moses Mabhida Stadium) 33°56′16″S 25°35′56″E / 33.93778°S 25.59889°E / -33.93778; 25.59889 (Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium)
Capacity: 94,700 Capacity: 54,0004 Capacity: 48,000
     
Nelspruit Rustenburg
25°27′42″S 30°55′47″E / 25.46172°S 30.929689°E / -25.46172; 30.929689 (Mbombela Stadium) 25°34′43″S 27°09′39″E / 25.5786°S 27.1607°E / -25.5786; 27.1607 (Royal Bafokeng Stadium)
Mbombela Stadium Royal Bafokeng Stadium
Capacity: 41,000 Capacity: 42,000
   

Training venuesEdit

Host city Venues
Durban Durban Peoples Park, King Zwelithini Stadium, Princess Magogo Stadium
Johannesburg Dobsonville Stadium, Millpark Stadium, Orlando Stadium, Rand Stadium[13]
Nelspruit
Port Elizabeth Gelvandale Stadium, NMMU Stadium, Westbourne Oval, Zwide Stadium[14]
Rustenburg

Match ballEdit

The official match ball for the 2013 Africa Cup of Nations was manufactured by Adidas and named the Katlego, which means "success" in Sotho language. The name was chosen by African football fans via an online voting competition where it beat alternate names, Khanya (light) and Motswako (mixture).[15]

MascotEdit

The official mascot of the tournament was Takuma, a hippo wearing sports kit in South Africa's official yellow and green. The mascot was designed by Tumelo Nkoana, a 13-year-old South African student from Hammanskraal in Gauteng.[16]

DrawEdit

The draw for the final tournament took place on 24 October 2012 in Durban.[17][18] Positions A1 and C1 were already assigned to the hosts (South Africa) and holders (Zambia) respectively.[19] The other 14 qualified teams were ranked based on their performances during the last three Africa Cup of Nations, i.e. the 2008, 2010 and 2012 editions.

Classification Points awarded
Winner 7
Runner-up 5
Losing semi-finalists 3
Losing quarter-finalists 2
Eliminated in 1st round 1

Moreover, a weighted coefficient on points was given to each of the last three editions of the Africa Cup of Nations as follows:

The teams were then divided into four pots based on the ranking. Each group contained one team from each pot.[20]

Pot 1 Pot 2 Pot 3 Pot 4

  South Africa (host; assigned to A1)
  Zambia (title holder; assigned to C1)
  Ghana (22 pts)
  Ivory Coast (22 pts)

  Mali (12 pts)
  Tunisia (10 pts)
  Angola (9 pts)
  Nigeria (8 pts)

  Algeria (6 pts)
  Burkina Faso (5 pts)
  Morocco (4 pts)
  Niger (3 pts)

  Togo (2 pts)
  Cape Verde (0 pts)
  DR Congo (0 pts)
  Ethiopia (0 pts)

Match officialsEdit

The following referees were chosen for the 2013 Africa Cup of Nations.[21]

Referees
Assistant referees

SquadsEdit

Each team can register a squad of 23 players.[19]

Group stageEdit

The schedule of the final tournament was released on 8 September 2012.[22]

Tie-breaking criteria

If two or more teams end the group stage with the same number of points, their ranking is determined by the following criteria:[19]

  1. points earned in the matches between the teams concerned;
  2. goal difference in the matches between the teams concerned;
  3. number of goals scored in the matches between the teams concerned;
  4. goal difference in all group matches;
  5. number of goals scored in all group matches;
  6. fair play points system taking into account the number of yellow and red cards;
  7. drawing of lots by the organising committee.
Key to colours in group tables
Top two placed teams advanced to the quarterfinals

All times South African Standard Time (UTC+2)

Group AEdit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
  South Africa (A) 3 1 2 0 4 2 +2 5
  Cape Verde (A) 3 1 2 0 3 2 +1 5
  Morocco 3 0 3 0 3 3 0 3
  Angola 3 0 1 2 1 4 −3 1
Source:[citation needed]
(A) Advanced to the quarterfinals.
19 January 2013
South Africa   0–0   Cape Verde FNB Stadium, Johannesburg
Angola   0–0   Morocco FNB Stadium, Johannesburg
23 January 2013
South Africa   2–0   Angola Moses Mabhida Stadium, Durban
Morocco   1–1   Cape Verde Moses Mabhida Stadium, Durban
27 January 2013
Morocco   2–2   South Africa Moses Mabhida Stadium, Durban
Cape Verde   2–1   Angola Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabeth

