Saudi Arabia national football team

The Saudi Arabia national football team (SAFF) (Arabic: المنتخب السُّعُودِيّ لِكُرَّةُ الْقَدَم) represents Saudi Arabia in men's international football. They are known as Al-Suqour Al-Abiyyah (Arabian Falcons) and sometimes Al-Suqour Al-Khodhur (The Green Falcons), a reference to their traditional colours of green and white, and represent both FIFA and the Asian Football Confederation (AFC).

Saudi Arabia
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)الصقور العربية (as-Suqūr Al-‘Arabiyyah, "Arabian Falcons")
الصقور الخضر (as-Suqūr al-Khoḍur, "The Green Falcons")
الأخضر (al-'Akhḍar, "The Green Men")
AssociationSaudi Arabian Football Federation
ConfederationAFC (Asia)
Sub-confederationWAFF (West Asia)
Head coachRoberto Mancini
CaptainSalman Al-Faraj
Most capsMohamed Al-Deayea (173)[1]
Top scorerMajed Abdullah (72)[2]
Home stadiumVarious
FIFA codeKSA
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 56 Steady (18 July 2024)[3]
Highest21 (July 2004)
Lowest126 (December 2012)
First international
 Lebanon 1–1 Saudi Arabia 
(Beirut, Lebanon; 18 January 1957)
Biggest win
 East Timor 0–10 Saudi Arabia 
(Dili, Timor-Leste; 17 November 2015)
Biggest defeat
 Egypt 13–0 Saudi Arabia 
(Casablanca, Morocco; 3 September 1961)
World Cup
Appearances6 (first in 1994)
Best resultRound of 16 (1994)
Asian Cup
Appearances12 (first in 1984)
Best resultChampions (1984, 1988, 1996)
Arab Cup
Appearances7 (first in 1985)
Best resultChampions (1998, 2002)
Arabian Gulf Cup
Appearances24 (first in 1970)
Best resultChampions (1994, 2002, 2003–04)
WAFF Championship
Appearances3 (first in 2012)
Best resultGroup stage (2012, 2014, 2019)
FIFA Confederations Cup
Appearances4 (first in 1992)
Best resultRunners-up (1992)
Websitesaff.sa

Considered one of Asia's most successful national teams, Saudi Arabia have won the AFC Asian Cup three times (1984, 1988 and 1996), reached a joint record six Asian Cup finals and have qualified for the FIFA World Cup on seven occasions since debuting at the 1994 tournament. Saudi Arabia are the first Asian team to reach the final of a senior FIFA competition at the 1992 King Fahd Cup, which would eventually become the FIFA Confederations Cup. Only Australia and Japan managed to repeat this feat in 1997 and 2001 respectively, though Australia achieved it when they were a member of the OFC.

At the 1994 World Cup, under the leadership of Jorge Solari, Saudi Arabia beat both Belgium and Morocco in the group stage before falling to Sweden in the round of 16. Thus, they became the second Arab team in history to reach the knockout stage of a World Cup after Morocco in 1986 and 2022, and one of the few Asian national football teams (the others being Australia, Japan, South Korea and North Korea) to accomplish such a feat to date. During the 2022 World Cup, Saudi Arabia caused a large upset when they beat eventual champions Argentina 2–1, the first time Argentina lost to an Asian representative in a FIFA World Cup. However, Saudi Arabia then lost the following matches against Poland and Mexico to finish last.

In 2027, Saudi Arabia will host the AFC Asian Cup, the first time that the nation has ever hosted the Asian Cup.[5] They will also host the 2034 FIFA World Cup.[6]

History

edit

Early history (1951–1955)

edit

The idea of a Saudi national team first came about in 1951, when a Saudi XI team consisting of players from Al-Wehda and Al-Ahli took part in a friendly game against the Egyptian Ministry of Health on 27 June at the Al-Saban Stadium in Jeddah. The following day, the Egyptians took on a Saudi team made up of players from Al-Ittihad and Al-Hilal in Al-Bahri in the same city. On 2 August, His Royal Highness Prince Abdullah Al-Faisal organized a third friendly with the Egyptian team against Saudi Arabia with players from Al-Wehda, and Al-Ahli. By then, the idea of a national select team to represent the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia was already in full flow, and in 1953 the first-ever Saudi team traveled to play friendly matches abroad. The same year, a Saudi team traveled to Damascus to play friendly matches as part of then-Crown Prince Saud bin Abdulaziz's visit to the country in April.[7]

In 1957, the Saudi national team took part in their first international tournament at the 2nd Pan-Arab Games in Beirut, where King Saud was invited to attend the opening ceremony and the inauguration of the Camille Chamoun Sports City Stadium with Lebanese President Camille Chamoun on 18 October. Abdulmajeed Kayal scored for the Saudis while Levon Altonian netted for the home side.[8]

Debuting successes and subsequent declines (1956–2016)

edit

Though their football federation was established in 1956, the Saudi Arabia national team did not participate in a tournament until they qualified for the AFC Asian Cup in 1984, becoming Asian champions for the first time.[9] Since then, they reached the next four consecutive Asian Cup finals, winning two of them (1988 and 1996).[10][11] They have qualified for every AFC Asian Cup since, reaching the final in the 2007 edition.[12]

 
Saudi national team, 1984
 
Saudi Arabia facing China in the 1984 AFC Asian Cup

Saudi Arabia qualified for their first FIFA World Cup in 1994 under the leadership of Argentine manager Jorge Solari and talents like Saeed Al-Owairan and Sami Al-Jaber, reinforced by national veteran Majed Abdullah as team captain. Wins against Belgium and Morocco in the group stage led to a match-up against Sweden in the round of 16, a 3–1 loss.[13] Saudi Arabia qualified for the next three World Cups, but failed to win a match in any of them; in 1998, the team suffered an agonizing group stage elimination for the first time after only a draw was achieved, which occurred against South Africa. The team placed last in 2002 without scoring a goal, while conceding 12, including eight against Germany, the most humiliating World Cup performance ever by an Asian team since 1954, and the team did no better in 2006 after winning only a single point against Arab rival Tunisia, and also squandered a 2–1 lead in the last minutes before losing to Ukraine.[14]

After the 2007 AFC Asian Cup, Saudi Arabia suffered even further setbacks. The Saudis failed to qualify for the 2010 FIFA World Cup in agonizing playoffs that saw them again squandered their 2–1 lead to a 2–2 draw to neighbor Bahrain.[15] In the 2011 AFC Asian Cup, the Saudis went on to have their worst-ever Asian Cup performance in history, losing all three games in a shocking style to Syria, Jordan and Japan.[16] Later on, Saudi Arabia failed to qualify for the 2014 FIFA World Cup, failing in the third round to Australia and Oman. This embarrassing record kept following the Saudis into the 2015 AFC Asian Cup, as the Saudis suffered another group stage exit, this time losing to China and Uzbekistan. They only won against North Korea.

