The 2023 AFC Asian Cup was the 18th edition of the AFC Asian Cup, the quadrennial international football tournament organised by the Asian Football Confederation (AFC). It involved 24 national teams after its expansion in 2019, with the host Qatar the defending champions.[3][4]

2023 AFC Asian Cup
AFC Asian Cup Qatar 2023
كأس آسيا 2023
Tournament details
Host countryQatar
Dates12 January – 10 February 2024
Teams24 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s)9 (in 5 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Qatar (2nd title)
Runners-up Jordan
Third place Iran
Fourth place South Korea
Tournament statistics
Matches played51
Goals scored132 (2.59 per match)
Attendance1,507,790 (29,565 per match)
Top scorer(s)Qatar Akram Afif (8 goals)
Best player(s)Qatar Akram Afif[1]
Best goalkeeperQatar Meshaal Barsham[2]
Fair play award Qatar
2019
2027

On 17 October 2022, the AFC announced that the tournament would be held in Qatar, replacing the original host China.[5] Due to the high summer temperatures and Qatar's participation in the 2023 CONCACAF Gold Cup, the tournament was postponed to 12 January – 10 February 2024, while retaining the original name for both existing sponsorship and logistical purposes.[6][7]

Hosts and defending champions Qatar successfully retained their title, defeating Jordan 3–1 in the final.[8]

Host selection edit

China was acclaimed as the host country on 4 June 2019, as sole finishing bidder, days just prior to the 69th FIFA Congress in Paris, France.[9] The tournament was originally scheduled to be held from 16 June to 16 July 2023.[10] On 14 May 2022, the AFC announced that China would not host the tournament due to the COVID-19 pandemic and China's Zero-COVID policy.[11] Due to China's relinquishment of its hosting rights,[12][13] the AFC conducted a second round of bidding, with a deadline for submissions scheduled on 17 October 2022.[14] Four nations submitted bids: Australia, Indonesia, Qatar, and South Korea.[15] However, Australia subsequently withdrew in September 2022,[16] as did Indonesia on 15 October.[17] On 17 October, the AFC announced that Qatar had won the bid and would host the tournament.[5]

Venues edit

Five host cities were submitted in the 2023 bid, including seven stadiums previously prepared for the 2022 FIFA World Cup. On 5 April 2023, the AFC announced the eight stadiums across four host cities for the tournament.[18] On 21 August 2023, Lusail Stadium was added as a ninth venue.[19] All but one (Stadium 974) of the host stadiums from the 2022 FIFA World Cup were selected for the tournament, along with Jassim bin Hamad Stadium, which hosted matches during the 2011 edition, and Abdullah bin Khalifa Stadium, which had not hosted any international tournament previously.

Lusail Stadium hosted the opening match on 12 January.[19] Ahmad bin Ali Stadium in Al Rayyan and Al Thumama Stadium in Doha hosted the semi-final matches, with Lusail hosted the final held on 10 February.[19]

On 5 January 2024, the Main Media Centre for the coverage of the tournament was officially inaugurated in Msheireb Downtown Doha.[20]

City Stadium Capacity
Al Khor Al Bayt Stadium 68,895
Lusail Lusail Stadium 88,966
Al Rayyan Ahmad bin Ali Stadium 45,032
Education City Stadium 44,667
Jassim bin Hamad Stadium 15,000
Khalifa International Stadium 45,857
Doha Abdullah bin Khalifa Stadium 10,000
Al Thumama Stadium 44,400
Al Wakrah Al Janoub Stadium 44,325

Teams edit

 
  Qualified for Asian Cup
  Failed to qualify
  Disqualified or withdrew
  Not an AFC member

The first two rounds of qualification also served as the Asian qualification for the 2022 World Cup. Qatar, the host of the World Cup, participated only in the second round to qualify for the 2023 Asian Cup (which they were later selected as hosts for after China withdrew its hosting rights).

Qualified teams edit

Of the 24 teams appearing, 20 teams were returning after appearing in the 2019 edition.

Tajikistan were the only debutant in the competition, while Hong Kong marked their return for the first time in 56 years. Indonesia and Malaysia both qualified for the first time since hosting the 2007 AFC Asian Cup.

Four nations from the previous edition failed to qualify (North Korea, Turkmenistan, Yemen, and the Philippines). India was the only SAFF representative in this edition, while it was the first time that five teams from the AFF managed to reach the finals (Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam). Only two teams from WAFF failed to qualify for this tournament (Yemen and Kuwait). Iran meanwhile extended their qualification record; this was their fifteenth straight appearance in the tournament, having qualified for every edition since 1968.