Group BEdit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
  Ghana (A) 3 2 1 0 6 2 +4 7
  Mali (A) 3 1 1 1 2 2 0 4
  DR Congo 3 0 3 0 3 3 0 3
  Niger 3 0 1 2 0 4 −4 1
Source:[citation needed]
(A) Advanced to the quarterfinals.
20 January 2013
Ghana   2–2   DR Congo Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabeth
Mali   1–0   Niger Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabeth
24 January 2013
Ghana   1–0   Mali Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabeth
Niger   0–0   DR Congo Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabeth
28 January 2013
Niger   0–3   Ghana Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabeth
DR Congo   1–1   Mali Moses Mabhida Stadium, Durban

Group CEdit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
  Burkina Faso (A) 3 1 2 0 5 1 +4 5
  Nigeria (A) 3 1 2 0 4 2 +2 5
  Zambia 3 0 3 0 2 2 0 3
  Ethiopia 3 0 1 2 1 7 −6 1
Source:[citation needed]
(A) Advanced to the quarterfinals.
21 January 2013
Zambia   1–1   Ethiopia Mbombela Stadium, Nelspruit
Nigeria   1–1   Burkina Faso Mbombela Stadium, Nelspruit
25 January 2013
Zambia   1–1   Nigeria Mbombela Stadium, Nelspruit
Burkina Faso   4–0   Ethiopia Mbombela Stadium, Nelspruit
29 January 2013
Burkina Faso   0–0   Zambia Mbombela Stadium, Nelspruit
Ethiopia   0–2   Nigeria Royal Bafokeng Stadium, Rustenburg

Group DEdit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
  Ivory Coast (A) 3 2 1 0 7 3 +4 7
  Togo (A) 3 1 1 1 4 3 +1 4
  Tunisia 3 1 1 1 2 4 −2 4
  Algeria 3 0 1 2 2 5 −3 1
Source:[citation needed]
(A) Advanced to the quarterfinals.
22 January 2013
Ivory Coast   2–1   Togo Royal Bafokeng Stadium, Rustenburg
Tunisia   1–0   Algeria Royal Bafokeng Stadium, Rustenburg
26 January 2013
Ivory Coast   3–0   Tunisia Royal Bafokeng Stadium, Rustenburg
Algeria   0–2   Togo Royal Bafokeng Stadium, Rustenburg
30 January 2013
Algeria   2–2   Ivory Coast Royal Bafokeng Stadium, Rustenburg
Togo   1–1   Tunisia Mbombela Stadium, Nelspruit

Knockout phaseEdit

In the knockout stages, if a match is level at the end of normal playing time, extra time shall be played (two periods of 15 minutes each) and followed, if necessary, by kicks from the penalty mark to determine the winner, except for the play-off for third place where no extra time shall be played.[19]

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
2 February – Durban
 
 
  South Africa1 (1)
 
6 February – Durban
 
  Mali (p)1 (3)
 
  Mali1
 
3 February – Rustenburg
 
  Nigeria4
 
  Ivory Coast1
 
10 February – Johannesburg
 
  Nigeria2
 
  Nigeria1
 
3 February – Nelspruit
 
  Burkina Faso0
 
  Burkina Faso (aet)1
 
6 February – Nelspruit
 
  Togo0
 
  Burkina Faso (p)1 (3)
 
2 February – Port Elizabeth
 
  Ghana1 (2) Third place
 
  Ghana2
 
9 February – Port Elizabeth
 
  Cape Verde0
 
  Mali3
 
 
  Ghana1
 

Quarter-finalsEdit

Ghana  2–0  Cape Verde
Wakaso   54' (pen.)90+5' Report

South Africa  1–1 (a.e.t.)  Mali
Rantie   31' Report Keita   58'
Penalties
Tshabalala  
Furman  
Mahlangu  
Majoro  
1–3   Diabaté
  Tamboura
  Ma. Traoré

Ivory Coast  1–2  Nigeria
Tioté   50' Report Emenike   43'
Mba   78'

Burkina Faso  1–0 (a.e.t.)  Togo
Pitroipa   105' Report

Semi-finalsEdit

Mali  1–4  Nigeria
C. Diarra   75' Report Echiéjilé   25'
Ideye   30'
Emenike   44'
Musa   60'

Burkina Faso  1–1 (a.e.t.)  Ghana
Bancé   60' Report Wakaso   13' (pen.)
Penalties
B. Koné  
H. Traoré  
Paul Koulibaly  
Bancé  
3–2   Vorsah
  Atsu
  Afful
  Clottey
  Agyemang-Badu
Attendance: 35,000[23]
Referee: Slim Jedidi (Tunisia)

Third place play-offEdit

Mali  3–1  Ghana
Mah. Samassa   21'
Keita   48'
S. Diarra   90+4'
Report Asamoah   82'

FinalEdit

Nigeria  1–0  Burkina Faso
Mba   40' Report

WinnersEdit

 2013 Africa Cup of Nations Champions 
 
Nigeria
Third title

Player awardsEdit

The following awards were given for the tournament:[24]