Revival (2017–present)

edit

Saudi Arabia secured qualification for the 2018 World Cup, their first in 12 years,[17] ahead of Australia. In the opening match, Saudi Arabia were crushed by hosts Russia 5–0,[18] making this the second largest victory of any host.[19] Saudi Arabia then lost 1–0 to a Luis Suárez goal that put Uruguay as the eventual group winners.[20] Although they were already eliminated,[21] Saudi Arabia managed to salvage some pride by winning their final group stage match against Red Sea neighbours Egypt.[22]

After the 2018 World Cup, Saudi Arabia participated in the 2019 Asian Cup, held in the United Arab Emirates; the team finished second in the group stage, after falling to Qatar in the final game,[23] leading to a showdown against Japan in the round of 16. The Saudis dominated the whole game, but ultimately lost 1–0 due to poor finishing.[24]

On 15 October 2019, Saudi Arabia played its first-ever game with Palestine in the West Bank; the game marked a change in policy for Saudi Arabia, which has previously played matches against the Palestinian team in third-party countries. The visit was condemned by some Palestinian activists, who considered the game as a start of normalizing the relations between Saudi Arabia and Israel, but it was viewed by the Palestinian National Authority as a support for their sovereignty over the West Bank.[25] The game ended in a scoreless draw.[26]

 
Saudi Arabia against Egypt in the 2018 World Cup

Saudi Arabia qualified for the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, the first to be held in the Middle East, by topping their qualifying group and were drawn against Argentina, Poland and Mexico.[27] In their opening game, they defeated Argentina 2–1 within the first five minutes of second half with goals from Saleh Al-Shehri and Salem Al-Dawsari, ending an Argentine unbeaten streak of 36 games dating back to 2019. The Saudi King declared a holiday after the win and Saudi fans celebrated with mocking words against Lionel Messi and the Argentine team.[28][29] They then lost their next match against Poland, 2–0. Piotr Zieliński broke Saudi hearts with a goal in the 39th minute and Robert Lewandowski scored his first World Cup goal; between these two goals also included a devastatingly missed opportunity on the penalty by the hero against Argentina, Salem Al-Dawsari as the Saudis could not capitalise from their domination.[30] This required a win against Mexico to advance to the Round of 16 regardless of the Argentina–Poland result. Fielding three strikers in front, Saudi Arabia however were unable to exert any domination over the energetic Mexican side, conceding two devastating early second half goals by Henry Martín and Luis Chávez, the second being a thunderous midfield free kick; late consolation by Salem Al-Dawsari only salvaged some little pride left as the Saudis fell 2–1 and were eliminated at the bottom of the table to end their most impressive yet bitter World Cup performance since 1994.[31]

Saudi Arabia, under new manager Roberto Mancini, entered the 2023 AFC Asian Cup with a sense of bitter pride from their 2022 FIFA World Cup performance, finding itself in Group F with Oman, Kyrgyzstan and Thailand. The Saudis started their campaign with a 2–1 comeback win over their rivalling neighbour Oman, where Abdulrahman Ghareeb scored from a solo before a late Ali Al-Bulaihi's header sealed the dramatic win.[32] The Saudis completed their group with a 2–0 win over Kyrgyzstan, where the Saudis were dominant from the beginning to the end and had two men advantage but only scored by goalkeeping mistakes.[33] The Saudis rested most of their best players as they held Thailand in a goalless draw to advance on top of the table, putting the Saudis against fellow Asian titan South Korea in the last sixteen.[34] Against South Korea, Abdullah Radif opened the scoring at the first minute of the second half, but failed to hold the score because of a late Cho Gue-sung's header; subsequently, the game reached the penalty shootout, where the Saudis could not hold the nerve and lost 4–2 on penalties and were eliminated.[35]

Kits and crests

edit

Traditionally, Saudi Arabia's home kit is white with a green trim, and the away kit is green with a white trim (the Saudi flag colors).[36] From 2023, the team had a color kit reversal where green is the home kit, and white is their away kit.

Kit suppliers

edit
Kit supplier Period
  Admiral 1976–1979
  Puma 1980–1984
  Faisok 1985–1989
  Adidas 1990–1993
  Shammel 1994–2000
  Adidas 2001–2003
  Le Coq Sportif 2004–2005
  Puma 2006–2010
  Nike[37] 2011–2022
  Adidas[38] 2023–present

Rivalries

edit

Saudi Arabia's main rivals are mostly from the Persian Gulf, notably Iran, Iraq, Qatar, Kuwait, and the United Arab Emirates.

Due to historical reasons, matches against Iran have been frequently followed and seen by Saudis as the most important rival. This stems from the strong hatred between Saudi Arabia and Iran, in particular in recent years due to historical enmities. Saudi Arabia has won 4 matches, drew 6 times, and lost 5 against Iran. It is one of the ten most heated rivalries with political influence.[39][40]

Saudi Arabia's rivalry against Iraq began in the 1970s. Due to the Gulf War, in which Iraq invaded Saudi Arabia's ally Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Iraq eventually became bitter rivals fighting to salvage Arab pride.[41] The two countries since then have been up-and-down in relations, often ranging from lack of cooperation to political confrontation. Iraq almost pulled out of the 21st Arabian Gulf Cup after the country was disallowed to host the competition in a move believed to be motivated by Saudi Arabia.[42][43]

Venues

edit

Historically, Saudi Arabia played most of their home matches in King Fahd Sports City, located in the capital Riyadh. The stadium was also where some of Saudi Arabia's most important fixtures were played when the country hosted the first three King Fahd Cups (the predecessor of the Confederations Cup). The stadium was also home to some of Saudi Arabia's matches in the World Cup qualifiers.