Team Method of
qualification
Date of
qualification
Finals
appearance
Last
appearance
Previous best
performance
  China Original hosts and second round Group A runners-up 4 June 2019[a] 13th 2019 Runners-up (1984, 2004)
  Japan Second round Group F winners 28 May 2021 10th 2019 Winners (1992, 2000, 2004, 2011)
  Syria Second round Group A winners 7 June 2021 7th 2019 Group stage (1980, 1984, 1988, 1996, 2011, 2019)
  Qatar Hosts and Second round Group E winners 7 June 2021 11th 2019 Winners (2019)
  South Korea Second round Group H winners 9 June 2021 15th 2019 Winners (1956, 1960)
  Australia Second round Group B winners 11 June 2021 5th 2019 Winners (2015)
  Iran Second round Group C winners 15 June 2021 15th 2019 Winners (1968, 1972, 1976)
  Saudi Arabia Second round Group D winners 15 June 2021 11th 2019 Winners (1984, 1988, 1996)
  United Arab Emirates Second round Group G winners 15 June 2021 11th 2019 Runners-up (1996)
  Iraq Second round Group C runners-up 15 June 2021 10th 2019 Winners (2007)
  Oman Second round Group E runners-up 15 June 2021 5th 2019 Round of 16 (2019)
  Vietnam Second round Group G runners-up 15 June 2021 5th 2019 Fourth place (1956,[b] 1960[b])
  Lebanon Second round Group H runners-up 15 June 2021 3rd 2019 Group stage (2000, 2019)
  Palestine Third round Group B winners 14 June 2022 3rd 2019 Group stage (2015, 2019)
  Uzbekistan Third round Group C winners 14 June 2022 8th 2019 Fourth place (2011)
  Thailand Third round Group C runners-up 14 June 2022 8th 2019 Third place (1972)
  India Third round Group D winners 14 June 2022 5th 2019 Runners-up (1964)
  Hong Kong Third round Group D runners-up 14 June 2022 4th 1968 Third place (1956)
  Tajikistan Third round Group F winners 14 June 2022 1st Debut None
  Kyrgyzstan Third round Group F runners-up 14 June 2022 2nd 2019 Round of 16 (2019)
  Bahrain Third round Group E winners 14 June 2022 7th 2019 Fourth place (2004)
  Malaysia Third round Group E runners-up 14 June 2022 4th 2007 Group stage (1976, 1980, 2007)
  Jordan Third round Group A winners 14 June 2022 5th 2019 Quarter-finals (2004, 2011)
  Indonesia Third round Group A runners-up 14 June 2022 5th 2007 Group stage (1996, 2000, 2004, 2007)
  1. ^ China was awarded hosting rights on 4 June 2019. They later finished as second round Group A runners-up on 15 June 2021, which would earn them a qualification regardless of the hosting status. China later withdrew their hosting rights on 14 May 2022.
  2. ^ a b As South Vietnam

Draw edit

The draw was held at the Katara Opera House in Doha on 11 May 2023.[21]

From the April 2023 FIFA World Rankings[22]
Pot 1 Pot 2 Pot 3 Pot 4
  Qatar (61) (hosts)
  Japan (20)
  Iran (24)
  South Korea (27)
  Australia (29)
  Saudi Arabia (54)
  Iraq (67)
  United Arab Emirates (72)
  Oman (73)
  Uzbekistan (74)
  China (81)
  Jordan (84)
  Bahrain (85)
  Syria (90)
  Palestine (93)
  Vietnam (95)
  Kyrgyzstan (96)
  Lebanon (99)
  India (101)
  Tajikistan (109)
  Thailand (114)
  Malaysia (138)
  Hong Kong (147)
  Indonesia (149)

Draw result edit

Teams were drawn into Groups A to F. For the first time in AFC Asian Cup history, the teams from lowest pots were drawn first but not assigned to the positions of their groups, following by number orders of the group stage, as in previous editions. Pot 1 teams were assigned to the first positions of their groups, while next the positions of all other teams were drawn separately from Pot 4 to 2 (for the purposes of determining the match schedules in each group).