Orange Player of the Tournament
Pepsi Tournament Top Scorer
Player name Games played Goals scored Assists Minutes played Source
  Emmanuel Emenike 5 4 3 403 [25]
  Wakaso Mubarak 5 4 (3 penalties) 0 396[26] [27]
Samsung Fair Player of the Tournament
Nissan Goal of the tournament
Team of the Tournament
Goalkeeper Defenders Midfielders Forwards
  Vincent Enyeama   Bakary Koné
  Nando
  Siaka Tiéné
  Efe Ambrose
  Jonathan Pitroipa
  Seydou Keita
  John Obi Mikel
  Victor Moses
  Asamoah Gyan
  Emmanuel Emenike

GoalscorersEdit

Team statisticsEdit

Pos. Team Pld W D L Pts GF GA GD
1   Nigeria 6 4 2 0 14 11 4 +7
2   Burkina Faso 6 2 3 1 9 7 3 +4
3   Mali 6 2 2 2 8 7 8 -1
4   Ghana 6 3 2 1 11 10 6 +4
Eliminated in the quarter-finals
5   Ivory Coast 4 2 1 1 7 8 5 +3
6   South Africa 4 1 3 0 6 5 3 +2
7   Cape Verde 4 1 2 1 5 3 4 -1
8   Togo 4 1 1 2 4 4 4 0
Eliminated in the group stage
9   Tunisia 3 1 1 1 4 2 4 -2
10   DR Congo 3 0 3 0 3 3 3 0
10   Morocco 3 0 3 0 3 3 3 0
12   Zambia 3 0 3 0 3 2 2 0
13   Algeria 3 0 1 2 1 2 5 -3
14   Angola 3 0 1 2 1 1 4 -3
15   Niger 3 0 1 2 1 0 4 -4
16   Ethiopia 3 0 1 2 1 1 7 -6
Total 32(1) 17 15(2) 17 81 69 69 0

Updated to games played on 10 February 2013. Team(s) rendered in italics represent(s) the host nation(s). The competition's winning team is rendered in bold.
(1) – Total games lost not counted in total games played (total games lost = total games won)
(2) – Total number of games drawn (tied) for all teams = Total number of games drawn (tied) ÷ 2 (both teams involved)
(3) – As per statistical convention in football, matches decided in extra time are counted as wins and losses, while matches decided by penalty shoot-outs are counted as draws.

MarketingEdit

SponsorshipEdit

MediaEdit

South African public broadcaster SABC was the host broadcaster of the tournament. It paid R65 million (US$7.5 million) for the rights, which entitle it to transmit all of the games across its radio and television platforms.