Saudi Arabia started to diversify the use of venues from outside Riyadh in the 2000s, with the 2002 World Cup qualifying first round being played in Prince Mohamed bin Fahd Stadium in Dammam and the second round being played entirely in Prince Faisal bin Fahd Stadium. In the 2006 World Cup qualifying second round against Sri Lanka and the first fixture against Uzbekistan in the third round, Saudi Arabia also played in Prince Mohamed bin Fahd Stadium.[citation needed]

Results and fixtures

edit

The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

  Win   Draw   Loss   Fixture

2023

edit
8 September 2023 Friendly Saudi Arabia   1–3   Costa Rica Newcastle, England
20:00 UTC+1
  • Al-Bulayhi   68'
Report
Stadium: St James' Park
Attendance: 5,000
Referee: John Brooks (England)
12 September 2023 Friendly Saudi Arabia   0–1   South Korea Newcastle, England
17:30 UTC+1 Report
Stadium: St James' Park
Attendance: 3,000
Referee: Andrew Madley (England)
13 October 2023 Friendly Saudi Arabia   2–2   Nigeria Portimão, Portugal
17:00 UTC+1
Report
Stadium: Estádio Municipal de Portimão
Referee: Luís Godinho (Portugal)
17 October 2023 Friendly Saudi Arabia   1–3   Mali Portimão, Portugal
16:00 UTC+1 Report
Stadium: Estádio Municipal de Portimão
Referee: António Nobre (Portugal)
16 November 2026 WC qualification Saudi Arabia   4–0   Pakistan Hofuf, Saudi Arabia
19:30 UTC+3
Report Stadium: Al-Fateh Club Stadium
Attendance: 11,150
Referee: Hanna Hattab (Syria)
21 November 2026 WC qualification Jordan   0–2   Saudi Arabia Amman, Jordan
19:00 UTC+3 Report
Stadium: Amman International Stadium
Attendance: 13,845
Referee: Ahmed Al-Kaf (Oman)

2024

edit
4 January Friendly Saudi Arabia   1–0   Lebanon Al Wakrah, Qatar
16:30 UTC+3
Report Stadium: Al Janoub Stadium
Attendance: 0
9 January Friendly Palestine   0–0   Saudi Arabia Doha, Qatar
18:30 UTC+3 Report
Report (SAFF)
Stadium: Al Janoub Stadium
Attendance: 0
10 January Friendly Saudi Arabia   2–0   Hong Kong Al Wakrah, Qatar
18:30 UTC+3
Stadium: Al Janoub Stadium
16 January 2023 AFC Asian Cup GS Saudi Arabia   2–1   Oman Al Rayyan, Qatar
20:30 UTC+3
Report
Stadium: Khalifa International Stadium
Attendance: 41,987
Referee: Shaun Evans (Australia)
21 January 2023 AFC Asian Cup GS Kyrgyzstan   0–2   Saudi Arabia Al Rayyan, Qatar
20:30 UTC+3 Report
Stadium: Ahmad bin Ali Stadium
Attendance: 39,557
Referee: Jumpei Iida (Japan)
25 January 2023 AFC Asian Cup GS Saudi Arabia   0–0   Thailand Al Rayyan, Qatar
18:00 UTC+3 Report Stadium: Education City Stadium
Attendance: 38,773
Referee: Kim Hee-gon (South Korea)
21 March 2026 World Cup qualification Saudi Arabia   1–0   Tajikistan Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
22:00 UTC+3
Report (FIFA)
Report (AFC)
Stadium: Al-Awwal Park
Attendance: 18,755
Referee: Muhammad Taqi (Singapore)
26 March 2026 World Cup qualification Tajikistan   1–1   Saudi Arabia Dushanbe, Tajikistan
20:00 UTC+5
Report (FIFA)
Report (AFC)
Stadium: Pamir Stadium
Attendance: 13,300
Referee: Kim Jong-hyeok (South Korea)
6 June 2026 World Cup qualification Pakistan   0–3   Saudi Arabia Islamabad, Pakistan
20:30 UTC+5 Report (FIFA)
Report (AFC)
Stadium: Jinnah Sports Stadium
Attendance: 20,124
Referee: Ammar Mahfoodh (Bahrain)
11 June 2026 World Cup qualification Saudi Arabia   1–2   Jordan Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
21:00 UTC+3
Report (FIFA)
Report (AFC)
Stadium: King Saud University Stadium
Attendance: 17,871
Referee: Adel Al-Naqbi (United Arab Emirates)

Coaching staff

edit
As of 28 August 2023
Position Name Ref.
Head coach   Roberto Mancini [44]
Assistant coaches   Attilio Lombardo [45]
  Fausto Salsano [45]
  Antonio Gagliardi [45]
  Yaya Touré [45]
  Simone Contran [45]
Goalkeeping coach   Massimo Battara [45]
  Marco Roccati [45]
Trainer   Andrea Scanavino [45]
  Claudio Donatelli [45]
Scout   Giorgio Venturin [45]
Technical director     Nasser Larguet [45]