The groups were confirmed following the draw:

Group A
Pos Team
A1   Qatar
A2   China
A3   Tajikistan
A4   Lebanon
Group B
Pos Team
B1   Australia
B2   Uzbekistan
B3   Syria
B4   India
Group C
Pos Team
C1   Iran
C2   United Arab Emirates
C3   Hong Kong
C4   Palestine
Group D
Pos Team
D1   Japan
D2   Indonesia
D3   Iraq
D4   Vietnam
Group E
Pos Team
E1   South Korea
E2   Malaysia
E3   Jordan
E4   Bahrain
Group F
Pos Team
F1   Saudi Arabia
F2   Thailand
F3   Kyrgyzstan
F4   Oman

Squads edit

Each team was required to registered a squad with a minimum of 18 players and a maximum of 23 players, at least three of whom had to be goalkeepers.[23] In December 2023, the maximum was increased to 26 players.[24]

Officiating edit

On 14 September 2023, the AFC announced the list of 33 referees, 37 assistant referees, two stand-by referees and eight stand-by assistant referees for the tournament, including two female referees and three female assistant referees. Video Assistant Referee (VAR) was used for the entire tournament following its implementation from the quarter-final stage onwards in the 2019 edition.[25][26] The Semi-Automated Offside Technology (SAOT) system, which utilized twelve specialized cameras and artificial intelligence, was also implemented at all 51 matches. This marked the first time that SAOT was in place at an AFC competition and made the AFC the first confederation to apply the system at the continental men's national team level.[27]

Referees
Assistant referees
  •   Ashley Beecham
  •   Anton Shchetinin
  •   Zhang Cheng
  •   Zhou Fei
  •   Alireza Ildorom
  •   Saeid Ghasemi
  •   Ahmed Al-Baghdadi
  •   Watheq Al-Swaiedi
  •   Makoto Bozono
  •   Jun Mihara
  •   Takumi Takagi
  •   Naomi Teshirogi
  •   Mohammad Al-Kalaf
  •   Ahmad Al-Roalle
  •   Ahmad Abbas
  •   Abdulhadi Al-Anezi
  •   Mohd Arif Shamil Bin Abd Rasid
  •   Mohamad Zairul Bin Khalil Tan
  •   Abu Bakar Al-Amri
  •   Rashid Al-Ghaithi
  •   Saoud Al-Maqaleh
  •   Taleb Al-Marri
  •   Zaid Al-Shammari
  •   Yasir Al-Sultan
  •   Abdul Hannan Bin Abdul Hasim
  •   Ronnie Koh Min Kiat
  •   Kim Kyoung-min
  •   Park Sang-jun
  •   Yoon Jae-yeol
  •   Ali Ahmad
  •   Mohamad Kazzaz
  •   Tanate Chuchuen
  •   Rawut Nakarit
  •   Mohamed Al-Hammadi
  •   Hasan Al-Mahri
  •   Timur Gaynullin
  •   Andrey Tsapenko
Stand-by referees
Stand-by assistant referees
  •   Cao Yi
  •   Cheung Yim Yau
  •   Ismail Al-Hafi
  •   Saad Al-Fadhli
  •   Abdulrahman Hussein
  •   Mohammed Al-Abakry
  •   John Chia Eng Wah
  •   Farkhad Abdullaev

Opening ceremony edit

The opening ceremony, named "The Lost Chapter of Kelileh o Demneh" took place at Lusail Stadium, before the opening game between Qatar and Lebanon on 12 January 2024.[28][29]

Group stage edit

 
Result of teams participating in the 2023 AFC Asian Cup

Tiebreakers edit

Teams were ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss), and if tied on points, the following tiebreaking criteria were applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings:[23]

  1. Points in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  2. Goal difference in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  3. Goals scored in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  4. If more than two teams were tied, and after applying all head-to-head criteria above, a subset of teams were still tied, all head-to-head criteria above were reapplied exclusively to this subset of teams;
  5. Goal difference in all group matches;
  6. Goals scored in all group matches;
  7. Penalty shoot-out if only two teams were tied and they played each other in the last round of the group;
  8. Disciplinary points (yellow card = 1 point, red card as a result of two yellow cards = 3 points, direct red card = 3 points, yellow card followed by direct red card = 4 points);
  9. Drawing of lots.