BroadcastingEdit

Territory Broadcaster Ref
  Albania SuperSport [citation needed]
  Australia Eurosport [28]
  Botswana Botswana TV [29]
  Brazil SporTV [30]
  Cape Verde RTC [citation needed]
  Europe1 Eurosport [31]
  France Canal+ [32]
  Ghana GTV [33]
  Hong Kong Now TV [34]
  Ireland ITV4, British Eurosport [35]
  Israel Eurosport [31]
  Malaysia Media Prima [36]
  Middle East and North Africa Al Jazeera [37]
  Romania Romanian Eurosport [citation needed]
  Russia Russian Eurosport [citation needed]
  South Africa SABC [38]
 Sub-Saharan Africa SuperSport [39]
  Thailand CH7 [citation needed]
  United Kingdom ITV4, British Eurosport [35]
  South America2 DirecTV [40]
  United States ESPN [41][42]
^1  – Excluding France.
^2  – Excluding Bolivia, Brazil, Guyana, Paraguay and Suriname.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "CAF Executive Committee decisions: CAN in odd years from 2013". Confederation of African Football. Archived from the original on 20 June 2010. Retrieved 27 June 2010.
  2. ^ a b "Africa Cup of Nations Cup to move to odd-numbered years". BBC Sport. BBC. 16 May 2010. Retrieved 13 February 2012.
  3. ^ "Qualifiers – FIFA Confederations Cup Brazil 2013". Fifa.com. Archived from the original on 29 December 2011. Retrieved 2012-02-18.
  4. ^ "South Africa replace Libya as 2013 Nations Cup hosts". BBC. 28 September 2011. Retrieved 2 February 2012.
  5. ^ "SA keen to host showpiece of African soccer".
  6. ^ "Fewer venues for 2013 Afcon". Kickoff.com. 15 March 2012. Retrieved 15 March 2012.
  7. ^ "Afcon host cities to be revealed next week". Kickoff.com. 20 March 2012. Retrieved 24 March 2012.
  8. ^ "Cities delay submitting bids for 2013 Cup of Nations". BBC Sport. 25 March 2012. Retrieved 26 March 2012.
  9. ^ "Afcon host cities announcement postponed". Kickoff. 19 April 2012. Retrieved 21 April 2012.
  10. ^ "Clarification On Afcon Venues". Soccer Laduma. 4 May 2012. Archived from the original on 25 June 2013. Retrieved 4 May 2012.
  11. ^ "OFFICIAL: Host cities announced". Kickoff. 4 May 2012. Retrieved 4 May 2012.
  12. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 8 March 2010. Retrieved 2010-03-06.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  13. ^ "Gauteng ready to kick off the Afcon 2013 spectacle". The Sowetan. 9 January 2013. Retrieved 19 January 2013.
  14. ^ "Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium and training venues ready for AFCON". Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality. 8 January 2013. Retrieved 19 January 2013.
  15. ^ "Adidas unveils the official match ball of the Orange Africa Cup of Nations 2013, South Africa". Adidas South Africa. 25 October 2012. Archived from the original on 13 April 2013. Retrieved 19 January 2013.
  16. ^ "Mascot Competition Winner Awarded". SAnews.gov.za. eThekwini Municipality. Retrieved 12 February 2015.
  17. ^ "CAN 2013 Final draw date change". CAFonline.com. 12 September 2012. Archived from the original on 16 September 2012.
  18. ^ "Orange CAN 2013 draw result". CAFonline.com. 24 October 2012. Archived from the original on 26 October 2012.
  19. ^ a b c d "Regulations of the Orange Africa Cup of Nations SOUTH AFRICA 2013" (PDF). CAFonline.com. Archived from the original (PDF) on 23 January 2013.
  20. ^ "Draw procedure: Orange Africa Cup of Nations" (PDF). CAFonline.com. 18 October 2012. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 October 2012.
  21. ^ "Referees". CAF Online. Confederation of African Football. Archived from the original on 18 January 2013. Retrieved 4 January 2013.
  22. ^ "Orange AFCON 2013 official calendar" (PDF). CAFonline.com. 8 September 2012. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 December 2012.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h "2013 African Nations Cup Fixtures and Results". ESPN Soccernet. Retrieved 22 January 2013.
  24. ^ "Orange CAF Africa Cup of Nations Awards". Orange Africa Cup of Nations South Africa 2013.
  25. ^ "Emmanuel Emenike profile". MTN Football. Archived from the original on 26 January 2013. Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  26. ^ "Ghana - M. Wakaso - Profile with news, career statistics and history - Soccerway". Soccerway.com. Retrieved 19 February 2019.
  27. ^ "Mubarak Wakaso profile". MTN Football. Archived from the original on 29 January 2013. Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  28. ^ "Fox Sports Scores New Barclays Broadcast Agreement". foxtel.com.au. Archived from the original on 17 December 2012. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  29. ^ "Botswana TV finally gets Africa Cup of Nations rights". sportspromedia.com. Retrieved 4 January 2013.
  30. ^ "SporTV – Vídeos de futebol e outros esportes no canal campeão". Retrieved 17 January 2013.[not in citation given]
  31. ^ a b "Puchar Narodów Afryki już w styczniu w Eurosporcie". tele-sport.pl. Archived from the original on 16 April 2013. Retrieved 4 January 2013.
  32. ^ "Canal+ secures major CAF contract". sportspromedia.com. Retrieved 4 January 2013.
  33. ^ "Ghana's Government buy African Cup of Nations broadcasting rights". insideworldfootball.biz. Archived from the original on 18 October 2012. Retrieved 4 January 2013.
  34. ^ "2013非洲國家盃". Now TV. Retrieved 2 September 2016.[dead link]
  35. ^ a b "Live African Cup of Nations On TV". live-footballontv.com. Retrieved 4 January 2013.
  36. ^ "CAN 2013 on Tv3 Malaysia, Tv9 Malaysia & TONTON". tvcorner.com. Archived from the original on 20 September 2013. Retrieved 2 September 2016.CS1 maint: Unfit url (link)
  37. ^ "CAN 2013 on Al Jazeera Sports". tvcorner.com. Archived from the original on 6 June 2015. Retrieved 2 September 2016.
  38. ^ "SABC steps in as Africa Cup of Nations host broadcaster". sportspromedia.com. Retrieved 4 January 2013.
  39. ^ "SS offers wall-to-wall Afcon coverage". SuperSport. 10 January 2013. Retrieved 17 January 2013.
  40. ^ Africa Cup of Nations
  41. ^ Per broadcasting listings at ESPN.com
  42. ^ Africa Cup of Nations Live-Soccer-Tv. Retrieved 10 January 2013

External linksEdit