Coaching history

edit
No. Coach Nat First match Last match Pld W D L Win %
1 Abdulrahman Fawzi   18 October 1957 6 September 1961 6 1 1 4 16.67%
2 Ali Chaouach   1 December 1967 17 January 1969 2 1 0 1 50.00%
3 George Skinner   28 March 1970 2 April 1970 3 0 2 1 0.00%
4 Taha Ismail   16 March 1972 28 March 1972 3 2 1 0 66.67%
5 Abdo Saleh El Wahsh   6 March 1974 29 March 1974 6 4 1 1 66.67%
6 Ferenc Puskás   21 November 1975 11 April 1976 16 5 1 10 31.25%
7 Bill McGarry   5 September 1976 22 April 1977 12 3 2 7 25.00%
8 Ronnie Allen   15 November 1978 14 December 1978 4 0 3 1 0.00%
9 David Woodfield   24 March 1979 8 April 1979 6 3 2 1 50.00%
10 Rubens Minelli   30 January 1980 19 December 1981 22 9 3 10 40.91%
11 Mário Zagallo   21 March 1982 17 March 1984 17 7 5 5 41.18%
12 Khalil Ibrahim Al-Zayani   20 March 1984 5 April 1986 39 19 9 11 48.72%
13 Carlos Castilho   7 September 1986 5 October 1986 7 4 2 1 57.14%
14 Omar Borrás   17 February 1988 18 March 1988 7 2 4 1 28.57%
15 Carlos Alberto Parreira (1)   21 April 1988 28 October 1989 26 10 9 7 38.46%
16 Paulo Massa   24 September 1990 1 October 1990 3 2 1 0 66.67%
17 Nelsinho Rosa   11 September 1992 10 December 1992 14 7 3 4 50.00%
18 Candinho   9 April 1993 24 October 1993 19 12 5 2 63.16%
19 Mohammed Al-Kharashy (1)   28 October 1993 28 October 1993 1 1 0 0 100.00%
20 Leo Beenhakker   23 January 1994 9 February 1994 4 1 2 1 25.00%
21 Jorge Solari   26 March 1994 3 July 1994 12 4 2 6 33.33%
22 Ivo Wortmann   1 October 1994 13 October 1994 5 3 0 2 60.00%
23 Mohammed Al-Kharashy (2)   19 October 1994 8 January 1995 11 6 1 4 54.54%
24 Zé Mário   8 October 1995 27 October 1996 20 9 5 6 45.00%
25 Nelo Vingada   6 November 1996 11 October 1997 25 16 6 3 64.00%
26 Otto Pfister (1)   17 October 1997 16 December 1997 8 3 2 3 37.50%
27 Carlos Alberto Parreira (2)   22 February 1998 18 June 1998 10 2 4 4 20.00%
28 Mohammed Al-Kharashy (3)   24 June 1998 24 June 1998 1 0 1 0 0.00%
29 Otto Pfister (2)   11 September 1998 11 November 1998 11 9 2 0 81.81%
30 Milan Máčala   18 June 1999 14 October 2000 26 11 6 9 42.31%
31 Nasser Al-Johar (1)   17 October 2000 19 February 2001 13 11 1 1 84.61%
32 Slobodan Santrač   10 July 2001 24 August 2001 7 3 2 2 42.86%
33 Nasser Al-Johar (2)   31 August 2001 11 June 2002 23 13 2 8 56.52%
34 Gerard van der Lem   17 December 2002 26 July 2004 26 17 6 3 65.38%
35 Martin Koopman   30 December 2002 30 December 2002 1 1 0 0 100.00%
36 Nasser Al-Johar (3)   1 September 2004 17 November 2004 5 3 2 0 60.00%
37 Gabriel Calderón   11 December 2004 8 December 2005 19 8 4 7 42.11%
38 Marcos Paquetá   18 January 2006 27 January 2007 30 13 7 10 43.33%
39 Hélio dos Anjos   24 June 2007 7 June 2008 22 15 3 4 68.18%
40 Nasser Al-Johar (4)   14 June 2008 11 February 2009 18 10 5 3 55.55%
41 José Peseiro   22 March 2009 9 January 2011 31 12 12 7 38.71%
42 Nasser Al-Johar (5)   13 January 2011 17 January 2011 2 0 0 2 0.00%
43 Rogério Lourenço   13 July 2011 28 July 2011 4 2 1 1 50.00%
44 Frank Rijkaard   2 September 2011 12 January 2013 17 4 6 7 23.53%
45 Khalid Al-Koroni   9 December 2012 15 December 2012 3 1 1 1 33.33%
46 Juan Ramón López Caro   6 February 2013 26 November 2014 19 9 4 6 47.37%
47 Cosmin Olăroiu   30 December 2014 18 January 2015 4 1 0 3 25.00%
48 Faisal Al Baden   30 March 2015 11 June 2015 2 2 0 0 100.00%
49 Bert van Marwijk   3 September 2015 9 November 2017 20 13 4 3 65.00%
50 Edgardo Bauza   10 November 2017 13 November 2017 2 0 0 2 0.00%
51 Krunoslav Jurčić   22 December 2017 28 December 2017 3 1 1 1 33.33%
52 Juan Antonio Pizzi  
 
26 February 2018 21 January 2019 22 7 5 10 31.82%
53 Youssef Anbar   21 March 2019 25 March 2019 2 1 0 1 50.00%
54 Hervé Renard   5 September 2019 28 March 2023 46 18 12 16 39.13%
55 Laurent Bonadéi[a]   1 December 2021 7 December 2021 3 0 1 2 0.00%
56 Saad Al-Shehri[b]   6 January 2023 23 August 2023 3 1 0 2 33.33%
57 Roberto Mancini   28 August 2023 Present 15 7 5 3 46.67%
Notes
  1. ^ The assistant coach, Laurent Bonadéi took charge of the national team temporarily for the 2021 FIFA Arab Cup.
  2. ^ The assistant coach, Saad Al-Shehri took charge of the national team temporarily for the 25th Arabian Gulf Cup. He was once again named interim coach following Hervé Renard's resignation.

Players

edit

Current squad

edit

The following 31 players were called up for the 2026 FIFA World Cup qualification games against   Pakistan and   Jordan on 6 and 11 June 2024.[46]

Caps and goals are correct as of 11 June 2024, after the match against   Jordan, as recognized by SAFF.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Mohammed Al-Owais (1991-10-10) 10 October 1991 (age 32) 56 0   Al-Hilal
1GK Mohammed Al-Rubaie (1997-08-14) 14 August 1997 (age 26) 7 0   Al-Hilal
1GK Ahmed Al-Kassar (1991-05-08) 8 May 1991 (age 33) 4 0   Al-Qadsiah
1GK Raghed Al-Najjar (1996-09-20) 20 September 1996 (age 27) 1 0   Al-Nassr
1GK Mohammed Al-Absi (2002-09-24) 24 September 2002 (age 21) 0 0   Al-Shabab

2DF Ali Al-Bulaihi (1989-11-21) 21 November 1989 (age 34) 53 2   Al-Hilal
2DF Mohammed Al-Breik (1992-09-15) 15 September 1992 (age 31) 46 1   Al-Hilal
2DF Saud Abdulhamid (1999-07-18) 18 July 1999 (age 25) 36 1   Al-Hilal
2DF Sultan Al-Ghannam (1994-05-06) 6 May 1994 (age 30) 31 0   Al-Nassr
2DF Hassan Al-Tambakti (1999-02-09) 9 February 1999 (age 25) 29 0   Al-Hilal
2DF Ali Lajami (1996-04-24) 24 April 1996 (age 28) 11 1   Al-Nassr
2DF Hassan Kadesh (1992-09-27) 27 September 1992 (age 31) 8 0   Al-Ittihad
2DF Awn Al-Saluli (1998-09-02) 2 September 1998 (age 25) 7 0   Al-Taawoun
2DF Moteb Al-Harbi (2000-02-20) 20 February 2000 (age 24) 6 0   Al-Shabab
2DF Rayane Hamidou (2002-04-13) 13 April 2002 (age 22) 2 0   Al-Ahli