Group A edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Qatar (H) 3 3 0 0 5 0 +5 9 Advance to knockout stage
2   Tajikistan 3 1 1 1 2 2 0 4
3   China 3 0 2 1 0 1 −1 2
4   Lebanon 3 0 1 2 1 5 −4 1
Source: AFC
(H) Hosts
Qatar  3–0  Lebanon
  • Afif   45', 90+6'
  • Ali   56'
Report
Attendance: 82,490
China  0–0  Tajikistan
Report

Lebanon  0–0  China
Report
Attendance: 14,137
Tajikistan  0–1  Qatar
Report
Attendance: 57,460

Qatar  1–0  China
Report
Tajikistan  2–1  Lebanon
Report

Group B edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Australia 3 2 1 0 4 1 +3 7 Advance to knockout stage
2   Uzbekistan 3 1 2 0 4 1 +3 5
3   Syria 3 1 1 1 1 1 0 4
4   India 3 0 0 3 0 6 −6 0
Source: AFC
Australia  2–0  India
Report
Uzbekistan  0–0  Syria
Report

Syria  0–1  Australia
Report
India  0–3  Uzbekistan
Report
Attendance: 38,491
Referee: Fu Ming (China)

Australia  1–1  Uzbekistan
Report
Attendance: 15,290
Referee: Yusuke Araki (Japan)
Syria  1–0  India
Report
Attendance: 42,787

Group C edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Iran 3 3 0 0 7 2 +5 9 Advance to knockout stage
2   United Arab Emirates 3 1 1 1 5 4 +1 4
3   Palestine 3 1 1 1 5 5 0 4
4   Hong Kong 3 0 0 3 1 7 −6 0
Source: AFC
United Arab Emirates  3–1  Hong Kong
Report
Iran  4–1  Palestine
Report

Palestine  1–1  United Arab Emirates
Nasser   50' (o.g.) Report Adil   23'
Attendance: 41,986
Referee: Ahmad Al-Ali (Kuwait)
Hong Kong  0–1  Iran
Report

Iran  2–1  United Arab Emirates
Report
Hong Kong  0–3  Palestine
Report

Group D edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Iraq 3 3 0 0 8 4 +4 9 Advance to knockout stage
2   Japan 3 2 0 1 8 5 +3 6
3   Indonesia 3 1 0 2 3 6 −3 3
4   Vietnam 3 0 0 3 4 8 −4 0
Source: AFC
Japan  4–2  Vietnam
Report
Attendance: 17,385
Indonesia  1–3  Iraq
Report

Iraq  2–1  Japan
Report
Vietnam  0–1  Indonesia
Report

Japan  3–1  Indonesia
Report Walsh   90+1'
Attendance: 26,453
Iraq  3–2  Vietnam
Report

Group E edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Bahrain 3 2 0 1 3 3 0 6 Advance to knockout stage
2   South Korea 3 1 2 0 8 6 +2 5
3   Jordan 3 1 1 1 6 3 +3 4
4   Malaysia 3 0 1 2 3 8 −5 1
Source: AFC
South Korea  3–1  Bahrain
Report
Attendance: 8,388
Referee: Ma Ning (China)
Malaysia  0–4  Jordan
Report



Jordan  2–2  South Korea
Report
Attendance: 36,627
Referee: Salman Falahi (Qatar)
Bahrain  1–0  Malaysia
Report

South Korea  3–3  Malaysia
Report
Jordan  0–1  Bahrain
Report Helal   34'

Group F edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Saudi Arabia 3 2 1 0 4 1 +3 7 Advance to knockout stage
2   Thailand 3 1 2 0 2 0 +2 5
3   Oman 3 0 2 1 2 3 −1 2
4   Kyrgyzstan 3 0 1 2 1 5 −4 1
Source: AFC
Thailand  2–0  Kyrgyzstan
Report
Saudi Arabia  2–1  Oman
Report

Oman  0–0  Thailand
Report
Kyrgyzstan  0–2  Saudi Arabia
Report
Attendance: 39,557
Referee: Jumpei Iida (Japan)

Saudi Arabia  0–0  Thailand
Report
Kyrgyzstan  1–1  Oman
Report

Ranking of third-placed teams edit

The four best third-placed teams from the six groups advanced to the knockout stage along with the six group winners and six runners-up.

Pos Grp Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1 E   Jordan 3 1 1 1 6 3 +3 4 Advance to knockout stage
2 C   Palestine 3 1 1 1 5 5 0 4
3 B   Syria 3 1 1 1 1 1 0 4
4 D   Indonesia 3 1 0 2 3 6 −3 3
5 F   Oman 3 0 2 1 2 3 −1 2
6 A   China 3 0 2 1 0 1 −1 2
Source: AFC
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Goals scored; 4) Disciplinary points; 5) Drawing of lots.[30]

Knockout stage edit

In the knockout stage, extra time and a penalty shoot-out were used to decide the winner if necessary.

Bracket edit

 
Round of 16Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
              
 
28 January – Al Rayyan (ABAS)
 
 
  Tajikistan (p)1 (5)
 
2 February – Al Rayyan (ABAS)
 
  United Arab Emirates1 (3)
 
  Tajikistan0
 
29 January – Al Rayyan (KIS)
 
  Jordan1
 
  Iraq2
 
6 February – Al Rayyan (ABAS)
 
  Jordan3
 
  Jordan2
 
28 January – Al Rayyan (JBHS)
 
  South Korea0
 
  Australia4
 
2 February – Al Wakrah
 
  Indonesia0
 
  Australia1
 
30 January – Al Rayyan (ECS)
 
  South Korea (a.e.t.)2
 
  Saudi Arabia1 (2)
 
10 February – Lusail
 
  South Korea (p)1 (4)
 
  Jordan 1
 
31 January – Doha (ABKS)
 
  Qatar3
 
  Iran (p) 1 (5)
 
3 February – Al Rayyan (ECS)
 
  Syria1 (3)
 
  Iran2
 
31 January – Doha (ATS)
 
  Japan1
 
  Bahrain1
 
7 February – Doha (ATS)
 
  Japan3
 
  Iran2
 
29 January – Al Khor
 
  Qatar3
 
  Qatar2
 
3 February – Al Khor
 
  Palestine1
 
  Qatar (p)1 (3)
 
30 January – Al Wakrah
 
  Uzbekistan1 (2)
 
  Uzbekistan2
 
 
  Thailand1
 

All times are local, AST (UTC+3).

Round of 16 edit

Australia  4–0  Indonesia
Report

Tajikistan  1–1 (a.e.t.)  United Arab Emirates
Report
Penalties
5–3
Attendance: 33,584
Referee: Yusuke Araki (Japan)

Iraq  2–3  Jordan
Report

Qatar  2–1  Palestine
Report
Attendance: 63,753
Referee: Ma Ning (China)

Uzbekistan  2–1  Thailand
Report

Saudi Arabia  1–1 (a.e.t.)  South Korea
Report
Penalties
2–4

Bahrain  1–3  Japan
Report
Attendance: 31,832
Referee: Ahmad Al-Ali (Kuwait)

Iran  1–1 (a.e.t.)  Syria
Report
Penalties
5–3

Quarter-finals edit

Tajikistan  0–1  Jordan
Report
Attendance: 35,530
Referee: Fu Ming (China)

Australia  1–2 (a.e.t.)  South Korea
Report
Attendance: 39,632
Referee: Ahmed Al-Kaf (Oman)

Iran  2–1  Japan
Report
Attendance: 35,640
Referee: Ma Ning (China)

Qatar  1–1 (a.e.t.)  Uzbekistan
Report
Penalties
3–2
Attendance: 58,791

Semi-finals edit

Jordan  2–0  South Korea
Report

Iran  2–3  Qatar
Report
Attendance: 40,342
Referee: Ahmad Al-Ali (Kuwait)

Final edit

Jordan  1–3  Qatar
Report
Attendance: 86,492
Referee: Ma Ning (China)[31]

Statistics edit

Goalscorers edit

There were 132 goals scored in 51 matches, for an average of 2.59 goals per match.

8 goals

6 goals

4 goals

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

1 own goal

Source: AFC

Discipline edit

A player was automatically suspended for the next match for the following offences:[23]

  • Receiving a red card (red card suspensions could be extended for serious offences)
  • Receiving two yellow cards in two matches
  • After reaching the semi-finals, all yellow cards and red cards received are reset. This means that even if a player receives a yellow card in the semi-finals, any previous cards won't count, allowing them to participate in the final

The following suspensions occurred during the tournament:

Player(s)/Official(s) Offence(s) Suspension(s)
  Hazza Ali Positive doping sample after Group E match vs South Korea (matchday 1; 15 January 2024)[a] Group E vs Jordan (matchday 3; 25 January 2024)[33]
  Amadoni Kamolov   in Group A vs Qatar (matchday 2; 17 January 2024) Group A vs Lebanon (matchday 3; 22 January 2024)
Round of 16 vs United Arab Emirates (28 January 2024)
Quarter-final vs Jordan (2 February 2024)
  Pedro Miguel   in Group A vs Lebanon (matchday 1; 12 January 2024)
  in Group A vs Tajikistan (matchday 2; 17 January 2024)
Group A vs China (matchday 3; 22 January 2024)
  Khalifa Al Hammadi   in Group C vs Palestine (matchday 2; 18 January 2024) Group C vs Iran (matchday 3; 23 January 2024)
  Paulo Bento (manager)     in Group C vs Palestine (matchday 2; 18 January 2024)[32]
  Lê Phạm Thành Long     in Group D vs Indonesia (matchday 2; 19 January 2024) Group D vs Iraq (matchday 3; 24 January 2024)
  Theerathon Bunmathan   in Group F vs Kyrgyzstan (matchday 1; 16 January 2024)
  in Group F vs Oman (matchday 2; 21 January 2024)
Group F vs Saudi Arabia (matchday 3; 25 January 2024)
  Ayzar Akmatov
  Kimi Merk
  in Group F vs Saudi Arabia (matchday 2; 21 January 2024) Group F vs Oman (matchday 3; 25 January 2024)
  Kassem El Zein   in Group A vs Tajikistan (matchday 3; 22 January 2024) Suspension to be served outside the tournament
  Hossein Kanaanizadegan   in Group C vs Palestine (matchday 1; 14 January 2024)
  in Group C vs UAE (matchday 3; 23 January 2024)
Round of 16 vs Syria (31 January 2024)
  Khuất Văn Khang     in Group D vs Iraq (matchday 3; 24 January 2024) Suspension to be served outside the tournament
  Aymen Hussein     in Round of 16 vs Jordan (29 January 2024)
  Hamza Al-Dardour   in Round of 16 vs Iraq (29 January 2024) Quarter-final vs Tajikistan (2 February 2024)
  Nizar Al-Rashdan   in Group E vs Malaysia (matchday 1; 15 January 2024)
  in Round of 16 vs Iraq (29 January 2024)
  Abdukodir Khusanov   in Group B vs Syria (matchday 1; 13 January 2024)
  in Round of 16 vs Thailand (30 January 2024)
Quarter-final vs Qatar (3 February 2024)
  Mehdi Taremi     in Round of 16 vs Syria (31 January 2024) Quarter-final vs Japan (3 February 2024)
  Salem Al-Ajalin
  Ali Olwan
  in Group E vs Bahrain (matchday 3; 25 January 2024)
  in Quarter-final vs Tajikistan (2 February 2024)
Semi-final vs South Korea (6 February 2024)
  Kim Min-jae   in Group E vs Bahrain (matchday 1; 15 January 2024)
  in Quarter-final vs Australia (2 February 2024)
Semi-final vs Jordan (6 February 2024)
  Aiden O'Neill   in Quarter-final vs South Korea (2 February 2024) Suspension to be served outside the tournament
  Khalid Muneer   in Group A vs China (matchday 3; 22 January 2024)
  in Quarter-final vs Uzbekistan (3 February 2024)
Semi-final vs Iran (7 February 2024)
  Shojae Khalilzadeh   in Semi-final vs Qatar (7 February 2024) Suspension served outside the tournament
  1. ^ On 24 January 2024, Ali was provisionally suspended by the AFC for his positive doping test while awaiting a decision by the AFC Disciplinary and Ethics Committee. His provisional suspension was lifted on 30 January 2024.[32]

Awards edit

Most Valuable Player
Top Goalscorer
Best Goalkeeper
Fair Play Award
Team of the Tournament[34]
Goalkeeper Defenders Midfielders Forwards
  Meshaal Barsham   Abdallah Nasib
  Ali Al-Bulaihi
  Lucas Mendes
  Mehdi Ghayedi
  Craig Goodwin
  Hassan Al-Haydos
  Lee Kang-in
  Akram Afif
  Aymen Hussein
  Yazan Al-Naimat

Tournament rankings edit

Ranking criteria
For teams eliminated in the same knockout round, the following criteria are applied, in the order given, to determine the final rankings:[35]
  1. Goal difference in round eliminated;
  2. Goals scored in round eliminated;
  3. If teams eliminated in the semi-finals or quarter-finals are tied, the above criteria are reapplied for the previous knockout round, with this process repeated once more should two semi-finalists remain tied;
  4. Points in group stage;
  5. Goal difference in group stage;
  6. Goals scored in group stage;
  7. Disciplinary points.