3MF Salem Al-Dawsari (1991-08-19) 19 August 1991 (age 32) 86 23   Al-Hilal
3MF Mohamed Kanno (1994-09-22) 22 September 1994 (age 29) 55 3   Al-Hilal
3MF Abdulrahman Ghareeb (1997-03-31) 31 March 1997 (age 27) 29 3   Al-Nassr
3MF Sami Al-Najei (1997-02-07) 7 February 1997 (age 27) 22 2   Al-Nassr
3MF Abdullah Al-Khaibari (1996-08-16) 16 August 1996 (age 27) 22 0   Al-Nassr
3MF Nasser Al-Dawsari (1998-12-19) 19 December 1998 (age 25) 21 0   Al-Hilal
3MF Mukhtar Ali (1997-10-30) 30 October 1997 (age 26) 13 0   Al-Fateh
3MF Ayman Yahya (2001-05-14) 14 May 2001 (age 23) 11 0   Al-Nassr
3MF Faisal Al-Ghamdi (2001-08-13) 13 August 2001 (age 22) 8 1   Al-Ittihad
3MF Musab Al-Juwayr (2003-06-20) 20 June 2003 (age 21) 5 2   Al-Shabab
3MF Ahmed Al-Ghamdi (2001-09-20) 20 September 2001 (age 22) 3 0   Al-Ittihad
3MF Abbas Al-Hassan (2004-02-22) 22 February 2004 (age 20) 3 0   Al-Fateh
3MF Marwan Al-Sahafi (2004-02-17) 17 February 2004 (age 20) 1 0   Al-Ittihad

4FW Firas Al-Buraikan (2000-05-14) 14 May 2000 (age 24) 41 9   Al-Ahli
4FW Abdullah Al-Hamdan (1999-09-13) 13 September 1999 (age 24) 29 5   Al-Hilal
4FW Abdullah Radif (2003-01-20) 20 January 2003 (age 21) 14 2   Al-Shabab

Recent call-ups

edit

The following players have also been called up to the Saudi Arabia squad within the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Nawaf Al-Aqidi (2000-05-10) 10 May 2000 (age 24) 4 0   Al-Nassr 2023 AFC Asian Cup WD
GK Hamed Al-Shanqiti (2005-04-26) 26 April 2005 (age 19) 0 0   Al-Shabab v.   Jordan, 21 November 2023

DF Yasser Al-Shahrani (1992-05-25) 25 May 1992 (age 32) 78 2   Al-Hilal v.   Tajikistan, 26 March 2024
DF Mohammed Al-Fatil (1992-01-04) 4 January 1992 (age 32) 15 1   Al-Nassr v.   Tajikistan, 26 March 2024
DF Fawaz Al-Sqoor (1996-04-23) 23 April 1996 (age 28) 5 0   Al-Ittihad v.   Tajikistan, 26 March 2024
DF Waleed Al-Ahmed (1999-05-03) 3 May 1999 (age 25) 2 0   Al-Taawoun v.   Tajikistan, 21 March 2024 INJ
DF Muath Faqeehi (2002-05-30) 30 May 2002 (age 22) 1 0   Al-Taawoun v.   Jordan, 21 November 2023
DF Abdulbasit Hindi (1997-02-02) 2 February 1997 (age 27) 0 0   Al-Ahli v.   Jordan, 21 November 2023
DF Abdulelah Al-Amri (1997-01-15) 15 January 1997 (age 27) 28 1   Al-Nassr v.   Jordan, 21 November 2023 INJ
DF Zakaria Hawsawi (2001-01-12) 12 January 2001 (age 23) 1 0   Al-Ittihad v.   Mali, 17 October 2023
DF Ahmed Bamsaud (1995-11-22) 22 November 1995 (age 28) 7 0   Al-Ittihad v.   South Korea, 12 September 2023
DF Ahmed Sharahili (1994-05-08) 8 May 1994 (age 30) 5 0   Al-Ittihad v.   South Korea, 12 September 2023

MF Abdulellah Al-Malki (1994-10-11) 11 October 1994 (age 29) 33 0   Al-Hilal v.   Tajikistan, 26 March 2024
MF Eid Al-Muwallad (2001-12-14) 14 December 2001 (age 22) 2 0   Al-Okhdood 2023 AFC Asian Cup
MF Fahad Al-Muwallad (1994-09-14) 14 September 1994 (age 29) 76 17   Al-Shabab 2023 AFC Asian Cup INJ
MF Ali Hazazi (1994-02-18) 18 February 1994 (age 30) 8 0   Al-Ettifaq 2023 AFC Asian Cup PRE
MF Khalid Al-Ghannam (2000-11-07) 7 November 2000 (age 23) 3 0   Al-Ettifaq 2023 AFC Asian Cup PRE
MF Abdulelah Hawsawi (2001-06-02) 2 June 2001 (age 23) 0 0   Al-Khaleej v.   Jordan, 21 November 2023
MF Salman Al-Faraj (1989-08-01) 1 August 1989 (age 34) 73 9   Al-Hilal v.   Mali, 17 October 2023
MF Abdulaziz Al-Bishi (1994-03-11) 11 March 1994 (age 30) 22 1   Damac v.   South Korea, 12 September 2023
MF Riyadh Sharahili (1993-04-28) 28 April 1993 (age 31) 9 0   Al-Shabab v.   South Korea, 12 September 2023
MF Sumayhan Al-Nabit (1996-03-27) 27 March 1996 (age 28) 3 1   Al-Ahli v.   South Korea, 12 September 2023
MF Fahad Al-Rashidi (1997-05-16) 16 May 1997 (age 27) 1 0   Al-Ahli v.   South Korea, 12 September 2023

FW Saleh Al-Shehri (1993-11-01) 1 November 1993 (age 30) 35 15   Al-Hilal v.   Tajikistan, 26 March 2024
FW Talal Haji (2007-09-16) 16 September 2007 (age 16) 1 0   Al-Ittihad 2023 AFC Asian Cup
FW Mohammed Maran (2001-02-15) 15 February 2001 (age 23) 6 0   Al-Nassr 2023 AFC Asian Cup PRE
FW Haroune Camara (1998-01-01) 1 January 1998 (age 26) 12 0   Al-Ettifaq v.   Mali, 17 October 2023
FW Haitham Asiri (2001-03-25) 25 March 2001 (age 23) 10 1   Al-Ahli v.   Mali, 17 October 2023

  • COV Player withdrew from the squad due to contracting COVID-19.
  • INJ Player withdrew from the squad due to an injury.
  • PRE Preliminary squad.
  • RET Retired from the national team.
  • SUS Player is serving a suspension.
  • WD Player withdrew from the squad due to non-injury issue.

Player records

edit
As of 20 November 2018[47]
Statistics include official FIFA-recognised matches only
Players in bold are still active with Saudi Arabia.

Most appearances

edit
 
Mohamed Al-Deayea is Saudi Arabia's most capped player with 173 appearances.
Rank Player Caps Goals Career
1 Mohamed Al-Deayea[i] 173 0 1993–2006
2 Mohammed Al-Khilaiwi 163 3 1990–2001
3 Sami Al-Jaber 156 46 1992–2006
4 Abdullah Zubromawi 142 3 1993–2002
5 Osama Hawsawi 138 7 2006–2018
Hussein Abdulghani 138 5 1996–2018
7 Taisir Al-Jassim 134 19 2004–2018
8 Saud Kariri 133 7 2001–2015
9 Mohamed Abd Al-Jawad 121 7 1981–1994
10 Mohammad Al-Shalhoub 118 19 2000–2018
  1. ^ Some sources have Al-Deayea listed with 178 appearances but this includes matches played against Olympic sides, matches that are not considered official for his teammates Sami Al-Jaber or Abdullah Zubromawi.[48][49][50]

Top goalscorers

edit
 
Majed Abdullah is Saudi Arabia's top scorer with 72 goals.
Rank Player Goals Caps Ratio Career
1 Majed Abdullah 72 116 0.61 1978–1994
2 Sami Al-Jaber 46 156 0.29 1992–2006
3 Yasser Al-Qahtani 42 108 0.39 2002–2013
4 Obeid Al-Dosari 41 94 0.44 1994–2002
5 Talal Al-Meshal 32 60 0.53 1998–2006
6 Mohammad Al-Sahlawi 28 42 0.67 2010–2018
Khaled Al-Muwallid 28 114 0.25 1988–1998
8 Hamzah Idris 26 66 0.39 1992–2000
Fahad Al-Mehallel 26 87 0.3 1992–1999
10 Saeed Al-Owairan 24 75 0.32 1992–1998
Ibrahim Al-Shahrani 24 86 0.28 1997–2005

Competitive record

edit
 
Saudi players warm-up before their match against Ukraine during the 2006 FIFA World Cup (19 June 2006)
 
Saudi Arabia players before the 2018 FIFA World Cup opening fixture, against hosts Russia in Group A.
*Denotes draws includes knockout matches decided on penalty shootouts. Red border indicates that the tournament was hosted on home soil. Gold, silver, bronze backgrounds indicate 1st, 2nd and 3rd finishes respectively. Bold text indicates best finish in tournament.

  Champion    Runners-up    Third place  

Overview
Event 1st Place 2nd Place 3rd Place
FIFA Confederations Cup 0 1 0
FIFA Arab Cup 2 1 1
AFC Asian Cup 3 3 0
Arabian Gulf Cup 3 7 8
Asian Games 0 1 1
Arab Games 0 1 1
Total 8 14 11

FIFA World Cup

edit
FIFA World Cup record Qualification record
Year Round Pos. Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
1930 to 1954 Not a FIFA member Not a FIFA member
1958 to 1974 Did not enter Did not enter
  1978 Did not qualify 4 1 0 3 3 7
  1982 10 4 1 5 9 16
  1986 2 0 1 1 0 1
  1990 9 4 3 2 11 9
  1994 Round of 16 12th 4 2 0 2 5 6 11 6 5 0 28 7
  1998 Group stage 28th 3 0 1 2 2 7 14 9 3 2 26 7
    2002 32nd 3 0 0 3 0 12 14 11 2 1 47 8
  2006 28th 3 0 1 2 2 7 12 10 2 0 24 2
  2010 Did not qualify 16 8 5 3 25 15
  2014 8 3 3 2 14 7
  2018 Group stage 26th 3 1 0 2 2 7 18 12 3 3 45 14
  2022 25th 3 1 0 2 3 5 18 13 4 1 34 10
      2026 To be determined 6 4 1 1 12 3
      2030 To be determined
  2034 Qualified as hosts Qualified as hosts
Total Round of 16 6/17 19 4 2 13 14 44 141 84 33 24 276 106

AFC Asian Cup

edit
 
The Final of the 1984 AFC Asian Cup, against China. Saudi Arabia won their first AFC Asian Cup in their first entry to the competition.
AFC Asian Cup record Qualification record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
  1956 Not an AFC member Not an AFC member
  1960
  1964
  1968
  1972
  1976 Withdrew 6 3 1 2 12 5
  1980 Withdrew
  1984 Champions 1st 6 3 3 0 7 3 4 4 0 0 19 0
  1988 Champions 1st 6 3 3 0 5 1 Automatic qualification as champions
  1992 Runners-up 2nd 5 2 2 1 8 3 Automatic qualification as champions
  1996 Champions 1st 6 3 2 1 11 6 4 4 0 0 10 0
  2000 Runners-up 2nd 6 3 1 2 11 8 Automatic qualification as champions
  2004 Group stage 13th 3 0 1 2 3 5 6 6 0 0 31 1
        2007 Runners-up 2nd 6 4 1 1 12 6 6 5 0 1 21 4
  2011 Group stage 15th 3 0 0 3 1 8 Automatic qualification as runners-up
  2015 10th 3 1 0 2 5 5 6 5 1 0 9 3
  2019 Round of 16 12th 4 2 0 2 6 3 8 6 2 0 28 4
  2023 9th 4 2 2 0 5 2 8 6 2 0 22 4
  2027 Qualified as hosts 6 4 1 1 12 3
Total 3 Titles 12/19 52 23 15 14 74 50 54 43 7 4 164 24

FIFA Arab Cup

edit
FIFA Arab Cup record
Year Result Pld W D L GF GA
  1963 Did not enter
  1964
  1966
  1985 Third place 4 2 1 1 7 3
  1988 Group stage 4 0 2 2 1 4
  1992 Runners-up 4 2 1 1 7 5
  1998 Champions 4 4 0 0 12 3
  2002 Champions 6 5 1 0 11 3
2009 Cancelled
  2012 Fourth place 4 1 1 2 6 5
  2021 Group stage 3 0 1 2 1 3
Total 7/10 29 14 7 8 45 26