For teams eliminated in the group stage, the following criteria are applied, in the order given, to determine the final rankings:[35]

  1. Position in group;
  2. Points;
  3. Goal difference;
  4. Goals scored;
  5. Disciplinary points.
Pos. Team G Pld W D L Pts GF GA GD
1   Qatar A 7 6 1 0 19 14 5 +9
2   Jordan E 7 4 1 2 13 13 8 +5
Eliminated in the semi-finals
3   Iran C 6 4 1 1 13 12 7 +5
4   South Korea E 6 2 3 1 9 11 10 +1
Eliminated in the quarter-finals
5   Uzbekistan B 5 2 3 0 9 7 3 +4
6   Australia B 5 3 1 1 10 9 3 +6
7   Japan D 5 3 0 2 9 12 8 +4
8   Tajikistan A 5 1 2 2 5 3 4 −1
Eliminated in the round of 16
9   Saudi Arabia F 4 2 2 0 8 5 2 +3
10   United Arab Emirates C 4 1 2 1 5 6 5 +1
11   Syria B 4 1 2 1 5 2 2 0
12   Iraq D 4 3 0 1 9 10 7 +3
13   Thailand F 4 1 2 1 5 3 2 +1
14   Palestine C 4 1 1 2 4 6 7 −1
15   Bahrain E 4 2 0 2 6 4 6 −2
16   Indonesia D 4 1 0 3 3 3 10 −7
Eliminated in the group stage
17   Oman F 3 0 2 1 2 2 3 −1
18   China A 3 0 2 1 2 0 1 −1
19   Lebanon A 3 0 1 2 1 1 5 −4
20   Kyrgyzstan F 3 0 1 2 1 1 5 −4
21   Malaysia E 3 0 1 2 1 3 8 −5
22   Vietnam D 3 0 0 3 0 4 8 −4
23   Hong Kong C 3 0 0 3 0 1 7 −6
24   India B 3 0 0 3 0 0 6 −6

Marketing edit

Logo and slogan edit

The official logo and TV opening of the tournament were launched during the final draw on 11 May 2023. The logo featured a silhouette of the AFC Asian Cup trophy, with the trophy lines inspired from feathers of a falcon and petals of the lotus flower. The top of the logo was colored in Qatar's national color, maroon, while the logo's tail featured an Arabic nuqta.[36]

The tournament's slogan, "Hayya Asia", translating to "Let's go Asia!", was revealed on 5 October 2023 in an event to mark 100 days until the tournament.[37]

Match ball edit

The official match ball, the VORTEXAC23 made by Kelme, was unveiled on 10 August 2023. The ball's design "incorporates Qatar’s maroon colours, echoing the nation’s identity, and mirrors the championship’s emblem at its centre". Technical assessments rigorously tested the ball's performance, ensuring its durability, quality, and readiness.[38]

On 20 December 2023, the official match ball of the final, the VORTEXAC23+, was revealed. The ball built on the design of the VORTEXAC23 and used a predominantly gold and maroon colour scheme "to reflect the prestige of competing for the AFC Asian Cup title".[39]

Official song edit

The official song of the tournament, "Hadaf" by Humood AlKhudher and Fahad Al Hajjaji, was released on 1 January 2024.[40][41]

Mascots edit

On 2 December 2023, the tournament's official mascots were unveiled at Barahat Msheireb, Doha, through an anime-inspired animation produced by Katara Studios. The mascots were a family of five jerboas named Saboog, Tmbki, Freha, Zkriti and Traeneh, who were also the mascots of the 2011 edition when Qatar last hosted the tournament. The mascots were created by Qatari artist Ahmed Al Maadheed, with the animation directed by Fahad Al Kuwari and the song performed by Qatari artist Dana Al Meer and singer/composer Tarek Al Arabi Tourgane. Four of the five mascots were named after locations in Qatar, while Saboog was derived from the term used to refer to a jerboa in Qatar. The mascots were each created with different characteristics, akin to the different roles players undertake during a football match, and made to resemble a traditional household in Qatar.[42][43]

Official video game edit

On 11 January 2024, Konami released a short trailer of the 2023 AFC Asian Cup game mode, and announced that it would be added to the latest release of its football video game series, eFootball 2024, in the upcoming updates. This mode features fully licensed tournament teams, licensed trophy and visuals.[44]

eSports tournament edit

On 8 December 2023, the AFC announced that it would unveil the inaugural edition of AFC eAsian Cup, which was held from 1 to 5 February 2024. This eSports tournament was played on Konami's football video game - eFootball 2024. It marked the confederation's first foray into the world of eSports. Taking place at the Virtuocity eSports Arena in Doha, the event featured participants from twenty AFC member associations, who were competing in the Asian Cup.[45][46][47]