West Asian Football Federation Championship

edit
WAFF Championship record
Year Round Pld W D L GF GA
  2000 Did not participate
  2002
  2004
  2007
  2008
  2010
  2012 Group stage 3 1 1 1 1 1
  2014 2 0 1 1 1 4
  2019 3 0 1 2 1 5
  2023 Qualified
Total 4/10 8 1 3 4 3 10

Arabian Gulf Cup

edit
Arabian Gulf Cup record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1970 Third place 3rd 3 0 2 1 2 4
  1972 Runners-up 2nd 3 2 1 0 10 2
  1974 Runners-up 2nd 4 3 0 1 9 6
  1976 Group stage 5th 6 2 0 4 8 14
  1979 Third place 3rd 6 3 2 1 14 4
  1982 Group stage 4th 5 2 1 2 6 4
  1984 Third place 3rd 6 3 1 2 9 8
  1986 Third place 3rd 6 3 0 3 9 9
  1988 Third place 3rd 6 2 3 1 5 4
  1990 Withdrew
  1992 Third place 3rd 5 3 0 2 6 4
  1994 Champions 1st 5 4 1 0 10 4
  1996 Third place 3rd 5 2 2 1 8 6
  1998 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 2 0 5 2
  2002 Champions 1st 5 4 1 0 10 3
  2003–04 Champions 1st 6 4 2 0 8 2
  2004 Group stage 5th 3 1 0 2 4 5
  2007 Third place 3rd 4 2 1 1 4 3
  2009 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 2 0 10 0
  2010 Runners-up 2nd 5 2 2 1 6 2
  2013 Group stage 5th 3 1 0 2 2 3
  2014 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 1 1 9 5
  2017–18 Group stage 6th 3 1 1 1 2 3
  2019 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 0 2 7 5
  2023 Group stage 6th 3 1 0 2 3 4
Total 3 Titles 24/25 112 57 25 30 166 106

Arab Games

edit
Arab Games record
Year Result Pld W D L GF GA
  1953 Did not enter
  1957 Group stage 3 1 1 1 4 3
  1961 Fifth place 5 1 0 4 4 38
  1965 Did not enter
  1976 Runners-up 6 3 1 2 9 4
  1985 Fourth place 4 3 0 1 6 3
  1997 Did not enter
  1999 First round 2 0 1 1 2 3
  2007 Third place 4 1 1 2 5 5
  2011 First round 2 0 1 1 0 2
2023–present See Saudi Arabia national under-23 football team
Total 7/10 26 9 5 12 30 58
*Denotes draws and includes knockout matches decided via penalty shoot-out.

Asian Games

edit
Asian Games record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1951 Did not enter
  1954
  1958
  1962
  1966
  1970
  1974
  1978 Group stage 10th 3 0 2 1 3 4
  1982 Semi-finals Third place 6 3 2 1 7 4
  1986 Final Runners-up 6 3 2 1 9 6
  1990 Quarter-finals 5th 3 2 1 0 6 0
  1994 Quarter-finals 5th 5 3 0 2 9 10
  1998 Did not enter
2002–present See Saudi Arabia national under-23 football team
Total Final 5/13 23 11 7 5 34 24

FIFA Confederations Cup

edit
FIFA Confederations Cup record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1992 Runners-up 2nd 2 1 0 1 4 3
  1995 Group stage 5th 2 0 0 2 0 4
  1997 7th 3 1 0 2 1 8
  1999 Fourth place 4th 5 1 1 3 8 16
    2001 Did not qualify
  2003
  2005
  2009
  2013
  2017
Total Runners-up 4/10 12 3 1 8 13 31

All-time results

edit

The following table shows Saudi Arabia's all-time international record, correct as of 6 June 2024.

Against Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA GD
Total 729 343 164 212 1096 767 +329

Honours

edit

International

edit

Continental

edit

Regional

edit

Other

edit

Titles

edit

AFC Asian Cup

edit
Preceded by Asian Cup Champions
1984 (First title)
1988 (Second title)
Succeeded by
Preceded by Asian Cup Champions
1996 (Third title)
Succeeded by

FIFA Arab Cup

edit
Preceded by Arab Cup Champions
1998 (First title)
2002 (Second title)
Succeeded by

Arabian Gulf Cup

edit
Preceded by Gulf Cup Champions
1994 (First title)
Succeeded by
Preceded by Gulf Cup Champions
2002 (Second title)
2003–04 (Third title)
Succeeded by

References

edit
  1. ^ "FIFA Century Club" (PDF). Fifa.com. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 September 2015. Retrieved 10 September 2016.
  2. ^ "Majed Abdullah". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 22 March 2019. Retrieved 2 February 2023.
  3. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Men's World Ranking". FIFA. 18 July 2024. Retrieved 18 July 2024.
  4. ^ Elo rankings change compared to one year ago. "World Football Elo Ratings". eloratings.net. 15 July 2024. Retrieved 15 July 2024.
  5. ^ "Saudi Arabia confirmed as hosts of the AFC Asian Cup 2027". the-AFC. Archived from the original on 21 February 2023. Retrieved 12 May 2023.
  6. ^ Panja, Tariq (15 November 2023). "Inside Man: How FIFA Guided the World Cup to Saudi Arabia". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on 17 November 2023. Retrieved 17 November 2023.
  7. ^ "1953.. أول بعثة رياضية إلى الخارج" (in Arabic). Archived from the original on 23 May 2022. Retrieved 13 October 2019.
  8. ^ "Saudi Arabia - History". Archived from the original on 27 March 2023. Retrieved 2 February 2023.
  9. ^ "Flashback: Saudi Arabia's historic triumph at the 1984 AFC Asian Cup". the-AFC. Retrieved 12 May 2023.
  10. ^ "Saudi-Arabien - Südkorea 4:3 (Asian Cup 1988 Katar, Finale)". weltfussball.de (in German). Archived from the original on 12 May 2023. Retrieved 12 May 2023.
  11. ^ "Flashback To UAE 1996: The Green Falcons win third AFC Asian Cup". the-AFC. Archived from the original on 12 May 2023. Retrieved 12 May 2023.
  12. ^ "2007 AFC Asian Cup: Iraq's amazing triumph revisited". the-AFC. Archived from the original on 15 May 2023. Retrieved 12 May 2023.
  13. ^ "When Saudi Arabia dreamed of a World Cup miracle". Arab News. 7 April 2020. Archived from the original on 6 July 2023. Retrieved 12 May 2023.
  14. ^ "One-sided World Cup games[4]- Chinadaily.com.cn". www.chinadaily.com.cn. Archived from the original on 12 May 2023. Retrieved 12 May 2023.
  15. ^ vaughanu (10 September 2009). "Saudi Arabia 2 – 2 Bahrain (agg 2-2): History beckons for Bahrain". Muslim Soccer. Retrieved 15 September 2023.
  16. ^ "Saudi Arabia make Asian Cup exit". Al Jazeera. Retrieved 15 September 2023.
  17. ^ "Saudi Arabia reaches World Cup finals with dramatic win over Japan". Arab News. 6 September 2017. Archived from the original on 10 November 2017. Retrieved 8 November 2017.
  18. ^ Fletcher, Paul (14 June 2018). "World Cup 2018: Russia thrash Saudi Arabia 5-0 in tournament". BBC Sport. Moscow: BBC. Archived from the original on 15 June 2018. Retrieved 21 June 2018.
  19. ^ Bond, George (20 June 2018). "Are Saudi Arabia the worst team ever at a World Cup?". Talksport. Archived from the original on 21 June 2018. Retrieved 21 June 2018.
  20. ^ "World Cup: Uruguay defeat Saudi Arabia 1-0, qualify for knockout stages". Euronews. 20 June 2018. Archived from the original on 21 June 2018. Retrieved 21 June 2018.
  21. ^ "Highlights: Saudi Arabia beat Egypt as both nations eliminated". itv.com. ITV plc. 25 June 2018. Archived from the original on 27 June 2018. Retrieved 27 June 2018.
  22. ^ Chowdhury, Saj (25 June 2018). "Mohamed Salah scored his second goal of the World Cup but Egypt ended their campaign pointless with defeat by Saudi Arabia at Volgograd Arena". BBC Sport. BBC. Archived from the original on 24 June 2020. Retrieved 27 June 2018.
  23. ^ "AFC Asian Cup 2019: Saudi Arabia 0-2 Qatar in Abu Dhabi". Archived from the original on 29 January 2020. Retrieved 2 April 2020.
  24. ^ Dunne, Robbie (21 January 2019). "Japan see off Saudi to reach quarters". Diario AS. Archived from the original on 12 May 2023. Retrieved 12 May 2023.
  25. ^ "Some booed Saudi-Palestinian soccer match in West Bank even before it started". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 22 October 2019. Retrieved 20 October 2019.
  26. ^ "2022 FIFA World Cup Qatar Qualifiers - Asia - Matches - Palestine - Saudi Arabia". www.fifa.com. Archived from the original on 1 September 2019. Retrieved 20 October 2019.
  27. ^ "Schedule". AS.com. 2 April 2022. Archived from the original on 18 July 2022. Retrieved 18 July 2022.
  28. ^ "Saudi Arabia declares national holiday after shock win". The 42. 22 November 2022. Archived from the original on 23 November 2022. Retrieved 23 November 2022.
  29. ^ "'It's coming to Mecca': Fans go wild as Saudi Arabia stun Argentina". Middle East Eye. Archived from the original on 7 January 2023. Retrieved 7 January 2023.
  30. ^ "Poland 2-0 Saudi Arabia: Robert Lewandowski bags elusive World Cup goal as Poles down Qatar giantkillers". Eurosport. 26 November 2022. Archived from the original on 26 November 2022. Retrieved 7 January 2023.
  31. ^ "Mexico out despite victory over Saudi Arabia". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 3 January 2023. Retrieved 7 January 2023.
  32. ^ https://apnews.com/article/asian-cup-scores-saudi-arabia-oman-1a5236cbc394039df913bfcb314128e8
  33. ^ https://apnews.com/article/asian-cup-thailand-oman-score-saudi-kyrgyzstan-08a4f1afdb5b2e12a3cf819d317f5366
  34. ^ https://www.arabnews.com/node/2448221/sport
  35. ^ https://sports.yahoo.com/saudi-arabia-1-1-south-191200891.html
  36. ^ "UNDER THE RADAR BUT BRIMMING WITH OPTIMISM". Archived from the original on 15 June 2018. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  37. ^ "Saudi Arabian Football Federation and Nike to end partnership - Saudi Arabian Football Federation". www.saff.com.sa. Archived from the original on 12 May 2023. Retrieved 12 May 2023.
  38. ^ "Adidas launches all-new Saudi Arabian Football Federation home, away jerseys". Arab News. 22 March 2023. Archived from the original on 6 July 2023. Retrieved 12 May 2023.
  39. ^ "International Football's 10 Most Politically-Charged Football Rivalries | Bleacher Report | Latest News, Videos and Highlights". Bleacher Report. Retrieved 19 September 2020.
  40. ^ "Policy Goals: Soccer and the Saudi-Iranian Rivalry | Center for Strategic and International Studies". Retrieved 19 September 2020.
  41. ^ Hersh, Phil (15 October 1993). "WORLD CUP '94-POLITICAL FOOTBALL". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2 January 2024.
  42. ^ "Gulf Cup shifts from Iraq to Saudi Arabia". AP News. 8 October 2013. Retrieved 2 January 2024.
  43. ^ "Gulf Cup shifts from Iraq to Saudi Arabia". Arab News. Retrieved 2 January 2024.
  44. ^ "Ex-Italy boss Roberto Mancini to be unveiled tomorrow as new Saudi Arabia NT coach". 27 August 2023. Retrieved 27 August 2023.
  45. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Heyes, Apollo (25 August 2023). "Mancini builds staff for Saudi national team". Football Italia.
  46. ^ "مانشيني يعلن قائمة الأخضر لمواجهتي باكستان والأردن ضمن تصفيات كأس العالم 2026".
  47. ^ Naeim Albakr. "Saudi Arabia – Record International Players". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 10 July 2022. Retrieved 14 September 2013.
  48. ^ Mamrud, Roberto. "Mohamed Al-Deayea - Century of International Appearances". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 6 April 2023. Retrieved 22 May 2023.
  49. ^ Mamrud, Roberto. "Sami Abdullah Al-Jaber - Century of International Appearances". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 18 April 2023. Retrieved 22 May 2023.
  50. ^ Mamrud, Roberto. "Abdullah Suleiman Al-Zubromawi - Century of International Appearances". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 28 January 2023. Retrieved 22 May 2023.
edit