On 6 February 2024, Indonesia won the first ever AFC eAsian Cup, winning 2–0 against Japan in the final.[48]

Ticket sales edit

The first batch of tickets for the tournament, with more than 150,000 tickets, were sold out in just a week, since sales began on 10 October 2023.[49] Another 90,000 tickets of the second batch were sold within the first 24 hours of being released on 19 November 2023. Fans from Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the Philippines, Indonesia and India bought the majority of tickets offered. In addition to the opening match between Qatar and Lebanon, the match between Saudi Arabia and Oman also led ticket sales.[50]

Prices for match tickets started from as low as QAR 25 (approximately US$6.8) to enable greater access for the millions of fans.[51]

On 20 November 2023, the Local Organising Committee (LOC) of the tournament announced that it would donate revenue from ticket sales to support emergency relief for Palestine, amidst the ongoing Israel–Hamas war.[52][53]

On 10 January 2024, the LOC announced that nearly one million tickets had been sold for the tournament.[54]

Ahead of the semi-final clash between Qatar and Iran, the Iranian federation complained of only 4 percent of the seats having been allocated to Iranian supporters, even though AFC regulations stated 8 percent needed to be allocated.[55]

Prize money edit

Total prize money pool for the tournament was US$14,800,000, the same as it was in the 2019 edition. The champions received US$5 million, the runners-up received US$3 million, and the losing semi-finalists received US$1 million each. All 24 participating teams also received US$200,000 for their participation in the tournament.[56][57]

Sponsorship edit

Official Global Partners
Official Global Supporters
Official Regional Partner
Official Hospitality Provider
  • MATCH Hospitality (Asia)[69]

Official Video and Data Distribution Partner

Broadcasting rights edit

The broadcasters around the world that acquired the rights to the tournament included:

Territory Broadcaster(s) Ref.
  Armenia TV Start [71]
  Australia Paramount+,[a] Network 10[b] [72]
  Austria Sportdigital [73]
  Azerbaijan TV Start [71]
  Bangladesh T Sports [74]
  Belarus TV Start [71]
  Belgium Triller TV [75]
  Bhutan Football Sports Development Limited [76]
  Bosnia and Herzegovina Sport Klub [77]
  Brazil ESPN [78]
  Bulgaria Diema Sport [77]
Balkans Sport Klub [79]
  Cambodia Hang Meas [75][80]
  Canada Paramount+ [81]
  Caribbean ESPN [78]
  China IQIYI Sports, Migu, CCTV [75][82]
  Croatia Sport Klub [77]
  East Timor MNC Media [83]
  Estonia TV Start [71]
  Finland C More Sport [84]
  France Triller TV [75]
  Georgia Silk Sport [75]
  Germany Sportdigital [73]
  Guam Paramount+ [85]
  Hong Kong HOY TV [86]
  India Sports18,[a] DD Sports,[c] JioCinema [75]
  Indonesia MNC Media [83]
In-flight/In-ship Sport 24 [87]
  Iraq Alrabiaa [88]
  Ireland Triller TV [75]
  Israel Sport 5 [75]
  Italy OneFootball [75]
  Ivory Coast RTI [75]
  Japan DAZN,[a] TV Asahi[d] [89][90]
  Kazakhstan Sport+ [75][91]
  Kenya Azam Sports [75]
  Kyrgyzstan KTRK [75]
  Laos KJSMWorld [80]
  Latin America ESPN [75][78]
  Latvia TV Start [71]
  Liechtenstein Sportdigital [73]
  Lithuania TV Start [71]
  Luxembourg Sportdigital [73]
  Macau M Plus Live [92]
  Malawi Azam Sports [75]
  Malaysia Astro SuperSport,[a] RTM[e] [75][93]
  Maldives PSM [94]
  MENA beIN Sports [95][96]
  Moldova TV Start [71]
  Mongolia Premier Sports [97]
  Montenegro Sport Klub [77]
  Myanmar Canal+ [98]
    Nepal Football Sports Development Limited [76]
  Netherlands Triller TV [75]
  North Macedonia Sport Klub [77]
  Northern Mariana Islands Paramount+ [85]
  Pacific Islands YouTube (free) [75]